PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org


SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

TAPA, THE STUFF OF LORE AND LEGEND
[In celebration of the National Tapa Day on tomorrow, selected restaurants will offer buy one, take one tapsilog]


Tapa-ella (Images by Regie Mason) The process of preserving meat with heat and smoke is as old as time. Preserved meat sustained man during long periods of winter and drought and provided sustenance to hunters and travelers. So basic is the process that every culture has its own version of what we, in the Philippines, call tapa. Rendang and meat floss are very popular in Southeast Asia while air-dried meats and sausages are preferred in Europe and South America. Our own tapa is also woven into colorful lore, handed down through generations. Spinsters and Old Virgins Pindang is an old Tagalog word that is no longer used or understood except in very remote villages. It means beef jerky, dried meat, or tapa. It is the root word of pindangga, which means spinster, old maid, an old virgin. One persistent tale cautions girls against becoming old unmarried virgins: “A pindangga’s soul goes to a special purgatory where she is made to carry, on her head, a basket of dried male organs (pindang). The spinster’s soul cannot enter the gates of heaven until all her pindang is sold.”  Survival Method Pindang was a mainstay in our household which had neither running water nor refrigerator. Lola Tina, who fed 20 jeepney factory workers and 15 grandchildren daily, had such great survival skills. We never felt that her kitchen was missing anything that is now considered a basic necessity. Because she had no refrigerator, lola perfected dishes that did not spoil but even tasted better the next day: adobo, escabeche, kaldereta, dinuguan, bopis, paksiw, and pinangat. She preserved seasonal fruits and vegetables in glass jars and filled large tapayan (earthen jar) with burong mustasa (fermented mustard leaves). READ MORE...


Spicy shrimp pasta with butter tapa sauce (Images by Regie Mason)


Fish tapa-quitos cups with pico de gallo (Images by Regie Mason) ----ENJOY! READ ON....


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

HAPPY NATIONAL TAPA DAY! Tapa the stuff of lore and legend
In celebration of the National Tapa Day on tomorrow, selected restaurants will offer buy one, take one tapsilog


Tapa-ella (Images by Regie Mason)

MANILA, FEBRUARY 1, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi January 28, 2016 - The process of preserving meat with heat and smoke is as old as time.

Preserved meat sustained man during long periods of winter and drought and provided sustenance to hunters and travelers. So basic is the process that every culture has its own version of what we, in the Philippines, call tapa.

Rendang and meat floss are very popular in Southeast Asia while air-dried meats and sausages are preferred in Europe and South America. Our own tapa is also woven into colorful lore, handed down through generations.


Tagedashi tofu (Images by Regie Mason)

Spinsters and Old Virgins

Pindang is an old Tagalog word that is no longer used or understood except in very remote villages. It means beef jerky, dried meat, or tapa.


Chicken tapsilog sushi (Images by Regie Mason)

It is the root word of pindangga, which means spinster, old maid, an old virgin. One persistent tale cautions girls against becoming old unmarried virgins: “A pindangga’s soul goes to a special purgatory where she is made to carry, on her head, a basket of dried male organs (pindang). The spinster’s soul cannot enter the gates of heaven until all her pindang is sold.”


Baked sticky tapa with marinated wings with safron aioli (Images by Regie Mason)

Survival Method

Pindang was a mainstay in our household which had neither running water nor refrigerator.

Lola Tina, who fed 20 jeepney factory workers and 15 grandchildren daily, had such great survival skills. We never felt that her kitchen was missing anything that is now considered a basic necessity.


Tapa bacon (Images by Regie Mason)

Because she had no refrigerator, lola perfected dishes that did not spoil but even tasted better the next day: adobo, escabeche, kaldereta, dinuguan, bopis, paksiw, and pinangat.

She preserved seasonal fruits and vegetables in glass jars and filled large tapayan (earthen jar) with burong mustasa (fermented mustard leaves).

READ MORE...

She had ways to keep food fresh without refrigeration. Leafy vegetables had their stems immersed in clean water until it was time to throw them into the cooking pot.

Meats were either stewed immediately or salted and seasoned for later meals. Fish, which were not cooked right away, were salted and dried under the sun or smoked like tapa.

Lola’s Tapa


Tofu tapa dumpling (Images by Regie Mason)


Chicken tapa kebab rice  (Images by Regie Mason)

It is because she had no refrigerator that lola’s tapa was much better than anything available today.

Her secret? No chemical preservatives. No commercial marinades. Just a sprinkling of sea salt harvested from salt beds behind our home.

Her biggest secret was the way the meat was dried. She laid salted beef slices on loosely woven bamboo trays called lastay, which hung from the kitchen’s nipa roof, five feet above the wood-fired stove.

For many hours, the meat was dried and preserved by smoke. Vapors from everything being cooked also permeated the beef, making each batch of tapa uniquely flavored and distinct.


Tapa-style tofu salpicao (Images by Regie Mason)

Tapa Pa More

Tapa now includes salmon, prawns, quail, duck, pork, chicken, gizzards, and liver marinated in Knorr Liquid Seasoning, as shown at a world record-setting event where 100 tapa dishes were served.


Prawn tap chi rice (Images by Regie Mason)


Tapa buns (Images by Regie Mason)


Tofu tapa bibimbap (Images by Regie Mason)


Braised beef tapa short rib; and spinach, mushroom (Images by Regie Mason)

Tomorrow, Jan. 29, Knorr National Tapa Day will be celebrated nationwide. Two plates of tapsilog for the price of one will be offered by P&N Countryside Steakhouse, Countryside Sizzling House, Taps, Floyd’s, Tapa King, Rufo’s, and Merzci Bakeshop and Restaurant.


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2015 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE