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PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

SOL JOSE VANZI's  LIFESTYLE & TRAVEL PAGE THIS WEEK

FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

CAFÉ ILANG-ILANG's PINOY FOOD AT ITS BEST!

[Independence Day menu tours you around the country]


JUNE 16 -INDEPENDENCE MEALS Clockwise from top left: Red Kintoman rice, giant oysters from the Visayas, tanigue kinilaw, and Zamboanga curacha Images by MANNY LLANES
 Thousands gathered at Rizal Park last Sunday to commemorate the proclamation of Philippine Independence 118 years ago. The celebration began early in the morning with the highest officials of the Republic of the Philippines joined by the top honchos of the City of Manila and lasted well into the night, capped by fireworks and musical presentations. While all these were going on, hundreds of local and foreign tourists were inside the Manila Hotel celebrating the event with some of the best food gathered from all over the Philippines, prepared by the most experienced Pinoy kitchen staff in the hospitality industry. Authenticity Is Key The group is led by a veteran, lovingly nicknamed Chef Amang, who has been with the Manila Hotel for as long as I can remember. The nickname for Roberto Bulawin is appropriate, for he’s like a father to the staff who could never thank him enough for generously sharing his vast experience in preparing Filipino dishes from scratch. READ MORE...


JUNE 12 -118th INDEPENDENCE DAY AT RIZAL PARK

ALSO: Of Dads and Heroes


JUNE 18 -STORIES OF 3 MODERN-DAY DADS: This Father’s Day, we pay homage to the most important man in our lives—our dads. Meet three different fathers with three different stories, all bound by love and devotion to their children. The birth of hope Hayden Kho shares his story of redemption, love, and hope–and how a little girl made it all possible. At 15 months old, Scarlet Snow, Hayden Kho and Vicki Belo’s daughter, has yet to learn how to speak save for the usual one-syllable words such as ma and da. But this early, she understands three important words Kho has taught her that the first-time dad hopes would become the foundation of her discipline: no, obey, and wait. Scarlet’s existence has been an open secret to certain people, including this journalist, even before Kho, 36, officially posted pictures of her on social media sometime last month. Born in the US through a surrogate mother, the baby’s name is biblical in nature, as it was inspired by Isaiah 118: “Though your sins be red as scarlet, I shall make them white as snow.”  Kho, who became an ardent Evangelical Christian a few years ago after figuring in a number of headline-hogging controversies, declined to reveal specifics behind Scarlet’s genesis. But from all indications, the tall, movie star-handsome doctor has become a changed man or, at least, someone who wants to do right by his daughter. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Francis Kong - The fathers of 1900 and the fathers of today


JUNE 18 -GOOGLED PHOTO
Weary and tired of constantly picking clothes up from the floor of her son’s room, a mother finally laid down the law: each item of clothing she had to pick up would cost her son P10. By the end of the week, he owed her P120. She received the money promptly, along with a P20 tip and a note that read, “Thanks, Mom – Keep up the good work!”  Mothers do all the hard work at home. The more fortunate among them have helpers but most mothers without the benefit of household help do hard work in managing the household. Fathers work hard too. They have to bring home the bread and butter. I know for a fact that there are more women entering the workplace and occupying leadership positions and doing very well in their roles, men are still expected to lead their families in the home front. Celebrating Father’s Day tomorrow, I have this old material I have kept over the years that talk about the difference between the fathers of 1900 and the fathers of today. I reckon this material would be timely for the occasion. Reflect on this for a moment and tell me whether it makes sense to you or not. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Pinoy food at Its best!
[Café Ilang-Ilang’s Independence Day menu tours you around the country]


INDEPENDENCE MEALS Clockwise from top left: Red Kintoman rice, giant oysters from the Visayas, tanigue kinilaw, and Zamboanga curacha Images by MANNY LLANES

MANILA, JUNE 20, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi June 16, 2016 - Thousands gathered at Rizal Park last Sunday to commemorate the proclamation of Philippine Independence 118 years ago.

The celebration began early in the morning with the highest officials of the Republic of the Philippines joined by the top honchos of the City of Manila and lasted well into the night, capped by fireworks and musical presentations.

