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SOL JOSE VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

LOVE AND HISTORY
Three ways to celebrate Valentine’s at The Manila Hotel


Crystal palm leaves glow at the Champagne Room, Manila Hotel For more than a hundred years, the Manila Hotel has been the venue for some of the most memorable and significant social and political events. Since its doors opened in 1912, it has become not only the most historic hotel in the Philippines but the most romantic as well, a reputation enhanced by the world-acclaimed Champagne Room. Thousands of foreign delegates to the 1976 joint meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank gasped in awe when the restored Champagne Room was unveiled, setting an unmatched standard for 5-star fine dining in the country’s capital city. Oven-roasted sea bass caper in tomato butter Forty years hence, the Champagne Room’s glitter and glamour have not diminished. It remains a favorite for intimate dinners as well as festive gatherings of the rich and famous, especially during the holiday season and on Valentine’s Day. Menu for Love The dishes prepared for the Champagne Room’s Valentine’s season menu are full of love-inducing ingredients, beginning with poached lobster tail in zucchini ribbons with soy-yuzu dressing, followed by a refreshing seafood consommé with scallops, grouper, and prawns baked in crispy puff pastry. A very French preparation follows: foie gras in port wine reduction contrasted with roasted peaches. After, the fragrant, palate-cleansing rose petal sherbet is served. READ MORE...

ALSO: My colorful Family, the new normal? By Sol Jose Vanzi


Until given an assignment to write about a typical Filipino family, I never thought of mine as normal and typical.
The six-generation family story I know began before World War II, when maternal grandparents Lolo Andoy and Lola Tina left a Cavite rice farm to raise their six children in Las Piñas where they set up a caretela repair shop that became the world’s first jeepney factory after the war. Mom met and married Dad, rakish and debonair son of Palanyag (Parañaque) fishboat owners Lolo Pedro and Nana Ida.Their union was disapproved by both families for reasons I still have to uncover. Lolo Andoy was Aglipayan like most Caviteños of his time, while Lolo Pedro’s family was Saradong Katoliko and heard mass daily at the centuries-old old St. Andrews Church across the street from their seaside home. My two Lolos both sent their daughters to college while keeping their sons home to help in the family businesses, which floundered in the hands of the second generation. CHANGES BEGIN  READ MORE...

ALSO: Sol Vanzi at EDSA 1 - US forced Marcos to call snap polls


By Sol Jose Vanzi (PHOTO FROM http://www.slideshare.net/Alteveros/edsa-revolution-26388527) - Today is the 30th anniversary of what many historians consider the most important election in Philippine history, the 1986 Snap Election, which led to the ouster of strongman President Ferdinand Marcos and the installation of President Corazon Aquino following a military uprising supported by civilians and the Catholic Church. The EDSA People Power Revolution traces its beginnings to the Snap Election, which was announced by Marcos after months of pressure from political opponents as well as international allies. The announcement which surprised everyone, including members of the Marcos family, was made during a live interview via satellite on the ABC News program, “This Week with David Brinkley.” David Brinkley called me at mid-afternoon on Sunday, Nov. 3, 1985. When he ordered that cameras, microphones, lights and switchers be set up that evening at Malacañang Palace for the live guesting of President Marcos on his program, I replied that Marcos’ illness required him to be in bed by 8 p.m. “He will be awake for this one!” Brinkley assured me. It was not the usual way to arrange a presidential interview. In my many years as head of ABC News Manila Bureau operations, all presidential coverage, especially one-on-one interviews, went through the process of request letters, follow-ups, clearances and other red tape. I phoned Press Secretary Gregorio Cendaña to secure clearances for all the crew and equipment for the Brinkley interview; he did not know anything about it but promised to check with the President. CONTINUE READING...RELATED, THE ELECTIONS...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Love and history
Three ways to celebrate Valentine’s at The Manila Hotel


Crystal palm leaves glow at the Champagne Room, Manila Hotel

MANILA, FEBRUARY 15, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi February 11, 2016 - For more than a hundred years, the Manila Hotel has been the venue for some of the most memorable and significant social and political events.

Since its doors opened in 1912, it has become not only the most historic hotel in the Philippines but the most romantic as well, a reputation enhanced by the world-acclaimed Champagne Room.

