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PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

SOL JOSE VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
THIS WEEK
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

CHILDHOOD FAVES: MERIENDA CLASSICS
[PINOY FAVORITES THAT ARE SURPRISINGLY EASY TO PREPARE]


MARCH 31 -Arroz Caldo Literally meaning “rice soup” and served in many versions all over the country, Arroz Caldo has an equally famous beef tripe version: goto. There are sometimes debates on what kind of rice to use: ordinary rice, sticky rice, or a mixture of both. The basic rice soup starts with raw rice, stir-fried in vegetable oil until the grains turn opaque. Crushed garlic, slivered ginger, sliced onions, and a large pinch of kasubha (local saffron) are added and stirred for two minutes to release flavors. At this point, raw pieces of chicken are stirred in if preferred and mixed until chicken pieces turn white. Add three cups of water for every cup of rice, cover, and simmer over low heat. Stir every few minutes to prevent scorching. Season with salt and add more water as needed. The rice grains will continue to expand and absorb liquid as the soup cools. Serve topped with hardboiled eggs, fried garlic, and chopped green onions. READ MORE...

ALSO: Homemade Atsuete, Achiote or Annatto Extract
[FROM PINOY KUSINERO ONLINE  BY ENZ F]


Brazil and Peru are the major producers and suppliers of annatto products in the world. (Photo Credit: Sensatia Botanicals) Annatto
(Mexican/Spanish - Achiote; Hindi - Sindhuri; Malay - Jarak belanda; Filipino - Atsuete), one of the world’s most important natural food colorant that yields yellow to red tint, is derived from the seeds of the tropical tree “Bixa orellana Linn”. Such tree is also known as the “lipstick plant” as its seed extract is also popularly used in some countries as cosmetics and body paint.
The tree can grow 4 to 6 meters with pointed heart-shaped leaves. It has a white to pinkish flower and a brownish red, rounded to oval-shaped, spiny fruit. The fruit of annatto when matured splits into two to reveal its seeds. The seeds are numerous tiny kernel-like particles with red to deep orange pulp outer covering. These are usually powderized or steeped in oil, and the resulting extract is used as dye or food coloring. READ MORE FROM 'PINOY KUSINERO'...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Merienda classics Pinoy favorites that are surprisingly easy to prepare
[3 FAVORITES THAT ARE SOL's OWN RECIPE, HER OWN COOKING, PHNO KNOWS]


Arroz Caldo (YUMMY! DREAMY!)

MANILA, APRIL 4, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi March 31, 2016 - Summer is when Filipinos return to their hometowns, reunite with long-lost friends, visit relatives in ancestral homes, and attend school reunions.

These emotional gatherings are highly anticipated by city folks who look forward to traditional kakanin and merienda of their childhood.

Literally meaning “rice soup” and served in many versions all over the country, Arroz Caldo has an equally famous beef tripe version: goto. There are sometimes debates on what kind of rice to use: ordinary rice, sticky rice, or a mixture of both.

The basic rice soup starts with raw rice, stir-fried in vegetable oil until the grains turn opaque. Crushed garlic, slivered ginger, sliced onions, and a large pinch of kasubha (local saffron) are added and stirred for two minutes to release flavors.

At this point, raw pieces of chicken are stirred in if preferred and mixed until chicken pieces turn white. Add three cups of water for every cup of rice, cover, and simmer over low heat. Stir every few minutes to prevent scorching.

Season with salt and add more water as needed. The rice grains will continue to expand and absorb liquid as the soup cools. Serve topped with hardboiled eggs, fried garlic, and chopped green onions.

READ MORE...

To make goto, cook the basic Arroz Caldo but skip the chicken. Add the precooked, sliced tripe pieces when the rice soup starts to thicken.


Champorado

Many suspect that champorado is of Mexican-Spanish origin because its main ingredient is chocolate.

Basically a sweet, thick rice soup, champorado is often eaten with grilled or fried dried fish, preferably sardines (tawilis) or herring (tamban). As with goto and arroz caldo, there are debates on whether to use plain rice, a mixture of rice and malagkit, or pure malagkit.

To make the basic champorado, rice is simmered gently in water (one cup rice to three cups water) until grains burst open. More water is added to obtain desired thickness. Flavor it with white sugar and chocolate (powder, tablea, or syrup). Serve topped with milk (coconut cream, evaporated milk, or condensed milk).


Pancit Palabok

This is also known as pancit luglog because the rice noodles are refreshed by shaking, using a sieve in a pot of boiling water.

The term palabok refers to the ground chicharon (pork rind) and flaked smoked fish (tinapa) sprinkled on top. Pancit Malabon, which is a similar noodle dish, uses the same sauce but is sprinkled with oysters, shrimps, squid adobo, scallops, and clams.

Pancit Palabok is hardly ever made at home because of the false perception that the atsuete-colored sauce entails a lot of time and ingredients.