While all these were going on, hundreds of local and foreign tourists were inside the Manila Hotel celebrating the event with some of the best food gathered from all over the Philippines, prepared by the most experienced Pinoy kitchen staff in the hospitality industry.

Authenticity Is Key

The group is led by a veteran, lovingly nicknamed Chef Amang, who has been with the Manila Hotel for as long as I can remember. The nickname for Roberto Bulawin is appropriate, for he’s like a father to the staff who could never thank him enough for generously sharing his vast experience in preparing Filipino dishes from scratch.

READ MORE...

“Instant mixes will never be as good as ingredients used by our grandmothers,” Chef Amang admonishes. “We always take the time and effort to stay true to the original and authentic recipes, no matter how intricate and time consuming they may be.”


CULINARY TREASURES Clockwise from top left: Pasayan sa manga, bulalo, ensaladang ampalaya. and Chef Amang (extreme left) and his staff

From Every Corner

The special Independence Day menu at the Café Ilang-Ilang buffet was like a whirlwind tour of far-flung islands, towns, and cities all over the country.

There were curacha crabs from Zamboanga, prepared Bicolano-style in coconut cream and chili peppers. Tuba and lambanog spirits from coconut sap were mixed with calamansi juice to marinate huge poached Palawan prawns and half-ripe mango in the dish called pasayan sa manga.

Sweet pomelos from Davao contrasted in a salad with sliced shrimp. Also from Davao were kinilaw na tanigue (ceviche of Spanish mackerel) and the native deer for adobong usa.

The rich waters of the Visayas Region supplied alimasag (blue swimming crab), talaba (oysters), tahong (mussels), and sugpo (tiger prawns) flown to the Manila Hotel daily.

Nueva Ecija and Laguna provinces produce the kasilyo (white carabao cheese) for snacking and stuffing. We tasted balut from Pateros, peeled and cooked adobo-style, much to the other local guests’ delight. Lightly covered with sauce, the unborn duckling was hardly visible and could only be distinguished after the first vinegary, garlicky bite.

Rare Mountain Rice

The dark maroon grains of rare Kintoman rice, harvested from the mountains of Kibungan, Benguet, were steamed with pandan leaves to bring out subtle flavors. It is also cultivated in Sagada, Kalinga, and Mountain Province.

Kintoman rice varieties include red rice variants gal-ong, lasbakan, lablabi, kabal, dikalot, makabsog, langpadan, and balatinao. Only 500 hectares are planted to rice in Kibungan, thus limiting its supply.

We thus felt so honored to partake of this culinary treasure at the Manila Hotel buffet.

The upland rice was perfect with Batangas beef knees and shin cooked bulalo-style, simmered for hours with vegetables and while black peppercorn.

The Independence Day special menu was an unforgettable meal that could only be topped by next year’s all-Filipino menu. We can hardly wait.


Café Ilang-Ilang, the newest buffet in town


MANILA BULLETIN

Of Dads and Heroes By Alex Y. Vergara June 18, 2016 (updated) Share3 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share13

Images by Noel Pabalate

This Father’s Day, we pay homage to the most important man in our lives—our dads. Meet three different fathers with three different stories, all bound by love and devotion to their children.

The birth of hope

Hayden Kho shares his story of redemption, love, and hope–and how a little girl made it all possible.

At 15 months old, Scarlet Snow, Hayden Kho and Vicki Belo’s daughter, has yet to learn how to speak save for the usual one-syllable words such as ma and da. But this early, she understands three important words Kho has taught her that the first-time dad hopes would become the foundation of her discipline: no, obey, and wait.

Scarlet’s existence has been an open secret to certain people, including this journalist, even before Kho, 36, officially posted pictures of her on social media sometime last month. Born in the US through a surrogate mother, the baby’s name is biblical in nature, as it was inspired by Isaiah 118: “Though your sins be red as scarlet, I shall make them white as snow.”

Kho, who became an ardent Evangelical Christian a few years ago after figuring in a number of headline-hogging controversies, declined to reveal specifics behind Scarlet’s genesis. But from all indications, the tall, movie star-handsome doctor has become a changed man or, at least, someone who wants to do right by his daughter.

READ MORE...

