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LOOK: TIME HORTONS PHILIPPINES REVEALS PRICES AND OPENING ON FEBRUARY 28, 2017


FEBRUARY 28 - Canada’s favorite coffee has officially arrived in Manila as confirmed by the press launch held yesterday at the Uptown Mall in BGC, Manila. Pinoys will finally be able to get access to the famous Timbits, Iced Capp and Double-Double that Tim Hortons is known for. As expected, the coffee chain will be bringing the similar menu offerings that they have here in Canada. It has been revealed that they will be offering locally inspired products in the future but before that happens, let’s compare the menus with prices. READ MORE...

ALSO: The Tim Hortons Story


NHL legend and restaurant founder Tim Horton appears on one of the new trading cards. I'm a 14+ year veteran of the rinks with my two kids from when they were Timbits, but this particular story involves a friend's young son and the great strides he's made on the ice since taking up our favourite sport just last winter. Hockey Momma (my better half) and I were at his first evaluation skate where he did his best Bambi impression and threatened to come off the ice only a few minutes in. But he soldiered on and finished the "skate". Then only a few weeks later we went returned to the rink where we found a completely different and confident kid motoring his way up and down the ice. The moments took me back to when my own kids were just finding their ice legs at four years old and I wanted to turn back the clock. READ MORE...

ALSO: Tim Hortons Hires People with Disabilities
Story by Mark Wafer, Tim Hortons franchisee ..meet him below...


PHOTO: 'I luv my job at Tims' says Ron Michael Adea, a 25-year-old autistic member of the working crew at Tim Horton's in Mississauga, Ontario.
Hiring people with disabilities often doesn’t require adding accommodation measures and can boost the profit of a business, says Mark Wafer, Tim Hortons franchisee. When Tim Hortons franchisee Mark Wafer hired Clint Sparling, a young man with Down Syndrome to work at his busy Ontario cafe he didn’t know the decision would transform his business and inspire a two decade crusade for inclusive employment. Sparling was a hard worker, never complained and was always happy to be there says Wafer. He rarely took sick days and boosted morale among the other employees. Nearly two decades later, Sparling is still part of Wafer’s team, is married and owns his own condo. “Very quickly after I hired Clint I realized he was my best employee,” says Wafer who now owns seven Tim Hortons locations in Ontario. “That’s why I continue to hire people with disabilities.” Wafer hired 91 people with disabilities (PWD) including 41 now employed in his workforce of 210. He has also become a vocal advocate for more inclusive employment in Canada. READ MORE...


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Look: Tim Hortons Philippines reveals prices and opening on Feb 28

MANILA, FEBRUARY 27, 2017 (PINOY-CANADA ONLINE) Story By: Admin - Canada’s favorite coffee has officially arrived in Manila as confirmed by the press launch held yesterday at the Uptown Mall in BGC, Manila.

Pinoys will finally be able to get access to the famous Timbits, Iced Capp and Double-Double that Tim Hortons is known for. As expected, the coffee chain will be bringing the similar menu offerings that they have here in Canada.

It has been revealed that they will be offering locally inspired products in the future but before that happens, let’s compare the menus with prices.

For reference: CAD to PHP Chart 25 Feb 2017 15:00 UTC - 26 Feb 2017 15:04 UTC CAD/PHP close:38.32181
1 USD = 50.1690 February 26, 2017 XE Currency Converter: USD to PHP

Based on the prices, it is clearly more expensive in Manila. However, don’t all food chains increase their prices when they enter the Philippines?

Tim Hortons in Manila is priced to compete with Starbucks’ prices. This is totally different from what we can see here in Canada because Starbucks is way more expensive than Timmy’s.

That is one of the main reasons Canadians love Tim Hortons!


 

Aside from the product offerings, it is good to see how Tim Hortons will be as an employer in the Philippines.

Here in Canada, their employees receive at least the minimum gross wage of CAD11/hour or CAD88/day (php 3,344) In the Philippines, if they will follow the minimum gross wage, the employees should at least receive PHP481/day.

