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FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

SOL's EDSA PAST: FEBRUARY 25 - GUNS AND GOTO


STREET CRED Streetfood like goto were life savers for photographers covering the EDSA Revolution As stringer and field producer for several foreign news networks covering the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution, my duties involved everything, except handling the camera and reading the news reports on air. The main aim of every news team was to make sure a news report was shot, written, edited, and transmitted via satellite to the client’s home studio, which, in turn, would broadcast the piece. In order to achieve this, everyone involved had to be kept alive, safe, healthy, and well-fed. Hotel of Choice For the foreign press, there was never any argument about where to stay. The Manila Hotel had been the unofficial residence of visiting journalists since its reopening in 1976. It is close to Malacañang, has wide spaces for parking, and provides excellent views from all angles. It was the most prestigious address whether for a temporary residence or the Philippine Bureau of any international news organization. In February 1986, we all found out that the hotel was also an excellent refuge in times of crisis. READ MORE...

ALSO: Recording history: 4 days in February


FIRST HOURS OF EDSA – General Fidel V. Ramos (left) briefs Metro police officers who joined him in the first hours of EDSA 1986, led by Brig. Gen. Ernesto Diokno, Brig. Gen. Narciso Cabrera, and Brig. Gen. Alfredo Yson. (MB File Photo)
February 22, 1986, started out like the previous days. My husband Victor and I woke up at dawn to go to work; he was Philippine correspondent for CNN and I was renting out cars, cameras, and TV news gathering equipment to foreign TV networks. Because of the uncertain political situation, we were, along with our drivers and cameramen, on duty 24/7 and had to stay at the Manila Hotel, ready to run, out at a moment’s notice with our foreign press clients who were all staying there. We had equipment, cars, and crew servicing foreign journalists covering the aftermath of the Feb. 7 snap election, the result of which had Corazon Aquino and President Ferdinand Marcos both claiming victory.
That day, as with every day since the campaign began, I was to follow Cory Aquino around the country; she was headed for Cebu City to continue gathering support for her protest against the Batasang Pambansa’s proclamation of Marcos as winner. My travelling companions were Tom Breen of the Washington Times (I was a stringer for his paper) and my TV crew composed of cameraman Boying Palileo and soundman Ferdie Rosal. We rented a jeepney at the Cebu airport upon landing. We proceeded to Fuente Osmeña Park in the heart of the city, where Cory’s protest rally had gathered thousands. TV crews from NBC and CBS were there as well. Tipped by colleague... CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: From a Journalist’s Eyes - The life of a foreign correspondent the weeks before EDSA I


YOUNG SOL JOSE VANZI: The author, who was then the Philippine correspondent for ABC News A major foreign invasion of Manila happened quietly, almost unnoticed, after the August 1983 assassination of former Senator Benigno Aquino, Jr. Major American media organizations established Manila offices and news bureaus at the Manila Hotel to cover Aquino’s wake, funeral, and the subsequent daily hearings of the Agrava Commission investigating the sensational crime. Led by American Broadcasting Company (ABC) News, foreign correspondents made the Manila Hotel their second home. The Philippines was in the world news almost daily. International curiosity was fueled by the increasing number of theories on the identity of the killer, the motive, the health condition of President Ferdinand Marcos, and the suspected involvement of his powerful wife Imelda. As investigations and hearings dragged on, demonstrations against the Marcos government increased as did the number of foreign reporters, cameramen, and photographers. There was also growing suspicion that Washington was getting disenchanted with Marcos. Along with other Filipino stringers for foreign news organizations, I covered all the events related to Marcos, the political opposition, the rallies, and the activities of the Agrava Commission. We were all paid on a per coverage basis. No work, no pay. I was Philippine correspondent/producer for ABC News but, like other stringers, was not an employee. The daily demos and hearings were therefore manna from heaven for our kind. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Guns and Goto


STREET CRED Streetfood like goto were life savers for photographers covering the EDSA Revolution

MANILA, FEBRUARY 29, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN)  by Sol Vanzi February 25, 2016 -

As stringer and field producer for several foreign news networks covering the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution, my duties involved everything, except handling the camera and reading the news reports on air. The main aim of every news team was to make sure a news report was shot, written, edited, and transmitted via satellite to the client’s home studio, which, in turn, would broadcast the piece. In order to achieve this, everyone involved had to be kept alive, safe, healthy, and well-fed.