Scarlet stays with Belo, while Kho lives several minutes away from them. He gladly made adjustments in his schedule by waking up very early in the morning and driving to Belo’s place almost daily just to have a chance to interact with his daughter, who’s already up by 5:30 a.m. on most days. “Let’s just say Scarlet is 100 percent our baby,” he said one laidback morning at Belo’s Makati residence. “We’d rather not go into details of how it happened.”


Hayden Kho, Vicki Belo, Scarlet Snow

Upon Kho’s request, for instance, we started doing this interview and photo shoot at 8 a.m., when Scarlet is most active. By 9:30 a.m., she would usually start to become sleepy, said Kho. Before long, she would again hit the sack for a few more hours of sleep.

Kho, a hands-on father, has left such everyday tasks as feeding, bathing, and changing Scarlet’s diapers to her nannies in favor of more important things like attending to her checkup, immunization schedule, and, believe it or not, education. Certain days of the week are devoted to her music, gymnastics, swimming, and “reading” lessons.

Thanks to her reading and decision-making lessons, she can now associate a number of letters with the names of certain animals. Kho also hopes that her weekly music lessons would help develop Scarlet’s ear for music and talent for singing, which seems to have eluded her accomplished parents.

“No one would pay Vicki and me to sing,” said Kho with a chuckle. “But everyone, no matter how silly he or she may sound, can sing lullabies. I think parents would be able to relate to what I’m saying. Everyone becomes child-like in front of a baby. Her every smile is precious. Even strangers try hard to make a baby smile. And every time she does, it’s like one big achievement.”

If you ask him, the hardest part in raising an individual is learning how to instill discipline. In Kho’s baby manual, you should start disciplining a child the moment she shows signs of “defiance.” Again, he declined to go into specifics, but he did concede that discipline comes in many forms.

As a parent, it’s only natural to want to give everything to your child. At the same time, you’re also careful not to spoil her. A good part of childrearing, he said, is giving your baby “a fair measure of trials and challenges for her to grow.” More than the early music and dance lessons, learning how to wait and obey her elders, including her nannies, helps shape her character.


Meet Scarlet Snow - Dr. Vicki Belo and Hayden Kho's Daughter

Scarlet learned how to say ma first because of Belo’s late mother Nena Belo. Before she passed on, she spent time with her newest grandchild almost every day, said Kho. Everyone called Nena “mama,” and Scarlet must have absorbed it.

“She talks a lot, mostly senseless words,” said Kho. “Right now, there are just three words I want her to understand. These words are no, obey, and wait. When Daddy and Mommy say no, that means no.”

Kho is now grappling with what countless parents like him grappled with before—a desire to give his child the best without spoiling her. This can be doubly hard since Scarlet’s parents, especially Belo, are known for their generosity. But being a disciple of consumerism is the last thing they want their daughter to become. As far as Kho is concerned, there should be very little room—at least for now—for instant gratification.

“When daddy says come here or sit down, she should be expected to obey,” said Kho. “When daddy says eat your food first and wait before you get a marshmallow, which is a form of reward, then she should wait.”

Like Kho, Scarlet is showing a preference for soups and other easy-to-swallow foods that don’t require much chewing. Two of her favorite meals are congee and chef Florabel Co-Yatco’s misua soup. This could be partly traced also to the fact that she’s teething. As per her daddy’s last count, she now has eight baby teeth.

“She also loves bananas and buto ng mangga (mango seed). In fact, she doesn’t like the pisngi (mango’s fleshy part). Gusto niya ngatngatin ’yung buto (she likes to nibble on the mango seed),” said Kho.

Scarlet, a spitting image of her father, is quite tall for her age, said Kho. At the rate she’s growing, it wouldn’t come as a surprise if she shoots up and becomes a ramp model or even an athlete in the future.

As a mother of two grownup children, Belo has been there, done that. When it comes to Scarlet, she’s decidedly more of the enabler compared to Kho, the disciplinarian and de facto head of the family.

Belo relishes the time she spends with Scarlet, said Kho. She’s always been great at time management, but much as she would have liked to spend more time with Quark and Cristalle before, she was also taking up medicine. These days, despite managing a chain of beauty clinics, she owns her time.

