PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org


SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

FORMER MANILA BULLETIN PHOTOGRAPHER TRAPPED IN DUBAI FIRE


JANUARY 1 -Former Manila Bulletin contributing lensman Dennis Borja Mallari was rescued from the 48th floor balcony of The Address Hotel in downtown Dubai. Filipino photographer Dennis Borja Mallari kept praying while waiting for rescuers to pluck him from the 48th floor balcony of The Address, Dubai’s prestigious hotel-residential building being engulfed by fire as fireworks lit up the sky to mark the beginning of the New Year. “Akala ko katapusan ko na, dasal ako nang dasal (I thought it was the end, I just kept praying),” the Candaba native told the Manila Bulletin hours after the incident. Mallari was perched on what he had considered a vantage position to photograph fireworks over the city at midnight. “I was shooting when the other photographer said there was a fire. Before I could gather my stuff to leave, thick black smoke had engulfed the room within seconds and I had no choice but to go out into the balcony again,” he narrated. “My cellphone saved me. I called the police number and informed them that I was stuck on one of the top floors. These were the longest 30-40 minutes of m life. It seemed like an eternity. Finally the Civil Defence reached me using the ladder,” he said, describing the ordeal. He also called his wife Dr.Cherrilyn Cruz Mallari and said he would make a rope out of the bed sheets and try and get out of there. Another plan was to use a cable wire to support him against the smoke. The former Manila Bulletin Malacañang photographer, who moved to Dubai ten years ago, now plans to return to the Philippines for a short visit with his wife and their 5-year-old daughter Felicity Azaliah. THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: The crockpot - 80 years of comfort food, convenience and savings


DECEMBER 31 -January is National Slow Cooker Month, in celebration of an appliance that continues to feed millions of households across the globe, 45 years after its first unit was sold and eight decades after its inception. The ancestor of what we call crockpot was developed in the 1930s by Irving Naxon, a prolific inventor, who was inspired by his Lithuanian grandmother’s stories about cholent (a Jewish stew) using the fading heat of the local baker’s oven to cook the dish overnight. Naxon integrated the crock inside a casing that contained the heating element, allowing for a “long and slow” cooking process. The appliance was called the Naxon Beanery. In 1970, Rival Manufacturing rebranded the Beanery as the Crock-Pot, and the rest is history. The original Crock-Pot sold about 80,000 units in 1972 and exploded to around 3.7 million units in 1975. At the market’s peak, about 40 different companies were making some kind of slow cooker. As of 2002, a Betty Crocker Kitchens study found that 80.6 percent of US homes have a slow-cooker.
Kitchen Workhorse Slow-cookers enabled women to maintain some semblance of work-home balance in the post-World War II era, when women entered the American workforce. Women could work a full day and have a hot dinner ready for their families. The convenience still makes the slow-cooker an attractive concept today. Slow-cookers have become a staple in the single adult’s kitchen as much as they ever were for a family. But convenience isn’t the only reason for the crockpot’s popularity. Efficiency was a particular asset during the oil crisis of 1973 and the energy crisis of 1979. A crockpot consumes the same amount of energy as an incandescent light bulb, far less than the electricity required to run a traditional electric oven. The promise of savings adds to its popularity. Love at First Try READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Former Manila Bulletin photographer trapped in Dubai fire


Flames rip through the Address Downtown hotel after it was hit by a massive fire, near the world's tallest tower, Burj Khalifa, in Dubai, on December 31, 2015. People were gathering to watch New Year's Eve celebrations when the hotel caught on fire, with the cause of the blaze still unknown according to the emirate's police chief. AFP PHOTO / KARIM SAHIB

MANILA, JANUARY 4, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN)  by Sol Vanzi January 1, 2016 - Filipino photographer Dennis Borja Mallari kept praying while waiting for rescuers to pluck him from the 48th floor balcony of The Address, Dubai’s prestigious hotel-residential building being engulfed by fire as fireworks lit up the sky to mark the beginning of the New Year.

“Akala ko katapusan ko na, dasal ako nang dasal (I thought it was the end, I just kept praying),” the Candaba native told the Manila Bulletin hours after the incident.