Thousands of foreign delegates to the 1976 joint meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank gasped in awe when the restored Champagne Room was unveiled, setting an unmatched standard for 5-star fine dining in the country’s capital city.


Oven-roasted sea bass caper in tomato butter

Forty years hence, the Champagne Room’s glitter and glamour have not diminished. It remains a favorite for intimate dinners as well as festive gatherings of the rich and famous, especially during the holiday season and on Valentine’s Day.

Menu for Love


Poached lobster-tail in zucchini ribbon

The dishes prepared for the Champagne Room’s Valentine’s season menu are full of love-inducing ingredients, beginning with poached lobster tail in zucchini ribbons with soy-yuzu dressing, followed by a refreshing seafood consommé with scallops, grouper, and prawns baked in crispy puff pastry.

A very French preparation follows: foie gras in port wine reduction contrasted with roasted peaches. After, the fragrant, palate-cleansing rose petal sherbet is served.

READ MORE...

For main course, the choices are Australian lamb rack on Asian ratatouille with risotto or oven-roasted sea bass with olive-tomato tapenade and arugula-goat cheese risotto.


Strawberry cheesecake

Strawberry cheese cake touched with raspberry sauce ends the meal.

Honeymooners Again

This early, many couples are firming up plans to stoke the fire of love during the most romantic weekend of the year by booking a room at The Grande Dame. A few are even thinking of staying in one of the two Honeymoon Suites.

The Honeymoon Suite promo, for P19,000 NET, includes a special dinner under the palm crystals of the love-inspiring Champagne Room. Honeymooners, young and old, will wake up the following day with a buffet breakfast at Café Ilang-Ilang.

A bottle of wine, compliments of the Manila Hotel, awaits guests availing this promo. Booking period is until Feb. 14. Promo is only valid on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

‘Valentango’ Promo

This year, the Manila Hotel carries on the tradition of offering the very best with a special promotion in partnership with Moet Hennessey: “Valentango,” which starts with a romantic six-course dinner at the Champagne Room. The French-inspired dishes prepared by executive chef Konrad Walter are designed to sweep diners off their feet.

Adding to the Valentine ambiance are performances of professional tango dancers at the hotel lobby from Feb. 12 to 14.

“Couples inclined toward oriental dishes could choose to celebrate love and happiness over a lavish Cantonese dinner on Feb. 14 at the Mabuhay Palace,” says Dr. Enrique Y. Yap Jr., executive vice-president of The Manila Hotel. For P2,288 NET (Set A) or P2,880 NET (Set B) per person, a set menu has been heartily prepared by the Mabuhay Palace’s executive chef Sun Bing to satisfy cravings during this season of love.

02 527 0011 local 1175 to 1178 (room promos), 02 527 0011 local 1261 to 1262 (dining reservations)



VALENTINE DAY SPECIAL: SOL WRITES ABOUT HER FAMILY

My colorful Family, the new normal? by Sol Vanzi February 7, 2016 (updated) Share120 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share124 image: http://www.mb.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/bfg.jpg

Until given an assignment to write about a typical Filipino family, I never thought of mine as normal and typical.

The six-generation family story I know began before World War II, when maternal grandparents Lolo Andoy and Lola Tina left a Cavite rice farm to raise their six children in Las Piñas where they set up a caretela repair shop that became the world’s first jeepney factory after the war.

Mom met and married Dad, rakish and debonair son of Palanyag (Parañaque) fishboat owners Lolo Pedro and Nana Ida.

Their union was disapproved by both families for reasons I still have to uncover.

Lolo Andoy was Aglipayan like most Caviteños of his time, while Lolo Pedro’s family was Saradong Katoliko and heard mass daily at the centuries-old old St. Andrews Church across the street from their seaside home. My two Lolos both sent their daughters to college while keeping their sons home to help in the family businesses, which floundered in the hands of the second generation.

CHANGES BEGIN

READ MORE...


VIC VANZI and SOL at their wedding in Malate Church, Manila

My parents, uncles, and aunts decided six to seven children were too many and opted to have only three to four each. They also sent all children to school for as long as the kids could hack it. Boys and girls had equal opportunities.

Nationalism and patriotism were the two traits shared by my grandfathers, who were both born before the United States purchased the Philippines from Spain.