But make no mistake about it, “Vicki still takes being a mother to Scarlet seriously.” Nowadays, she’s also learning to submit to Kho, who’s becoming the authority figure over their unconventional family.

“Vicki gives me the privilege of having the last say, which I know isn’t easy for her because she has been her own boss almost all her life,” said Kho.

But having the last say also carries with it a big responsibility. Apart from being “deliberate,” Kho now has to act in such a way that he would be a good example to Scarlet, while also earning Belo’s respect. The challenge for him, “if I may use an unusually strong word, is to lead a noble life,” he said.

And what’s the couple’s wish for their daughter? If Kho would have his way, his dream for her is to be “a faithful child of God” and a blessing to others. He hopes that she would protect her name and surround herself with “godly” friends who won’t lead her astray. He would be a very happy man if Scarlet follows in their footsteps and becomes a doctor or a medical engineer.

“I hope she surpasses our achievements someday,” said the doting father. “Should she decide to become something else, that’s fine as long as she pursues an honest and noble profession.”
By Alex Y. Vergara Images by Noel Pabalate

Joel Cruz’s Royalbrood

The Lord of Scents talks about his little princes and princess, and how he hopes that one day, love would be enough.

Businessman Joel Cruz, a.k.a. the “Lord of Scents,” certainly knows how to make an entrance—from his outlandish outfits down to his children’s names. As one of the country’s leading perfumers, giving the public a glimpse of his fabulous lifestyle also comes with the territory.

Articulate and self-effacing, the self-made multi-millionaire seems to have a ready answer to almost any question thrown at him—until recently. “Daddy,where’s Mommy?” Princess Synne, the only girl in a brood of four, asked her father from out of the blue one day.

Cruz, 51, was initially taken aback. He knew that such a moment would come, but he didn’t expect it to come that early. His first set of twins, Princess Synne and Prince Sean, are now three years and seven months old, while his second set, this time identical twins, Prince Harry and Prince Harvey, are seven months old.


Joel Cruz and his twins

Cruz fathered all of them through surrogacy. The children’s surrogate mother, a 32-year-old Russian woman, also doubled as the egg donor. When Cruz brought home his first set of twins a few years ago, it dawned on him that he wanted a second set. He sought out the same woman, a dead ringer, he said, for Julia Roberts, from a Moscow-based company offering the rather unusual service not only because she’s tall, attractive, and healthy, but also because he wanted all his children to have the same mother.

“Synne’s question was not who her mother is, but where,” Cruz shared one afternoon in his home-cum-office in Sampaloc, Manila. “At first, I just kept quiet while I tried to think of something to say. Of the two, my daughter is proving to be the more talkative and inquisitive one. I had to say it right because she’s very impressionable. Once I say something, wala nang bawian (I can’t take it back anymore).”

While he was thinking of the right answer, a series of questions also raced through his head. Why did she ask such a question? Who prodded her to raise it? Did she see her classmates’ mommies at school, and wondered where her own mommy was?

“Then she asked me again,” said Cruz. “‘Where’s mommy?’ That was when I simply told her the truth that mommy is in Russia. She seemed satisfied with my answer, as I tried to divert the conversation to something lighter.”

But Cruz is aware that such an episode won’t be the last. It could be Sean, the more quiet and focused one, tomorrow. Before long, his second set of twins would most likely be asking the same question. Instead of losing sleep over it, he would rather focus on the here and now by showing “my children how much I love them.”

Cruz is aware that nothing could ever take the place of a mother’s love, but that certainly isn’t stopping him from being the “best single parent I could be.” Thanks to his mother and siblings, his four children are not wanting in love and attention. It also helps that Cruz graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Santo Tomas.

“Although I never got to practice it since I immediately went into business, first with my family, I have a somewhat clear understanding of the stages in a person’s development,” he said. “I know how to level with my children, to communicate with, and relate to them because of my background in psychology.”

As we did this interview, Cruz’s two older children barged in at around 4 p.m. fresh from school with plenty of stories to share with daddy. Synne was the first one to approach him with an embrace. When Cruz asked her to give him a kiss on the lips before she and her brother were to be herded off by their nannies to change into more photo shoot-appropriate clothes, the girl seemed to recoil for a few seconds before running toward Sean with a supposed bombshell: “Daddy has lipstick on!”