You do the math. Given the lower cost of manpower in the Philippines, it is safe to assume that Tim Hortons will be hiring more employees to run a store in Manila than in Canada. This may be a good opportunity for our fresh graduate or unemployed kababayans as Tim Hortons will be opening 2 other branches soon!

Do you think Pinoys will be as welcoming and loving to Tim Hortons as they are to Starbucks? One thing is for sure: a lot of Pinoys will have a new tambayan place because Timmy’s will be open 24 hours! The first branch will open on February 28 at the ground floor of Uptown Place Mall, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City. We’ll see how our kababayans will receive Timmy’s then.


TIM HORTONS WEBSITE

Tim Hortons Story


NHL legend and restaurant founder Tim Horton appears on one of the new trading cards.

Back to Future Hockey Beginnings


Let the kids skate, um walk, a few strides, pick them up and repeat. Once they realize the falling down on ice part doesn’t hurt when you’re covered in pads they’re typically good to go. We’d been told the young lad had scored his first goal a couple of weeks earlier and had definitely caught the hockey bug in a major way. For full story click link below....

I'm a 14+ year veteran of the rinks with my two kids from when they were Timbits, but this particular story involves a friend's young son and the great strides he's made on the ice since taking up our favourite sport just last winter.

Hockey Momma (my better half) and I were at his first evaluation skate where he did his best Bambi impression and threatened to come off the ice only a few minutes in. But he soldiered on and finished the "skate".

Then only a few weeks later we went returned to the rink where we found a completely different and confident kid motoring his way up and down the ice. The moments took me back to when my own kids were just finding their ice legs at four years old and I wanted to turn back the clock.

For more on this particular story, and a bunch of others, many of which involve Tim Hortons in one way or another as so many Canadian hockey moments do, please visit http://www.imahockeydad.com/2013/01/30/back-to-future-hockey-beginnings/

WATCH VIDEO: Tim Horton" Hockey Legend and Name behind the Coffee Chain Doc
Published on Dec 4, 2016

 
https://youtu.be/wXV_BXYzx64?t=75
 

Tim Horton
FROM WIKIPEDIA

Miles Gilbert "Tim" Horton (January 12, 1930 – February 21, 1974) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player, a defenceman for 24 seasons in the National Hockey League.

He played for the Toronto Maple Leafs, New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins, and Buffalo Sabres. On January 1, 2017, in a ceremony prior to the Centennial Classic, Horton was part of the first group of players to be named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.

Also a successful businessman, Horton was a co-founder of the Tim Hortons restaurant chain.

Horton was born in Cochrane, Ontario, at Lady Minto Hospital, to Ethel May (née Irish) and Aaron Oakley Horton, a Canadian National Railway mechanic. Tim had one brother, Gerry Horton. He had English, Irish, and Scottish ancestry.

The family moved in 1935 to Duparquet, Quebec, returning to Ontario in 1938 to Cochrane; the family moved to Sudbury in 1945.

Playing career

Horton grew up playing ice hockey in Cochrane, and later in mining country near Timmins. The Toronto Maple Leafs organization signed him; in 1948 he moved to Toronto to play junior hockey and attended St. Michael's College School.

Two years later, he turned pro with the Leafs' farm team, the Pittsburgh Hornets of the American Hockey League. He spent most of the first three seasons with Pittsburgh. Playing in his first NHL game on March 26, 1950, Horton did not appear in the NHL again until the fall of 1952.

He remained a Leaf until 1970, winning four Stanley Cups. Horton later played for the New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins and Buffalo Sabres. He was known for his tremendous strength and calmness under pressure.

As a hard-working and durable defenceman, he gained relatively few penalty minutes for an enforcer-type defenceman. He was also an effective puck carrier – in 1964–65 he played right wing for the Leafs. Horton appeared in seven National Hockey League All-Star Games. He was named an NHL First Team All-Star three times: (1964, 1968, and 1969). He was selected to the NHL Second Team three times: (1954, 1963, 1967).