They shared the passion for independence and hatred for colonizers who ruled the Philippines one after the other. They both insisted that Tagalog be the language spoken in their households even after many family members had earned college diplomas and became professionals.

Little did my old-fashioned grandparents know that their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren would be Americans, Japanese, and Spanish just like the colonizers they abhorred in their youth.

THE FIRST FIL-AMS

The generation of my parents felt the urge to explore the world.

Uncle Manuel Jose sold Palanyag embroidered items to American soldiers outside the US bases in the Philippines, Okinawa, and Guam, becoming the first Filipino millionaire on the US territory in the Marianas. One of his sons-in-law is a Guam senator.

All Jose brothers, except my father, moved to Guam; I now have dozens of cousins, nieces, nephews, and grandchildren there whom I have yet to meet.

Mom’s younger sis Amor became a doctor and moved to the US with her doctor-husband in the early 1960s. Their children became doctors, nurses, and pharmacists.

Cousin Edwina, daughter of Mom’s teacher-sister, became a Fulbright scholar, married an American diplomat, and is now an English professor in Cleveland.

Cousin Zeny now posts photos of herself with children and grandchildren in Canada.

Uncle Ben’s son traveled the world as crew of ocean-going vessels.

My brother Tony did not let polio get in the way of becoming a professional musician, touring Asia with his own rock-and-roll band and settling down with his Japanese second wife in Osaka where he set up a restaurant-night club.

(PHNO note: Here begins Sol Jose and Vic Vanzi's family of children}

When they split up, I raised their son Hiroki in the Philippines with the help of my late husband Victor, a true-blue Californian who looked like Glenn Campbell.

After college, Hiroki reunited with his biological parents in Osaka where he now works and lives with his Malate childhood sweetheart and their three kids.

IDENTITY SEARCH


PHOTO FROM KYLE'S FB-"I do hope to have a reunion with my family soon. I do hope that we will have a picture like this. :-) with Mirasol Renolla, Anthony Jose, Mico Raphael Renolla, Andrew Jose, Sol Vanzi, Albert Jose and Karol Jose. [PHNO: KYLE IS THE ONE WITH THE GLASSES ON LEFT. HE IS SOL'S GODSON, TOO]

Also under our care were Tony’s four children by his Filipino wife. They went to OB Montessori and DLSU and are now all married with children. They visit once or twice a month to raid my pantry and freezer for supplies and homecooked meals.

My youngest brother Cris also has two families. His first wife, a beautiful and artistic hippie, managed my boutique and named their daughter after the business. Sulaiman, a professional event organizer, is now a single mother and a young-looking grandmother, making me a great grandmother. Sulaiman’s brother is a showman bartender who works aboard one of the world’s most luxurious ocean-going vessels.

By his second wife, Cris has two daughters who became very young single mothers. One graduated from nursing school but failed the licensure exam and now works at a call center. Her younger sister just got married to the father of her child.

GENTLE GENDERS

Last year’s big surprise for the family was the coming out of my 60-year-old spinster cousin, who finally revealed her gender preference via Facebook “It would have killed him,” she reasoned, posting her girlfriend’s photo shortly after her father’s death.

A physician cousin and his Latino partner toasted their wedding last year in John Travolta disco gear with the whole family in attendance in New Mexico. Unlike many of our relatives, he was never in the closet.

Another gay-inclined cousin was forced by her parents into a very unhappy heterosexual marriage that she probably will not get out of.

A female doctor in the family is very happy with her partner; her very strict, old-fashioned parents surprised everyone with their easy acceptance of the union.

TWO FOR THE ROAD

I dream of one day tracking down all the children my father had with numerous girlfriends. I met some of them when I was a kid and did not understand what the fuss was all about. No one answered my questions when Mom and Dad separated before I turned 10.


KYLE VICTOR JOSE --FACEBOOK COVER PHOTO

I tell grandson Kyle family stories during long bus rides when we backpack all over the country: broken homes, battered wives, double families, gay weddings, OFWs… we have it all.

Kyle takes it all in with a shrug and tells me it is the new normal.


SOL AT EDSA 1

US forced Marcos to call snap polls by Sol Vanzi February 7, 2016 Share202 Tweet2 Share1 Email3 Share237


GOOGLED IMAGE

Today is the 30th anniversary of what many historians consider the most important election in Philippine history, the 1986 Snap Election, which led to the ouster of strongman President Ferdinand Marcos and the installation of President Corazon Aquino following a military uprising supported by civilians and the Catholic Church.

The EDSA People Power Revolution traces its beginnings to the Snap Election, which was announced by Marcos after months of pressure from political opponents as well as international allies. The announcement which surprised everyone, including members of the Marcos family, was made during a live interview via satellite on the ABC News program, “This Week with David Brinkley.”

David Brinkley called me at mid-afternoon on Sunday, Nov. 3, 1985. When he ordered that cameras, microphones, lights and switchers be set up that evening at Malacañang Palace for the live guesting of President Marcos on his program, I replied that Marcos’ illness required him to be in bed by 8 p.m.

“He will be awake for this one!” Brinkley assured me.


David Brinkley -Nationality: American. Type: Journalist. Born: July 10, 1920. Died: June 11, 2003. David McClure Brinkley was an American newscaster for NBC and ABC in a career lasting from 1943 to 1997... (wikipedia)

It was not the usual way to arrange a presidential interview. In my many years as head of ABC News Manila Bureau operations, all presidential coverage, especially one-on-one interviews, went through the process of request letters, follow-ups, clearances and other red tape. I phoned Press Secretary Gregorio Cendaña to secure clearances for all the crew and equipment for the Brinkley interview; he did not know anything about it but promised to check with the President.

CONTINUE READING...

Within minutes, Cendaña was hurrying me to assemble technicians and cameramen and proceed to the new TV studio on the second floor of Kalayaan Hall.

“Test everything and bring a back-up set of equipment just in case. This is a very important interview,” he admonished.

At Kalayaan Hall, we were greeted by Malacañang close-in writer Cip Roxas, who remarked how lucky ABC News was to the biggest story of the year, showing me a press release dictated by President Marcos earlier in the day.

“The President was arguing with Washington on the hotline (a special phone on the president’s desk in the palace study room) arguing against proclaiming a snap election. The discussion ended with Marcos giving in, confident that he (Marcos) could beat anyone,” Roxas narrated.

Marcos turned to Roxas after the call and dictated the press release, which began: “President Ferdinand Marcos last night announced that there would be a snap election on January 27, 1986. In a live interview with ABC News TV host David Brinkley…”


U.S. President Ronald Reagan stands with President Ferdinand Marcos of the Phillipines on the South Lawn of the White House September 1982 in Washington, DC. January 01, 1982| Credit: David Hume Kennerly LICENCE

For weeks before the interview, American officials had been plotting to take Marcos out of the picture. American support for Marcos had started waning after the 1983 assassination of former Senator Benigno Aquino Jr. and a group of American officials was formed to explore ways to ease him out. One of these men was Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who advised Reagan in a secret report “to develop a policy to persuade Marcos to leave office.”

State Department professionals enlisted a close Reagan friend, Senator Paul Laxalt of Nevada, to go to Manila bearing a letter from Reagan. A few weeks after meetings with Laxalt, Marcos was on ABC News announcing snap elections.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian Stanley Karnow, in a March 1989 New York Times article, intimated that the TV interview had been scripted; the announcement had earlier been planned. Karnow confirmed that the live interview was pre-planned, that Marcos and Brinkley had known what was to be announced.


Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos (C) receives a kiss from his wife Imelda 16 February 1986, following his victory of the 07 February 1986 presidential elections, at Malacanang presidential palace in Manila. February 16, 1986| Credit: GETTY IMAGES-

“Finally, on Nov. 3, 1985, Marcos announced the election with contrived spontaneity on David Brinkley’s Sunday television show. In addressing the Americans directly on television, he sought to portray himself as a true democrat, as befit a Filipino raised under America’s benign colonial tutelage. For him, the United States, not the Philippines, was the main political arena.”

Editor’s Note: Sol Vanzi, veteran foreign correspondent and food columnist, was head of the Manila Bureau of ABC News from 1975 to 1986. She now writes for the Manila Bulletin.

RELATED UNblogged @ http://www.slideshare.net/Alteveros/edsa-revolution-26388527


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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