Hotel of Choice

For the foreign press, there was never any argument about where to stay. The Manila Hotel had been the unofficial residence of visiting journalists since its reopening in 1976. It is close to Malacañang, has wide spaces for parking, and provides excellent views from all angles. It was the most prestigious address whether for a temporary residence or the Philippine Bureau of any international news organization. In February 1986, we all found out that the hotel was also an excellent refuge in times of crisis.

READ MORE...

Mama’s Boys

Shepherding dozens of intelligent, temperamental grown men—many of them toasted as the best in their fields—could have been a daunting task but to me, it wasn’t so, perhaps because of the fact that I was married to one of them and, therefore, knew that deep inside they were all boys longing for good food and a mother’s attention.

So I listed their likes and dislikes, favorite food, allergies, sleeping habits.

My staff made sure they had formal Barong Tagalog for formal events and palace interviews, raincoats in case of rains and demonstrations, first aid kits, and medication.

We gave them lists of where to go, bars to avoid, and street food to stay away from. They were given wake-up calls 30 minutes before the scheduled take-off each morning.


cheeseburgers by the poo
Images by MANNY LLANES and BULLETIN ARCHIVES


breakfast on the run


fresh fruit to eat and pack


Fried chicken and beers at the Tap Room


Victory Champagne Room roast beef

As stringer and field producer for several foreign news networks covering the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution, my duties involved everything, except handling the camera and reading the news reports on air.

The main aim of every news team was to make sure a news report was shot, written, edited, and transmitted via satellite to the client’s home studio, which, in turn, would broadcast the piece.

In order to achieve this, everyone involved had to be kept alive, safe, healthy, and well-fed.

Eat and Run

To save time, breakfast trolleys were set up along the hallways with Danish pastries, fresh fruit, non-messy sandwiches, coffee, tea, and bottled water on them to eat and drink on the run or packed in bags for consumption all day.

Their cars were all equipped with ice boxes filled with ice, beer, bottled water, and individually packed cold towels.

To supplement hotel food on the road, we bought boiled bananas, fresh fruit, fried lumpia, fried bananas, and boiled eggs. We also had boxes of Sky Flakes, hard cheese, and pan de sal.

Poolside work

Returning from the field, reporters would hie off to the swimming pool to write news reports using Brother electronic typewriters over cheeseburgers and fries.

When the sun got too hot or rain started falling, everyone would run to the Tap Room to resume work.

Normally packed at night, the Tap Room was, and still is, a quietly elegant refuge during the day. Fried chicken with gravy was the most popular dish, eaten with beer or wine.

Champagne Room Victory

On Feb. 26, after spending the previous night walking in and around Malacañang Palace and working all day on stories confirming the departure of President Ferdinand Marcos, many journalists at the Manila Hotel were in a celebratory mood, feeling like the revolution’s outcome was a personal victory.

It was as good an excuse as any for a Champagne Room roast beef dinner.

Street Food

Meanwhile, street food was saving many demonstrators and local journalists who had to fend for themselves.

Goto (rice soup with beef innards) and mami (noodle soup) vendors kept them alive.

[PHNO NOTE: THIS WEBMASTER REMEMBERS WELL BACK IN 2000, MY BALIK-VISIT WITH SOL AND AT THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB THE FOOD WAS SUMPTUOUSLY SERVED THAT EVENING.  IT WAS THERE I TASTED A LOT OF SOL's OWN COOKING. WONDERFUL MOMENTS! OUR EDITOR IS A LIFETIME FOODIE, EVEN WAY, WAY BACK BEFORE THE WORD 'foodie' MADE THE ENGLISH DICTIONARY.]



MANILA BULLETIN BY SOL VANZI

Recording history: 4 days in February by Sol Vanzi February 23, 2016 Share75 Tweet1 Share0 Email1 Share104


FIRST HOURS OF EDSA – General Fidel V. Ramos (left) briefs Metro police officers who joined him in the first hours of EDSA 1986, led by Brig. Gen. Ernesto Diokno, Brig. Gen. Narciso Cabrera, and Brig. Gen. Alfredo Yson. (MB File Photo)

February 22, 1986, started out like the previous days.