Between February 11, 1961, and February 4, 1968, Horton appeared in 486 consecutive regular-season games; this remains the Leafs club record for consecutive games and was the NHL record for consecutive games by a defenceman until broken on February 8, 2007, by Karlis Skrastins.

Horton had a reputation for enveloping players fighting him in a crushing bear hug.

While playing, Horton was generally acknowledged as the strongest man in the game; injuries and age were little more than minor inconveniences. Chicago Blackhawks left wing Bobby Hull declared, "There were defencemen you had to fear because they were vicious and would slam you into the boards from behind, for one, Eddie Shore. But you respected Tim Horton because he didn't need that type of intimidation. He used his tremendous strength and talent to keep you in check."

In 1962, he scored three goals and 13 assists in 12 playoff games, setting a Leafs team record for playoff points by a defenceman. This record was tied in 1978 by Ian Turnbull (who played 13 games); but was not broken until 1994, when David Ellett registered 18 points (albeit in 18 games).

At age 41, Horton signed a one-year contract with the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1971 for an estimated $100,000, the largest contract to date for the five-year-old franchise.

In spite of Horton's age, 42, and considerable nearsightedness, former Leafs general manager Punch Imlach of the Sabres acquired Horton in the intra-league draft and signed him in 1972.

In 1973, his performance assisted the Sabres in their first playoff appearance. Horton later signed a contract extension in the off-season.

While playing for the Leafs, Horton wore the number 7, the same number worn by King Clancy from 1931–32 to 1936–37.

The team declared both Horton and Clancy honoured players at a ceremony on November 21, 1995, but did not retire the number 7 from team use; despite this, it became an Honoured Jersey Number, abiding by Leafs honours policy.

Horton wore number 2 in Buffalo (as Rick Martin already had the number 7), which was retired.

Horton believed he took too many early career penalties because of his "hot temper".

Doughnut industries


Statue of Horton outside the original Tim Hortons store in Hamilton

In 1964, Horton opened his first Tim Horton Doughnut Shop in Hamilton, Ontario on Ottawa Street.[13] He added a few of his culinary creations to the initial menu. By 1968, Tim Horton had become a multimillion-dollar franchise system. Horton's previous business ventures included both a hamburger restaurant and Studebaker auto dealership in Toronto.

Upon Horton's death in 1974, his business partner Ron Joyce bought out the Horton family's shares for $1 million and took over as sole owner of the existing chain, which had 40 stores at the time, and later expanded to nearly 4,600 stores in Canada alone by 2013. Joyce's son, Ron Joyce, Jr., is married to Horton's eldest daughter.

Death and aftermath

In the early morning of February 21, 1974, Horton was killed in a car accident when he lost control of his De Tomaso Pantera sports car on the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) in St. Catharines, Ontario. He had played a game in Toronto the previous evening against his former team, the Maple Leafs, and was driving alone back to Buffalo, 100 mi (160 km) south. The Sabres had lost the game, and despite sitting out the third period and playing with a jaw and ankle injury, Horton was selected one of the game's three stars.

Horton's Pantera had been given to him by Sabres' manager Punch Imlach as an enticement to return to the team for one more season.

While driving to Buffalo, Horton stopped at his office in Oakville, and was met there by Ron Joyce.[18][19] While there, Horton phoned his brother Gerry, who recognized that Tim had been drinking and tried to convince him not to go. Joyce also offered to have Horton stay with him. Horton chose to continue his drive to Buffalo.

After 4:00 a.m. EST (9:00 UTC), a woman reported to the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) in Burlington that she had observed a car travelling at a high rate of speed on the QEW. A warning was broadcast over police radio. Thirty minutes later, OPP Officer Mike Gula observed a speeding vehicle travelling Niagara-bound on the QEW in Vineland. Gula activated his siren and attempted to pursue Horton's vehicle, but lost sight of it.