Cruz, who was ready for his closeup as early as 3 p.m., could only laugh. Kids, indeed, say the darndest things. They also don’t know how to tell a lie. Apart from explaining to them someday who their mother is, Cruz also needs to find the right words to tell them that their father is an openly gay man.

Since his life has always been an “open book,” Cruz is just looking for the right time to tell his children his true sexual orientation. Again, everything would depend on their level of maturity. His more immediate concern these days is the possibility of his kids being bullied in school because of their high-profile gay father.

“I know sooner or later that I would have to explain to them who I really am,” he said. “Bottom line, I believe what’s important is my sincerity and love for them. Even though there’s a big possibility that they might not ever get to meet their mother, I want them to feel that the love coming from me and my family is enough to fill in whatever is lacking in their lives.”

As someone who grew up knowing the value of hard work, Cruz claims that he’s also a disciplinarian. It’s never too early, he said, to teach your kids the importance of earning your keep, spending within your means, and saving for a rainy day. He also told his siblings as well as his adult nephews and nieces not to spoil his children and bypass his authority by giving in to their every whim.

There have also been times when Sean and Synne would hate to see their father leave for abroad or go on one of those marathon meetings. Cruz sees these situations as ideal opportunities to explain to them the importance of what he does.

“If I don’t go to work and attend to all these meetings, I tell them that we won’t have money to buy their clothes, pay for their school, and settle bills,” he said. “One time my daughter was asking me to go shopping. I said yes, but not before asking her where her money was. They seem to get it.”

It would be good, he said, if his children would join him in his business someday. If not, he won’t feel bad as long as they finish their studies and show enough passion and dedication for their chosen fields. He also wants them to be role models and inspirations to others.

“As early as now, I take my two older twins to certain age-appropriate charity and outreach programs my company is involved in. Apart from teaching them to share their blessings, I want to impress upon them how blessed they are. That they should never take anything and anyone for granted,” he said.

Cruz’s desire to have children didn’t just spring out of nowhere. Because he was fond of hanging out with his nephews and nieces, he knew he wanted to have kids as early as 20 years ago. But two previous attempts to have children through surrogacy using an American donor’s egg cell and a Filipina mother as a sort of incubator didn’t work.

 
VIDEO: Perfumer Joel Cruz introduces his twins ABS-CBN News ABS-CBN News

He had yet to hear of the Russian company then, and was instead consulting a Singaporean doctor who saw him in Manila. There was even a time when he underwent treatment himself because he had low sperm count. He attributed it to sleeping late and the daily stress of running a business.

“That’s why I was kind of depressed for a few years as I buried myself in work trying to make up for the huge amount of money I spent on two unsuccessful attempts,” he said with a chuckle. “After more than 15 years, I finally mustered enough courage to give having children another try.”

Unlike other countries, it’s perfectly legal in Russia for single parents like Cruz to resort to various forms of surrogacy to have children. The company he dealt with, he said, caters mostly to Europeans. It has connections with a network of doctors, hospitals, and baby makers who underwent thorough background checks.

Cruz, who grew up in a Catholic home, also claims to be very religious. When he was able to finalize arrangements with the Russian lawyer who runs the surrogacy clinic, he stormed the heavens with prayers to finally grant him his wish. The answer was positive this time.

“I haven’t closed my doors to having more children through surrogacy,” Cruz said. “But unlike in the case of Sean and Synne, I’m more experienced now as a father. I know better what to do. You can see this with the way I take care of Harry and Harvey. I’m no longer as overprotective and as paranoid as I was before. This time, I know better.”
By Art Sta. Ana

The Sumo Dad

Ricky Laudico proves that it is never too late to succeed in life, love, and family

He waltzed in cool, calm, collected. He had the confident aura of someone who’s in his 40s with the snazzy bravado of a twenty-something Millennial. He smiled when he reached out his hand for a handshake.

Ricky Laudico smiled. “Am I late?” he asked politely, his mocha coat blending with the bright new interiors of the newly refurbished John and Yoko Restaurant in Greenbelt 5.