My husband Victor and I woke up at dawn to go to work; he was Philippine correspondent for CNN and I was renting out cars, cameras, and TV news gathering equipment to foreign TV networks. Because of the uncertain political situation, we were, along with our drivers and cameramen, on duty 24/7 and had to stay at the Manila Hotel, ready to run, out at a moment’s notice with our foreign press clients who were all staying there.

We had equipment, cars, and crew servicing foreign journalists covering the aftermath of the Feb. 7 snap election, the result of which had Corazon Aquino and President Ferdinand Marcos both claiming victory.


At the end of 7 February, Marcos and his running mate Arthur Tolentino were declared the winners for President and Vice President by the Batasang Pambansa. Aquino refused to accept the fraudulent claims of the false victory. Within days, there were reports that several organizations also refused to support Marcos's victory, and left their posts. GOOGLE.CA SEARCH

That day, as with every day since the campaign began, I was to follow Cory Aquino around the country; she was headed for Cebu City to continue gathering support for her protest against the Batasang Pambansa’s proclamation of Marcos as winner.

My travelling companions were Tom Breen of the Washington Times (I was a stringer for his paper) and my TV crew composed of cameraman Boying Palileo and soundman Ferdie Rosal.

We rented a jeepney at the Cebu airport upon landing. We proceeded to Fuente Osmeña Park in the heart of the city, where Cory’s protest rally had gathered thousands. TV crews from NBC and CBS were there as well.

Tipped by colleague

CONTINUE READING...

While dining at the Cebu Plaza’s outdoor restaurant, a Filipino cameraman for a US network rushing out of the place brushed against my chair and pretended to be singing. “May nangyayari sa Maynila, malaking gulo,” he sang, winking at me.

The American correspondent running out with him did not realize I, a competitor, was being tipped off about the biggest news event in the world.

We ran to our rented jeep with all our bags and started searching the city for Cory’s group. Near the Magellan Hotel, we came across a convoy of cars with Cory-Doy stickers which we recognized from the afternoon rally. We tailed the convoy but it split up into two and we got lost.

We returned to Magellan Hotel to establish a base and secure a landline for contacting Manila. Opposition politicians decided to stay up and huddle all night, trying to figure out what to do, where to go, who to believe.

Assemblyman Homobono Adaza, who had unsuccessfully tried to impeach Marcos, contacted businessmen and political leaders to arrange for airplanes to ferry Cory’s group to Manila the next day. I did the same, rousing Pacific Air’s Rudy Isidro who was asleep in Manila. He said a plane was waiting for my group at the old Lahug airport in Cebu.

President Cory’s first presscon

No one was saying where Cory was, although we were assured she was on her way to the Magellan Hotel, where we expected her to react to what was happening in Manila. I suggested to my colleagues that her press conference be a formal event and not an “ambush” like we had been used to when interviewing her on the road.

The foreign press, including the New York Times’ Alice Villadolid (later to join Cory’s Press Office) put me in charge of physical arrangements for the press conference.


Cory_Aquino_(1986)_-_ITN.jpg WIKIPEDIA

When Cory arrived, she approved of her first presidential-looking press conference. There was a mini-stage and in front were rows of chairs, a microphone and several tripods for TV cameras. Kris Aquino was beside me throughout, wishing loudly that her Tita Lupita Aquino Kashiwahara were there.

Feeling victorious

Everyone dashed out to go back to Manila after Cory answered the last question. Our tapes, films, scripts and notes had to be developed, edited, written and transmitted ASAP. My group headed for Lahug airport as did Cory’s convoy. Our planes landed in Manila almost simultaneously.

I jumped out of the plane and into a waiting 8-cylinder car equipped with a rooftop platform which could safely carry three persons, mount a tripod and camera, enabling tracking shots while speeding at 50 mph.

Breen and the crew left to work at the Manila Hotel; they were replaced by a second crew and my husband Vic. We were all working for CNN at that point. Buggy Perdon, the cameraman, took his position on the platform as our car drove across the runway to catch up with Cory’s convoy.

Cory’s car windows were all rolled down; she was waving the Laban sign to pedestrians and motorists while our convoy’s horns were honking the Laban sounds: “Honk! Honk!”

It was like a victory motorcade and I could see Cory’s face lit up by a smile.

Cory’s close shave

Suddenly, the euphoric idyll ended.