Horton passed a curve in the road at Ontario Street and was approaching the Lake Street exit in St. Catharines when he lost control and drove into the centre grass median, where his tire caught a recessed sewer and then flipped several times before coming to a stop on its roof in the Toronto-bound lanes. Not wearing a seatbelt, Horton was found 123 ft (37 m) from the car. He was pronounced dead on arrival at the St. Catharines General Hospital.

Subsequent to Horton's death, there was no official public inquiry, and his autopsy was not made public. Police would not state if Horton was driving drunk.

In 2005, the autopsy was made public (with witness statements redacted) and revealed that Horton's blood alcohol level was twice the legal limit, and that a half-filled vodka bottle was amongst the crash debris. Horton was also in possession of the drugs Dexedrine (a stimulant) and Dexamyl (a stimulant-sedative), and traces of amobarbital (an ingredient in Dexamyl) were found in his blood.

The autopsy report found no painkillers in Horton's body, and also concluded that his car had been in good working order. There was nothing to suggest Horton was evading police, or that police got near enough to initiate a criminal pursuit.

Horton was interred at York Cemetery in Toronto.

Married in 1952, he left a wife, the former Lori Michalek of Pittsburgh, and four daughters.

Following Horton's death, Ron Joyce offered Horton's widow Lori $1 million for her shares in the chain, which included 40 stores. She accepted his offer and Joyce became sole owner.

Years later, Lori became dissatisfied with Joyce's offer, and filed a lawsuit against him.

In 1993, Lori lost the lawsuit; an appeal was declined in 1995 and she died in 2000 at the age of 68.

Tim and Lori were survived by four daughters: Jeri-Lyn (Horton-Joyce), Traci (Simone), Kim, and Kelly. Jeri-Lyn married Joyce's son (Ron Jr.) and owns a store in Cobourg, Ontario.

Tim Horton Children's Foundation


Tim Horton's Foundation :)report Tim Horton's Foundation :)
It seemed like it was yesterday when I went to the Tim Horton’s camp in Kananaskis, Alberta. I went one weekend with a club I was part of. The staff there was amazing, the food was amazing, and most importantly, the accommodations was great. We had a lot of things to do - we played in a recreation like building that had basketball hoops, hockey nets, hockey sticks, and things like that. It was really fun. We sang songs, told stories, and had a lot of laughs. All of this would not have been possible if there were not generous people who bought coffee and donated to the Tim Horton Children’s Foundation. Ever since I went camping there, I have gone to Tim Horton’s a lot more!

Some of our favourite stories come from the campers at Tim Horton Childrens Foundation camps.

The Tim Horton Memorial Camp in Parry Sound, Ontario opened its doors in 1975 to honour Tim Hortons desire to help less fortunate children.

For many kids, Tim Horton Childrens Foundation camps offer their first trip away from home. Its a chance to have fun, to develop confidence and life skills, and to build memories to last a lifetime.

Today the Tim Horton Childrens Foundation runs five camps in Canada, and we opened our first U.S. location in 2001.

This year, we were able to give the benefits of a week at camp to over 13,000 disadvantaged children.

 
Timbits Hockey takes on the NHL Heritage Classic
TimHortons
Published on Dec 28, 2016
On October 23, 2016, 24 Timbits Hockey players took to the ice during the NHL Heritage Classic for an unforgettable game.
Category
Entertainment


TIM HORTONS FRANCHISE NEWS ONLINE

Tim Hortons Hires People with Disabilities Mark-Wafer-300x199


Mark Wafer, Tim Hortons owner, and Clint Sparling (Photo submitted)
Mark Wafer, MSC OMC is a Tim Hortons franchise owner, Disability rights advocate, Int'l public Speaker, Race car driver, Policy change instigator Toronto, Canada AreaExecutive Office INFO LIFTED FROM LinkedIn

Hiring people with disabilities often doesn’t require adding accommodation measures and can boost the profit of a business, says Mark Wafer, Tim Hortons franchisee.

When Tim Hortons franchisee Mark Wafer hired Clint Sparling, a young man with Down Syndrome to work at his busy Ontario cafe he didn’t know the decision would transform his business and inspire a two decade crusade for inclusive employment.

Sparling was a hard worker, never complained and was always happy to be there says Wafer. He rarely took sick days and boosted morale among the other employees. Nearly two decades later, Sparling is still part of Wafer’s team, is married and owns his own condo.

“Very quickly after I hired Clint I realized he was my best employee,” says Wafer who now owns seven Tim Hortons locations in Ontario.

“That’s why I continue to hire people with disabilities.”

Wafer hired 91 people with disabilities (PWD) including 41 now employed in his workforce of 210. He has also become a vocal advocate for more inclusive employment in Canada.

READ MORE...

The cause is personal for Wafer who only has 20 percent hearing and struggled to keep working until he became a business person.

About 3.8 million people or 13 7 percent of Canadians aged 15 and older reported having a disability in 2012 according to Statistics
Canada. The unemployment rate for people with disabilities is now 54 percent, compared to the national average of 6.9 percent, according to StatsCan.

Wafer estimates unemployment for PWD is actually closer to 70 percent if those who have given up looking for work out of frustration are included.

“Not only is hiring people with disabilities the right thing to do,” says Wafer. “It can have a dramatic effect on a business’s bottom line.”

” In bringing them into the workplace you’re getting a more loyal employee you’re getting a person that will stay with you longer, you’re getting a person who is more innovative, more productive and who will work in a safer means.”

Myths and Misconceptions

Wafer’s stores stats are a testament to the potential of employing people with disabilities. Among his franchises the employee turnover compared to the industry average of 75 percent. It costs about $4 000 to train a new employee.

In 2011 the absenteeism rate among Wafer’s 33 employees with disabilities was zero. He has never made a work-related injury
insurance claim for an employee with a disability. But the “myths and misconceptions about employing people with disabilities remain the greatest barrier to more inclusive workplaces, “says Wafer.

Common concems he hears from CEOs are that safety, productivity or innovation could be compromised by hiring PWD.

The greatest misconception,” he says, “is that bosses can’t fire an employee with a disability if things are not working out. These fears are groundless,” citing several U.S. studies that people with disabilities often have higher safety awareness take fewer risks and show productivity and innovation on par with or better than average.

“The number one barrier to inclusive employment is attitude” says


PHOTO: 'I luv my job at Tims' says Ron Michael Adea, a 25-year-old autistic member of the working crew at Tim Horton's in Mississauga, Ontario

Wafer “however I see improvement in awareness and understanding over the last five years. Business people are starting to get It, slowly. They finally realize this it’s simply good for business.”

The federal government has also moved to break down barriers to hiring people with disabilities in recent years. Since 2008 over 1.100 projects have been awarded through the Enabling Accessibility Fund, a grants program that supports capital costs related to improving accessibility and safety for PWD in the workplace.

“Canadians with disabilities have a lot to contribute to our economic growth but have traditionally been under-represented in the labour force,” said Employment Minister Jason Kenney in a December 2013 statement marking the launch of a new stream for the fund.

“This fund encourages employers to create accessible workplaces for people with disabilities to provide them with better job opportunities. I urge all Canadian employers to do more to train and hire Canadians with disabilities and to ensure their workplaces are accessible.”

While Wafer applauds government efforts to support inclusive workplaces, he says real change depends on the private sector. Only
seven percent of workers with disabilities are employed in that sector-the largest employer in the country. Government can’t fix this the social service sector can’t fix this the community partners the agencies, they can’t fix this says Wafer. “The only entity that can fix inclusive employment is the private sector.”


CLICK THIS IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION

From CP By Stephen Pate, NJN Network

Read full article at – http://www.oyetimes.com/lifestyle/daily-life/57049-tim-hortons-hire-people-with-disabilities


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