Filipinos overseas, however, know better. They serve Pancit Palabok at almost all gatherings. Their secret? Philippine-made mixes from Pinoy grocery stores.

I, myself, give Mama Sita Pancit Palabok packs to relatives and friends when visiting them overseas.

Other balikbayan favorites are Arroz Caldo and champorado mixes which take the guess work out. Simply open the pack, pour into a pot of water, and simmer while stirring frequently. It’s so easy, even a child can cook merienda! SOL VANZI


PINOY KUSINERO ONLINE  BY ENZ F

Homemade Atsuete, Achiote or Annatto Extract MONDAY, APRIL 14, 2014ENZ F


Brazil and Peru are the major producers and suppliers of annatto products in the world. (Photo Credit: Sensatia Botanicals)

Annatto (Mexican/Spanish - Achiote; Hindi - Sindhuri; Malay - Jarak belanda; Filipino - Atsuete), one of the world’s most important natural food colorant that yields yellow to red tint, is derived from the seeds of the tropical tree “Bixa orellana Linn”.

Such tree is also known as the “lipstick plant” as its seed extract is also popularly used in some countries as cosmetics and body paint.

The tree can grow 4 to 6 meters with pointed heart-shaped leaves. It has a white to pinkish flower and a brownish red, rounded to oval-shaped, spiny fruit.

The fruit of annatto when matured splits into two to reveal its seeds. The seeds are numerous tiny kernel-like particles with red to deep orange pulp outer covering. These are usually powderized or steeped in oil, and the resulting extract is used as dye or food coloring.

READ MORE...

The seed has two carotenoid substances called bixin and norbixin that are responsible for its distinct color. The substances work in the same way with beta-carotene, also a carotenoid chemical compound that produces the orange pigment in carrot.


"poor man’s saffron”

The planting of annatto trees is believed to have originated in the Caribbean and South America, and it is now widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions in many parts of America, Asia and Africa.

Currently, Brazil and Peru are the major producers and suppliers of annatto products in the world.

Annatto is a component in many dishes, soups and stews of Latin and South American cuisines. It is a well-known coloring agent in dairy products like cheese, butter and margarine, as well as in other food products like seasonings, processed meats, smoked fish, baked goods, rice and beverages. Its scent can be described as mildly peppery and the taste as slightly nutty, earthy and delicately sweet.

It is oftentimes referred to as the “poor man’s saffron” because it can produce the similar yellow to orange-ish color of saffron at a cheaper price. The flavor is not as pungent or spicy though.

Atsuete was introduced in the Philippines by the Spanish settlers when they occupy the islands in the 1500s.

Since then, it became a universal natural coloring and flavoring additives to a number of Filipino dishes.

It has become a very important component of pancit palabok (garnished rice noodles), kare-kare (stewed oxtail and mixed veggies in peanut sauce), adobong pula (red adobo) and chicken inasal (chicken barbecue).

Annatto is not a common grocery item in most European and American supermarkets. It is frequently available in native stores that specialize in Asian, Caribbean or Mexican spices and usually labeled according to their local names. They come in whole seeds, powder or oils. You can make your own homemade annatto oil extract using the dried seeds. Below is the easy step-by-step technique.

Homemade Atsuete, Achiote or Annatto Extract

INGREDIENTS: 2 tbsps. dried atsuete seeds (achiote or annatto) ½ cup olive/ vegetable oil OR ¾ cup water

PROCEDURE:

1. In a small saucepan, combine the atsuete seeds and oil on stovetop over low to medium heat.

2. Keep the heat to medium until the oil is shimmering hot. When the oil begins to bubble or boil around the atsuete seeds, turn off the stove. Make sure not to overcook or burn the seeds or it will create a bitter taste. Allow the seeds to sit in the oil for 3 to 5 minutes.

3. Filter the cooked annatto seeds with a strainer and transfer the oil in a separate container.  Discard the used seeds. If using water instead of oil, just follow the same steps.

Use the annatto extract as food additive or ingredients to any dish that calls for it.

TIPS FROM ENZ:

1, The extract of the seed steeped in oil is more potent than in water.

2. Allow the oil extract to cool down and place in a sealed container if you intend to stock it for future use.

3. The annatto oil can be stored for one week in an airtight container at room temperature and for several months inside the refrigerator. It is more advisable to make extract in small batches as the flavor and color would easily deteriorate.

HERE IS ENZ F:


The BLOG -http://www.pinoykusinero.com/p/about_1.html

Hello everyone! Welcome to my page, “Pinoy Kusinero …your Filipino cook and storyteller.”

My name is Enz F, a Pinoy yuppie and a passionate foodie. I am the brain and heart behind this blog.

Join me as I cook and bring the Filipino Cuisine near to you, the nearest possible I can. Let us dine before our eyes while I tell you a story or two about food and about life.


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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