A fleet of Philippine Army tanks appeared on EDSA as we drove down the Magallanes overpass, displaying Philippine flags blue side up, indicating loyalty to Marcos.

Thinking fast, I leaned forward and started honking the Marcos loyalist tune while ordering everyone to wave the Marcos victory sign at the tanks.

Buggy called the attention of the tanks’ occupants and aimed his camera at them. The soldiers smiled and waved back, also flashing the victory sign.

Startled, Cory’s group became quiet and took advantage of the soldiers’ distraction to roll their windows up. Reaching the EDSA-Shaw crossing, the tanks drove straight on EDSA towards Camps Crame and Aguinaldo.

Sleepless nights

February 23 and 24, not a single journalist slept.

We were up all night sending camera crews to EDSA to film the growing crowd; civilians were distributing sandwiches and drinks to soldiers; nuns and priests were leading rosaries and litanies. Many sang religious hymns. Candles lit up the highway. Young people with guitars broke out in song.

Local TV carried live pictures of events at Malacañang: generals loyal to Marcos gathered to show support; presidential daughters Imee and Irene with their spouses were shown dutifully listening to a visibly ill President giving orders to the military to avoid bloodshed, while a young Borgy, dressed in a soldier’s jungle camouflage uniform, walked around.


A group of young officers in the Armed Forces of the Philippines were making their own plans to overthrow the Marcos dictatorship. These officers were known as the Reform the AFP Movement (RAM) The RAM.s pleadings for reforms were ignored by Marcos and the AFP Chief of Staff, General Fabian Ver. They were harassed by the dictator and the military. Because of this the Reformists decided to force a coup de'etat was made by the organizers who were close to Juan Ponce Enrile. It was headed by Col. Gregorio Honasan, the chief security officer of Enrile. But Marcos had discovered their plot so they sought refuge at the Ministry of National Defense building at Camp Aguinaldo in Quezon City. Enrile took command of the military rebellion. General Fidel Valdez Ramos, the AFP vice-chief of staff and PC chief, sided with Enrile and the reformists and took over control of the Philippine Constabulary Headquarters in Camp Crame which is located across Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA) from Camp Aguinaldo. MARTIAL LAW BLOG

On the rebels’ side, networks all had camera crews and correspondents at Camps Crame and Aguinaldo, recording everything that Defense Secretary Enrile and PC Chief General Fidel Ramos were saying.

At the Manila Hotel, broadcast quality video recorders were wired into TV sets to record everything, which were later marked as TOA, meaning Taped Off Air.

Those recordings are now very valuable historical records, and have been digitalized for posterity.

Final day

By dawn of February 25, there was a general feeling of anticipation.

Aquino and Marcos had both scheduled to take their oaths as president at noon. Cory was to be sworn in at Club Filipino; Marcos scheduled his 5th oath taking as President of the Philippines at Malacañang.

I fielded seven cameras to cover Cory with me; two camera teams went to Malacañang.

The 10th, and best camera was assigned to a special, extra-ordinary mission to be carried out by Buggy Perdon, who was a Malacañang cameraman on leave at the time.

Buggy was perfect for the special mission. I had a feeling Marcos would not last at the palace another day, and had seen in my mind’s eye a video of the Palace after the president and his family leaves.

I ordered Buggy to go to the palace with his gear, as many tapes, batteries, water bottles and skyflakes as he and his soundman could carry. As palace staff, he had clearance to shoot anytime; security men were his old friends and he carried a Malacañang Radio-TV ID.

He was to hide until the Marcoses left, then shoot everything as the Marcoses had left them: the kitchen, bedrooms, dining room, etc, and then to position himself at the foot of the staircase to wait for what I had expected to be a rampaging mob.

Buggy did just that. His shots were bought by many networks and were broadcast around the world.


President Ferdinand Marcos was deposed in 1986 after a 20-year rule and died in exile in Hawaii in 1989 (AFP)

Days later, with Cory at Malacañang, the hottest videos and photos were of the Marcoses in Hawaii.

After chasing many leads, we bagged the plum prize – the first interview with President Marcos and his wife Imelda in exile.

But that’s another story.