Mallari was perched on what he had considered a vantage position to photograph fireworks over the city at midnight.


Here's another Untitled photo from KICKER DAILY ONLINE

“I was shooting when the other photographer said there was a fire. Before I could gather my stuff to leave, thick black smoke had engulfed the room within seconds and I had no choice but to go out into the balcony again,” he narrated.

“My cellphone saved me. I called the police number and informed them that I was stuck on one of the top floors. These were the longest 30-40 minutes of m life. It seemed like an eternity. Finally the Civil Defence reached me using the ladder,” he said, describing the ordeal.

He also called his wife Dr.Cherrilyn Cruz Mallari and said he would make a rope out of the bed sheets and try and get out of there. Another plan was to use a cable wire to support him against the smoke.

The former Manila Bulletin Malacañang photographer, who moved to Dubai ten years ago, now plans to return to the Philippines for a short visit with his wife and their 5-year-old daughter Felicity Azaliah.


Sol Vanzi's TIMPLA'T TIKIM

The crockpot 80 years of comfort food, convenience and savings by Sol Vanzi December 31, 2015 Share22 Tweet0 Share0 Email1 Share23

January is National Slow Cooker Month, in celebration of an appliance that continues to feed millions of households across the globe, 45 years after its first unit was sold and eight decades after its inception.

The ancestor of what we call crockpot was developed in the 1930s by Irving Naxon, a prolific inventor, who was inspired by his Lithuanian grandmother’s stories about cholent (a Jewish stew) using the fading heat of the local baker’s oven to cook the dish overnight. Naxon integrated the crock inside a casing that contained the heating element, allowing for a “long and slow” cooking process. The appliance was called the Naxon Beanery.

In 1970, Rival Manufacturing rebranded the Beanery as the Crock-Pot, and the rest is history.

The original Crock-Pot sold about 80,000 units in 1972 and exploded to around 3.7 million units in 1975. At the market’s peak, about 40 different companies were making some kind of slow cooker. As of 2002, a Betty Crocker Kitchens study found that 80.6 percent of US homes have a slow-cooker.

Kitchen Workhorse

Slow-cookers enabled women to maintain some semblance of work-home balance in the post-World War II era, when women entered the American workforce. Women could work a full day and have a hot dinner ready for their families. The convenience still makes the slow-cooker an attractive concept today. Slow-cookers have become a staple in the single adult’s kitchen as much as they ever were for a family.

But convenience isn’t the only reason for the crockpot’s popularity. Efficiency was a particular asset during the oil crisis of 1973 and the energy crisis of 1979. A crockpot consumes the same amount of energy as an incandescent light bulb, far less than the electricity required to run a traditional electric oven. The promise of savings adds to its popularity.



Love at First Try

READ MORE...

When a crockpot came as a wedding gift 40 years ago, I had to read the appliance brochure over and over before attempting to make pot roast as instructed by the cookbook that came with the appliance. Ever adventurous, I substituted red wine for some of the liquid required and stirred in corn starch slurry to make gravy from the sauce in the pot.

We were living in Hong Kong and it was our turn to host Christmas Eve dinner for bachelor foreign correspondents. Pot roast with potatoes, noodles, and cabbage gave our homesick colleagues just the right touch of home. The serving dish looked like we were serving roast beef although, in reality, I had used the much cheaper (and tougher) brisket.

Slow-Cooked Pinoy Dishes


CHICKEN ADOBO

A bigger crockpot became our daily savior while raising five children after moving to Manila. My husband and I were both foreign correspondents, covering the most historic events of our generation and it helped that our kids were assured of good, hot food in the crockpot when they got home from school.

The appliance was designed for adobo and for tenderizing tripe for callos and kare-kare, pig trotters for pata tim, beef ribs for kaldereta, and cheap old hens for chicken a la king. I even use it for fish paksiw, sinaing na tulingan, ginataang langka, and dinuguan. And when baby bangus flooded the market, I made bangus sardines in corn oil and chili using it.


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD
Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
http://www.mb.com.ph/lifestyle/


Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet
office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2015 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE