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PHNO TRAVEL & LIFESTYE (FOOD)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

SOL JOSE VANZI's  LIFESTYLE & FOOD PAGE THIS WEEK

FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

DAVAO DELIGHTS: TRIBUTE TO THE NEW PRESIDENT
[A feast at Café Ilang Ilang awaits]


JUNE 30 -Pinausukang tanigue  Most visitors to Davao long to return to its paradise-like mountains, forests and bodies of water, sources of the sweetest fruits, tender meats, and rare seafood fresh out of the sea. Nowhere else in the Philippines is such a bountiful combination found, fuelling the influx from Luzon of organic farmers and aqua culturists, cheese makers, chocolate confectioners, chefs, and restaurateurs. There was a time when a culinary adventure in Davao City meant only one thing: cold beers and grilled tuna at Luz Kinilaw, a rickety two-storey wooden structure that had neither air conditioning nor sanitary comfort room. A recent fire forced the building of a new restaurant with better facilities. The menu stayed. SUTUKIL – Our host during our first Davao visit in 1972 chose a big fish and told the Luz Kinilaw cook: “sutukil” which we misheard as “shoot to kill,” not knowing that the coined word is a combination of three Cebuano words: “Su” from sugba (grilled), “tu” from tula (soup), and “kil” from kilaw (seviche). The cook produced a meal consisting of grilled fish tail, fish head sinigang, and boneless fish kinilaw. READ MORE...

ALSO: Cooking chicken, then and now; A tinola by any other name…


JUNE 18 -GOOGLE IMAGES Life in the 1950s was as simple and pure as the food we ate: vegetables and fish six days a week, some kind of meat on Sundays. No one had chefs; everyone was expected to know how to cook.
My generation, like those before me, did not have the luxury of learning from cooking schools, Food TV Network, Gourmet, or Bon Appétit magazines. We learned from neighbors and friends. We watched out-of-town kusineras prepare banquets for hundreds during town fiestas. As kids, we were given simple, but messy, kitchen tasks such as cleaning hog intestines destined to become longanisa casings, and collecting blood from butchered pigs to make dinuguan. By age nine, I was considered old enough to kill chicken, which was the family’s traditional Sunday meal, we raised native chicken the old fashioned way, so the first step was the hardest: catch the chicken. I was taught to form a long row of corn kernels that led to a big overturned basket—some sort of trap. The second act was cleaning the top steps of the kitchen stairs, and place a bowl containing half a cup of uncooked rice on the second to the last step. Then we prepared to kill the fowl. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Davao delights: Tribute to the new President
[A feast at Café Ilang Ilang awaits]


Pinausukang tanigue

MANILA, JULY 4, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi June 30, 2016 - Most visitors to Davao long to return to its paradise-like mountains, forests and bodies of water, sources of the sweetest fruits, tender meats, and rare seafood fresh out of the sea.


Sugpo at manga cocktail

Nowhere else in the Philippines is such a bountiful combination found, fuelling the influx from Luzon of organic farmers and aqua culturists, cheese makers, chocolate confectioners, chefs, and restaurateurs.

There was a time when a culinary adventure in Davao City meant only one thing: cold beers and grilled tuna at Luz Kinilaw, a rickety two-storey wooden structure that had neither air conditioning nor sanitary comfort room.


Sinabawang halaan

A recent fire forced the building of a new restaurant with better facilities. The menu stayed.

SUTUKIL – Our host during our first Davao visit in 1972 chose a big fish and told the Luz Kinilaw cook: “sutukil” which we misheard as “shoot to kill,” not knowing that the coined word is a combination of three Cebuano words: “Su” from sugba (grilled), “tu” from tula (soup), and “kil” from kilaw (seviche).

The cook produced a meal consisting of grilled fish tail, fish head sinigang, and boneless fish kinilaw.

READ MORE...

MANILA HOTEL DAVAO SPECIALS – Memories of that meal returned last Monday, when our group of foodies had our fill of sutukil and other rare Davao food specialties at the Manila Hotel’s Café Ilang-Ilang, which is paying tribute to the new national leadership with a special Davao-inspired buffet menu for lunch and dinner.

It’s providential that the Manila Hotel’s executive sous chef Roberto Bulawit has had decades of experience in preparing regional Filipino food.


Kinhason stuffed scallops

That, plus daily morning deliveries by air from Davao ensure top quality seafood supplies and authentic recipes for the special Davao buffet.

SHELLFISH GALORE – In Mindanao and Cebu (where President Rodrigo Duterte lived before moving to Davao), shellfish is often stuffed with cheese and baked until bubbly. The Manila Hotel stuffs giant oysters and mussels.


DAVAO-INSPIRED Baked oysters

Baked scallops, on the other hand, are stuffed with cheese and chopped spinach then topped with caramelized onions. In Davao, this special dish is called kinhason.

Huge Manila clams are reserved for sinabawang halaan, a soup flavored with ginger.


Kapitan de Davao

A spectacular dish called kapitan de Davao consists of a variety of seafood (prawns, squid rings, fish chunks) grilled, then napped with a light lemongrass sauce.

DAVAO CAVIAR – The best, and rarest, part of the fish is its roe, more popularly known as caviar depending on the kind of fish it comes from.


Adobong biho

In Mindanao and the Visayas, fish roe is called bihud while fish sperm (milt) is called bagaybay; both are rarely found in public markets as fishermen keep them for their own consumption.

In Davao, one of the centers for deep-sea commercial fishing and processing, large tuna and tanigue (Spanish mackerel), seasonally provides large quantities of bihud and bagaybay, which are very rare in other places.


Ensaladang dampalit

A large serving tray of fried adobong bihud delighted aficionados at the Café Ilang Ilang, who could not believe their luck.

The whole fish egg sacks were simmered in calamansi and soy sauce until firm to the touch, then fried until crisp on the outside. The sacks are sliced diagonally and served with vinegar-chili-calamansi dip.


Hinalang na manok

Café Ilang-Ilang, Manila Hotel: 02 527 0011


MANILA BULLETIN

Cooking chicken, then and now; A tinola by any other name… by Sol Vanzi June 18, 2016 (updated) Share7 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share7


GOOGLE IMAGES

Life in the 1950s was as simple and pure as the food we ate: vegetables and fish six days a week, some kind of meat on Sundays. No one had chefs; everyone was expected to know how to cook.

My generation, like those before me, did not have the luxury of learning from cooking schools, Food TV Network, Gourmet, or Bon Appétit magazines. We learned from neighbors and friends. We watched out-of-town kusineras prepare banquets for hundreds during town fiestas.

As kids, we were given simple, but messy, kitchen tasks such as cleaning hog intestines destined to become longanisa casings, and collecting blood from butchered pigs to make dinuguan.

By age nine, I was considered old enough to kill chicken, which was the family’s traditional Sunday meal, we raised native chicken the old fashioned way, so the first step was the hardest: catch the chicken. I was taught to form a long row of corn kernels that led to a big overturned basket—some sort of trap.

The second act was cleaning the top steps of the kitchen stairs, and place a bowl containing half a cup of uncooked rice on the second to the last step. Then we prepared to kill the fowl.

READ MORE...

On the stairs’ top step. We planted a foot firmly on the chicken’s wings and feet while holding its head back to expose the neck. Next we plucked the neck clean of feathers and tapped it with the flat side of a sharp knife. Then we sliced the throbbing neck vein, making sure the blood dripped unto the rice-filled bowl.

We kept our awkward and uncomfortable position for several minutes after the blood had stopped dripping. I have seen many hens and roosters fly around long after they had lost their heads. That’s where we got the saying: “running around like a headless chicken.”

Once the bird was finally limp, it was time to dress it: blanch with water, pull out all the feathers, singe off the stubborn pin feathers around the neck and ass, rub all over with salt, rinse with tap water.

The dressed chicken was finally ready to cut into parts according to the planned menu. The whole process, from start to finish, could take as long as 30 minutes per bird, but is worth all the time and effort.

Just ask President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, who was raised by his mother Soledad on tinola using only native chicken she used to purchase live from Davao’s Bangkerohan Public Market.


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim" EVERY THURSDAY OF THE WEEK.
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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