MANILA BULLETIN BY SOL VANZI

From a Journalist’s Eyes The life of a foreign correspondent: In the weeks before EDSA I by Sol Vanzi February 21, 2016 (updated) Share186 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share233


Photo taken on November 3, 1985 after President Ferdinand Marcos announced snap elections (from left) Marcos, broadcaster Hermie Rivera, writer Cip Roxas, Press Secretary Gregorio Cendana, ABC News producer Sol Jose Vanzi (photo courtesy of Malacañang Press Office)

A major foreign invasion of Manila happened quietly, almost unnoticed, after the August 1983 assassination of former Senator Benigno Aquino, Jr.

Major American media organizations established Manila offices and news bureaus at the Manila Hotel to cover Aquino’s wake, funeral, and the subsequent daily hearings of the Agrava Commission investigating the sensational crime. Led by American Broadcasting Company (ABC) News, foreign correspondents made the Manila Hotel their second home.

The Philippines was in the world news almost daily. International curiosity was fueled by the increasing number of theories on the identity of the killer, the motive, the health condition of President Ferdinand Marcos, and the suspected involvement of his powerful wife Imelda.

As investigations and hearings dragged on, demonstrations against the Marcos government increased as did the number of foreign reporters, cameramen, and photographers. There was also growing suspicion that Washington was getting disenchanted with Marcos.

Along with other Filipino stringers for foreign news organizations, I covered all the events related to Marcos, the political opposition, the rallies, and the activities of the Agrava Commission. We were all paid on a per coverage basis. No work, no pay. I was Philippine correspondent/producer for ABC News but, like other stringers, was not an employee. The daily demos and hearings were therefore manna from heaven for our kind.

READ MORE...

My foreign bosses, who were based in our Hong Kong and Tokyo bureaus, practically lived full time at the Manila Hotel as there were little news of more importance elsewhere in Asia. An accountant explained to me that the company and the American staff both benefited from the arrangement in the form of income tax exemptions.

In October 1984, the Agrava Commission wrapped up its work and released two conflicting final reports. The majority report signed by four commissioners blamed Aquino’s security escorts. Chairman Corazon Agrava cleared the escorts and, in so doing, absolved the Marcoses of any involvement in Aquino’s death.

After the Agrava reports, anti-Marcos rallies turned violent and were strengthened by politicians who found courage in the sudden awakening of ordinary folk and civic groups. Foreign correspondents never ran out of stories to write. Cameramen and photographers were shooting everything.

Stringers like me never had it so good. We were working practically daily. Between rallies and occasional NPA encounters, there were press conferences by palace spokesmen and anti-Marcos groups, plus sensational hotel fires (Pines Hotel, Regent Hotel) which claimed the lives of many foreign tourists.

MARCOS PRESSURED

Freelancing was suddenly the in thing to do—selling exclusive photos, stories, and TV footage to the highest bidder.

Among the most sought after were shots of a shirtless Marcos undergoing a medical check-up, a visibly ill Marcos with blood-stained sleeves at a gathering of Asian Heads of State, Marcos with very visible belly scars indicating a recent kidney transplant.

By early 1985, calls for a snap election grew louder and spread nationwide, reported in depth by a new breed of small anti-Marcos newspapers, publications, and radio stations which would be known collectively as the “mosquito press.”

Soon, Marcos’ foreign allies were openly hinting at the need to legitimize, via election, the strongman’s extended stay in power. Meanwhile, the campaign to demonize the Marcoses concentrated on Imelda’s real estate purchases: luxurious residential estates for her children and four buildings in Manhattan.

Rizal Marte, a freelance broadcaster, leased one of my video cameras and borrowed a camera operator to shoot the properties in the United States. Marte produced a documentary showing the properties and documenting the purchases. The docu became the highlight of underground gatherings of anti-Marcos groups.

HIDDEN WEALTH REPORTS


PHOTO: Former Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. looks pensive shortly after being sentenced to death by musketry by a military tribunal in 1977 (left), and on his flight home from the United States on Aug. 21, 1983 (right), moments before being shot dead (center) on the tarmac of the then Manila International Airport. Inquirer Photos --(Upon his return from the United States of America on Aug. 21, 1983)

By 1985, leaders of the NAM (Ninoy Aquino Movement) in the US were joined by former broadcast journalist Orlando Mercado on another mission: leak documents on Marcos’ hidden wealth to media for publication.

One set of the voluminous documents, weighing at least six kilos, landed on the desk of ABC News investigative reporter Geraldo Rivera.