He wasn’t. He never was, and in a way, this restaurateur and family man never will be.

Ricky is one of the owners of such gastronomic oases as Sumo Sam, John and Yoko, Mr. Kurosawa, and Akira. But more than that, he is a faithful husband to his statuesque wife Sheryl and a super dad to three kids: 15-year old Iñigo, four-year old Victoria, and three-year old Enrique. He tells of his life growing up, building his career and starting a family. But far from the inspirational stories of success as unattainable as the Epic of Gilgamesh, his is one of obstacles created not by circumstances but by his own internal struggles and overconfidence, familiar traits seen in most Millennials today.

An Early Millenial

Ricky is a middle child, son of a hardworking father who worked in real estate. Early on, he was taught the value of investing blood, sweat, and tears by his dad, who would constantly talk about what it took to take on life’s challenges and showed him how to be focused. He was never treated like a kid, and his father made sure he would be able to share the things he learned at work to him. He admitted, though, that it took some time for him to come into his own and get into something he really wanted to do.

“I was an outstanding student in grade school without studying, and in high school, even as I was going out with friends, I was still getting good grades. So I was overconfident going into college, which resulted in me not getting better grades,” he said with a laugh.

He studied at La Salle in high school and took up Advertising and Communications at what is now named as the University of Asia and the Pacific. But he was living the good life, enjoying the best of what the Manila party scene had to offer. He did take on several jobs, in TV production, the stock market, real estate. Nothing seemed to work though. He remembers a hilarious incident when he worked as a production assistant for one of the biggest TV networks in the country.

“I took a job as a production assistant in ABS-CBN, not knowing what the job entailed. So on my first day, I came in with my Linea Uomo jackey, Benetton polo, Cole Haan shoes, and a Hugo Boss tie. The people there thought I was a guest on (then-hit TV show) Palibhasa Lalake and was already ushering me toward the dressing room until I told them what I was there for,” he recalled with a chuckle. “Apprently, I was overdressed.”

It was not until after finishing his MBA at the University of the Philippines Diliman that he felt he needed to really start focusing.

“I was 32 and looking for a job. I was washed out.”


Ricky Laudico

Luckily, his dad was friends with former advertising icon Meckoy Quiogue, who was then with GMA 7. He encouraged Ricky to join them as an account manager. He felt this was his last chance. He finally became career-oriented, and his rise in the corporate world started. It was during his stay with GMA that he met Marvin Agustin, and it was during one of their long lunches together with Red Crab owner Raymund Magdaluyo, that the idea of opening up a restaurant at the sixth floor of Shangri-La came up. Not long after, the successful Sumo Sam group was born.

The Sumo Dad

When he was taking up his MBA at the age of 29, he met the beautiful Sheryl on a blind date. After years of taking it easy and after most of his friends have landed their planes on the tarmac of married life, he knew he was ready. And not a few months later, they tied the knot.

Their romance over the years brought them three beautiful children, the eldest is already in high school. As a father, he brought some of the lessons he learned from his dad and applied it to his own way of raising his offspring. He wants to prepare his children for what life has to offer, and he does this by imparting his wisdom to them just as his father did. He brings it to another level, though, as he makes sure to bring along his children, especially Iñigo, to his meetings for him to learn how to deal with people from different walks of life. Though he does not want to force any kind of career on the three, he at least wants to prepare them for whatever future they will choose.

“Imagine if I knew what I wanted to do early on. I would’ve been retired by now,” he said half-jokingly. “That’s what I want for them, to be prepared for life.”

An expressive and honest dad, he is his kids’ best friend. He is their cook on family days off at home, and their driver when they go to the mall. Yes, he is partly Sumo Sam, but to his family, he is fully Sumo Dad. He might have figured it all out late, but to his family, he figured it all out just in time.


PHILSTAR

The fathers of 1900 and the fathers of today BUSINESS MATTERS (Beyond the bottom line) By Francis J. Kong (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 18, 2016 - 12:00am 0 26 googleplus0 7


By Francis J. Kong

Weary and tired of constantly picking clothes up from the floor of her son’s room, a mother finally laid down the law: each item of clothing she had to pick up would cost her son P10.

By the end of the week, he owed her P120. She received the money promptly, along with a P20 tip and a note that read, “Thanks, Mom – Keep up the good work!”

Mothers do all the hard work at home. The more fortunate among them have helpers but most mothers without the benefit of household help do hard work in managing the household.

Fathers work hard too. They have to bring home the bread and butter. I know for a fact that there are more women entering the workplace and occupying leadership positions and doing very well in their roles, men are still expected to lead their families in the home front.

Celebrating Father’s Day tomorrow, I have this old material I have kept over the years that talk about the difference between the fathers of 1900 and the fathers of today. I reckon this material would be timely for the occasion.

Reflect on this for a moment and tell me whether it makes sense to you or not.

READ MORE...

In 1900, if a father put a roof over his family’s head, he was a success. Today, it takes a roof, deck, pool and a four-car garage. And that’s just the vacation home. And it looks like no matter how much they make it’s never enough.

In 1900, a father waited for the doctor to tell him when the baby arrived. Today, a father must wear a smock, know how to breathe, and make sure that the camera is fully charged.

In 1900, fathers passed on clothing to their sons. Today, kids wouldn’t touch Dad’s clothes if they were sliding naked down an icicle.

In 1900, fathers could count on children to join the family business. Today, fathers pray their kids will soon come home from college long enough to teach them how to work the computer and set the Play Station console.

In 1900, a father came home from work to find his wife and children at the supper table. Today, a father comes home to a note that says: “Jimmy’s at basketball, Cindy’s at gymnastics, I’m at gym, Pizza in the fridge.”

The times have changed indeed. Today’s fathers face greater challenges than before and specially those who are in the workplace. The term “downsizing” today is a Guillotine blade waiting to be dropped at a moment’s notice.

Today’s fathers, who are in business, struggle with words that rob them of peaceful sleep. The words are: “cash flow,” “business disruptions,” “changing demographics and consumer behaviors,” etc.

It’s not easy being a father, more so being a leader. In the workplace a leader has a position or a title that can help facilitate things. In the home front the father does not have a title but he carries the responsibility and role to exercise leadership.

Here is another material I have set aside just for this occasion.


GOOGLED PHOTO

WHAT IS A FATHER? Somebody says:

A father is a person who is forced to endure childbirth without an anesthetic. He growls when he feels good and laughs very loud when he is scared half-to-death.

A father never feels entirely worthy of the worship in a child’s eyes. He is never quite the hero his daughter thinks. Never quite the man his son believes him to be. And this worries him sometimes. (So he works too hard to try to smooth the rough places in the road of those of his own who will follow him).

A father is a person who goes to war sometimes... and would run the other way except that war is part of an important job in his life (which is making the world better for his child than it has been for him).

Fathers grow older faster than other people, because they, in other wars, have to stand at the train station and wave goodbye to the uniform that climbs on board.

And, while mothers cry where it shows, fathers stand and beam... outside... and die inside.

Fathers are men who give daughters away to other men who aren’t nearly good enough, so that they can have children that are smarter than anybody’s.

Fathers fight dragons almost daily. They hurry away from the breakfast table off to the arena, which is sometimes called an office or a workshop. There they tackle the dragon with three heads: weariness, works and monotony. And they never quite win the fight, but they never give up.

Knights in shining armor; fathers in shiny trousers. There’s little difference as they march away each workday. And when Father passes away, and after a good rest, he won’t just sit on a cloud and wait for the girl he’s loved and the children she bore. He’ll be busy there too... repairing the stars, oiling the gates, improving the streets, smoothing the way.

Don’t take this literally of course.

There’s no perfect place like God’s dwelling place but try to make every day Father’s Day. And show our love because they deserve it. Don’t forget to celebrate tomorrow and perhaps as much as you could every day.

To all the fathers out there, Happy Father’s Day!

(Experience two inspiring days with Francis Kong learning leadership and life skills in his widely acclaimed Level Up Leadership on July 18-19 at the brand new Shangri-La Hotel at the Fort. For further inquiries contact April at +639285591798 or Success Options at 7270291 / 7275692 or register online at www.levelupleadership.ph )


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim" EVERY THURSDAY OF THE WEEK.
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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