Another set ended up with the San Jose Mercury News team of Lewis M. Simons, Pete Carey, and Katherine Ellison

In August 1985, Rivera barged into Malacañang Palace to confront Marcos and Imelda on camera about the reports. The President denied everything. Imelda was in tears.

The Mercury News ran a series of exclusive articles on Marcos’ hidden wealth which later won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for International reporting. The citation reads: “For their June 1985 series that documented massive transfers of wealth abroad by President Marcos and his associates and had a direct impact on subsequent political developments in the Philippines and the United States.”

Rivera asked me to return the documents to his source, Mercado, who was an old colleague from ABS-CBN days. Mercado confided that the documents were “given by Washington” for Marcos opposition leaders to leak to American media. I congratulated him for the obvious success of their mission aimed at weakening Marcos at home and abroad.

ELECTION MEANT WORK

Several weeks after the hidden wealth reports went public, Marcos was forced to call for snap elections. On Nov. 3, 1985, trying feebly to hide his illness, Marcos announced there would be an election early the next year. His first date of choice was Jan. 27 but for unknown reasons, he changed it to Feb. 7.

Aquino’s widow was a reluctant presidential candidate whose entry into the opposition slate was challenged by veteran politician Salvador Laurel, head of the Comelec-recognized opposition party UNIDO.

Laurel later gallantly made the sacrifice of sliding down to the vice presidential slot in order to unite the opposition under one umbrella, supporting Cory as presidential candidate to challenge Marcos in the snap election.

During the weeks that it took the opposition to achieve unity, stringers were jubilant over daily assignments. The start of the campaign period also assured us of a steady stream of work days.

By December, all four US TV networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, and CNN) had decided to expand their Manila presence into full-scale bureaus.

ABC News moved into the Manila Hotel’s Honeymoon Suite. The other US networks preferred sprawling inter-connected suites facing Intramuros. Locals were hired as casuals to man the phones, and do clerical/messengerial work.

COVERING CORY


The author, Sol Jose Vanzi, who was then the Philippine correspondent for ABC News

It was obvious from the start that the foreign press leaned toward Cory Aquino, whose campaign was difficult to cover as she travel by private plane, hopping to a minimum of four destinations in one day.

An enterprising stringer decided to charter several 11-seater aircraft and sold seats, enabling foreign correspondents to cover Cory’s every stop.

Being with Cory was no assurance of a photo or story to sell.

The rallies began to look identical after a while. One day, Cory’s campaign stops and plaza rallies from Vigan to La Union were sparsely attended. The last activity that day was a motorcade around Baguio, which she and Laurel were planning to reach by helicopter.

Boldly, I approached Cory with the idea of going to Baguio by car and stopping for a photo-op at the foot of the mountain-side bust of President Marcos in Pugo, La Union.


Iconic snapshot of opposition candidates Corazon Aquino and Salvador Laurel below the giant bust of President Marcos carved on the side of a mountain in Pugo, La Union. (File Photo) Iconic snapshot of opposition candidates Corazon Aquino and Salvador Laurel below the giant bust of President Marcos carved on the side of a mountain in Pugo, La Union. (File Photo)

I explained the visual impact and symbolisms of such a photo. All the newsmen in our group were jubilant when Cory and Doy agreed. As expected, the photo and video were shown around the world and became an iconic illustration of the 1986 political battle.

LIVE VIA SATELLITE

The US networks wrote the Office of the President of the Philippines for a permit to install a satellite dish on the roof of the Manila Hotel to enable them to send via satellite any broadcast material, live or taped.

Plans were also drawn up for the star anchors of all networks to fly to the Philippines to air their nightly newscasts, live from Manila to the US.


Peter Jennings informing viewers of World News Tonight on April 5, 2005 of his diagnosis with lung cancer in a taped message. On August 7, 2005, just after 11:30 p.m. EDT, Charles Gibson broke into local news in the Eastern U.S. and regular programming on ABC's western affiliates to announce Jennings's death from lung cancer. WIKIPEDIA

For ABC’s Peter Jennings, NBC’s Tom Brokaw, and CBS’s Dan Rather to simultaneously broadcast live from a single place was a monumental event that would only happen very rarely, especially in the days of yore when satellite dishes weighed several tons and took weeks to ship.

The 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution was broadcast live around the world.

To this day, many questions hound journalists who covered the event.

Perhaps, in due time, the truth would slowly be revealed.


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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