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 http://newsflash.org  | NOVEMBER 18 -19, 2015

SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

'WALA LANG II' -  A DARN GOOD READ
[A collection of stories, thinkpieces, and essays from a master storyteller and Renaissance man]


 NOVEMBER 16 -Dr. Jaime Laya --(By Sol Vanzi) When Wala Lang II, a collection of columns written by Dr. Jaime Laya, was launched at the Manila Hotel, Manila’s elite turned out for the event: members of the diplomatic corps, leaders of the academe, scholars, pillars of the business world, heritage conservationists, church activists, headline makers, and headline writers. The well-dressed crowd reflected the author’s own kaleidoscopic career. MANY LIVES A Certified Public Accountant by profession, Dr. Laya has worked successively in academe, management consulting, government, audit practice, culture and the arts, and banking. He also serves as director or trustee of varied organizations—in real estate, insurance, showbiz, education, museums, and religious organizations. In his past life as public servant, Dr. Laya served as budget minister, minister of Education and Culture, Central Bank governor, chairman of the Monetary Board, chairman of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, as well as action officer of the Intramuros Administration. Before becoming chairman of the University of the Philippines, he was first professor of Business Administration and later dean of the College of Business Administration. PROLIFIC AUTHOR The list of books he has authored reveals a lot about his colorful life and diverse interests; he wrote two on Fiscal Management and Finance, three on Money and Banking, two on Education, and nine on Culture. While the others are must-reads for professionals, the books on culture are invaluable companions for amateur historians and researchers alike. For instance, there are Intramuros of Memory written with Esperanza Gatbonton, and Prusisyon: Philippine Religious Pageantry written with Lourdes Tesoro Castañeda. Both are replete with details unknown to even devout church goers. He merged his two passions in the book Letras y Figuras: Culture in Business; Business in Culture, which was awarded by Manila Critics’ Circle as Best Collection of Essays in 2001. READ MORE...

ALSO From Wikipedia: Jaime C. Laya


Jaime C. Laya was the first Secretary of the Department of Budget and Management of the Republic of the Philippines, serving from 1975 to 1981. He was also the 5th governor of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas from 1981 to 1984. Succeeded by: Jose B. Fernandez, Jr. WIKIPEDIA...Education Laya graduated magna cum laude with a degree in business administration from the University of the Philippines in 1957. Later, he took up a master's degree in industrial management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He did his graduate studies in finance at the Stanford Graduate School of Business of Stanford University in California, US, from which he graduated with a Ph.D. in 1965.  Professional career Laya started off teaching accounting, economics and management courses at UP after his graduation in 1957. At the age of 18, he placed eighth in the 1957 CPA examination. Laya served numerous positions in different government agencies. He rose to the rank of professor of accounting and director of graduate studies at the University of the Philippines Diliman College of Business Administration. He became dean of the same college from 1968-1975, succeeding Dean Cesar E.A. Virata.Government service He served as Minister of Budget from 1975 to 1981 and became the Central Bank Governor from 1981 to 1984, and was the Minister of Education, Culture and Sports from 1984 to 1986. He also served as cchairman of the National Commission of Culture and Arts from 1996 to 2001 and former chairman of the Intramurous Administration. At present, he serves as a treasurer for the Opera Guild of the Philippines. In 2010, President Aquino appointed Laya, along with pianist Raul Sunico, and architect Maria Cristina Turalba, as one of the board of trustees of Cultural Center of the Philippines.READ FROM THE BEGINNING...

ALSO Interview: The art of appreciation
[‘In case of doubt, I buy.’ A former Central Banker and his painting collection.] INTERVIEW SAM L. MARCELO | PHOTOGRAPHY JUN PINZON


Former Central Bank governor Jaime C. Laya is a man of many passions. He is the proud owner of a couple of ngipin ng kidlat (“lightning’s tooth”), 4,000-or-so-year-old stone adzes, and the original typewritten manuscript of Arthur Rigg’s book on the Filipino “seditious drama” written in 1905 that he bought in Washington D.C. for US$10.
His major collecting interests, though, are Philippine books, paintings and santos that he collects as sculpture. He likes to say that he has “a little of a whole range of stuff”—maps, engravings, photographs, textiles, antique jewelry, furniture, and excavated ceramics. “Name it and I probably have one or two.” Mr. Laya also has quite a few paintings, mostly small works from unknown icon painters of the 18th and 19th centuries to a piece painted by a senior fine arts student. READ FULL HIGH-LIFE INTERVIEW....

ALSO Watch: VIDEO 'WALA LANG II' BOOK LAUNCHING


Published on Nov 10, 2015 --Wala Lang II book launch was held at the Pandanggo/Polkabal Ballroom at the Manila Hotel last November 9.
'Wala Lang II is a unique collection of 500-word articles on Philippine life and culture of the Manila Bulletin.
SCROLL DOWN TO WATCH VIDEO...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

'Wala lang II' - a darn good read


 Dr. Jaime Laya

MANILA, NOVEMBER 23, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi - When Wala Lang II, a collection of columns written by Dr. Jaime Laya, was launched at the Manila Hotel, Manila’s elite turned out for the event: members of the diplomatic corps, leaders of the academe, scholars, pillars of the business world, heritage conservationists, church activists, headline makers, and headline writers.

The well-dressed crowd reflected the author’s own kaleidoscopic career.

MANY LIVES

A Certified Public Accountant by profession, Dr. Laya has worked successively in academe, management consulting, government, audit practice, culture and the arts, and banking. He also serves as director or trustee of varied organizations—in real estate, insurance, showbiz, education, museums, and religious organizations.

In his past life as public servant, Dr. Laya served as budget minister, minister of Education and Culture, Central Bank governor, chairman of the Monetary Board, chairman of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, as well as action officer of the Intramuros Administration.

Before becoming chairman of the University of the Philippines, he was first professor of Business Administration and later dean of the College of Business Administration.

PROLIFIC AUTHOR


Department of Tourism. October 26, 2011 --Tourism Secretary Ramon R. Jimenez, Jr. during the book relaunch of “Intramuros of Memory,” authored by Dr. Jaime C. Laya and Esperanza B. Gatbonton. The book is published by the Intramuros Administration, an attached agency of the Department of Tourism. Photo courtesy of www.gov.ph

The list of books he has authored reveals a lot about his colorful life and diverse interests; he wrote two on Fiscal Management and Finance, three on Money and Banking, two on Education, and nine on Culture.

While the others are must-reads for professionals, the books on culture are invaluable companions for amateur historians and researchers alike.

For instance, there are Intramuros of Memory written with Esperanza Gatbonton, and Prusisyon: Philippine Religious Pageantry written with Lourdes Tesoro Castañeda. Both are replete with details unknown to even devout church goers.

He merged his two passions in the book Letras y Figuras: Culture in Business; Business in Culture, which was awarded by Manila Critics’ Circle as Best Collection of Essays in 2001.

READ MORE...

Culture, history, art, and religion figure in Consuming Passions: Philippine Collectibles was awarded Best Anthology in 2013 by the Manila Critics’ Circle.

PAIN AND PLEASURE

At the launch, Dr. Laya shared his feelings on column writing.

“Much of a columnist’s agony occurs when thinking of what to write to meet the normally immovable deadline. The broader the column’s scope, the lesser the agony,” he intimated.

He also shared his concerns.

“In addition to work, I worry about traffic, DPWH digging up my street for two months now; aching back, weak knees; Kim Henares; bullets in my luggage.”

Much of what distracts him land as topics in his columns: Alfredo Roca’s maps and Scarborough Shoal, people and places, grandchildren, dinner benefits, budgeting, and PDAF.

WORTHY CAUSE

Always concerned about the country’s young, Dr. Laya’s boon sales, after printing and design costs, will go toward the improvement of art and culture appreciation among the young, through the Society for Cultural Enrichment, Inc. which published the book.

The Society’s president, Consul Helen Ong, aptly describes Wala Lang II as a “diary of Philippine history.” Perhaps because it deals with the country’s past, present, and future through essays written in easy-to-read prose penned by a man of letters.

Asked to describe Dr. Jaime Laya, former First Lady Imelda Marcos was unusually speechless, groping for the right words.

“A Renaissance man,” she finally blurted. And she was spot on.


WIKIPEDIA

Jaime C. Laya


Jaime C. Laya was the first Secretary of the Department of Budget and Management of the Republic of the Philippines, serving from 1975 to 1981. He was also the 5th governor of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas from 1981 to 1984. Wikipedia Succeeded by: Jose B. Fernandez, Jr.

Department of Budget and Management of the Philippines
In office: 1975–1981
President Ferdinand Marcos
Preceded by Position created
Succeeded by Manuel Alba

5th Governor of the Central Bank of the Philippines
In office
1981–1984
President Ferdinand Marcos
Preceded by Gregorio Licaros
Succeeded by Jose B. Fernandez, Jr.

Personal details

Profession Banker
Jaime C. Laya was the first Secretary of the Department of Budget and Management (as Minister of Budget) of the Republic of the Philippines, serving from 1975 to 1981. He was also the 5th governor of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (Central Bank of the Philippines) from 1981 to 1984.[1] His term covered two significant points in Philippine history, the "election" that made former President Ferdinand Marcos have his third term and the assassination of the late Senator Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. that stimulated the People Power Revolution of 1986.

He also served as the Dean of the College of Business Administration, now the Cesar E.A. Virata School of Business, of the University of the Philippines Diliman.

Education
Laya graduated magna cum laude with a degree in business administration from the University of the Philippines in 1957. Later, he took up a master's degree in industrial management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He did his graduate studies in finance at the Stanford Graduate School of Business of Stanford University in California, US, from which he graduated with a Ph.D. in 1965.

Professional career
Laya started off teaching accounting, economics and management courses at UP after his graduation in 1957. At the age of 18, he placed eighth in the 1957 CPA examination. Laya served numerous positions in different government agencies. He rose to the rank of professor of accounting and director of graduate studies at the University of the Philippines Diliman College of Business Administration. He became dean of the same college from 1968-1975, succeeding Dean Cesar E.A. Virata.

Government service
He served as Minister of Budget from 1975 to 1981 and became the Central Bank Governor from 1981 to 1984, and was the Minister of Education, Culture and Sports from 1984 to 1986. He also served as cchairman of the National Commission of Culture and Arts from 1996 to 2001 and former chairman of the Intramurous Administration.

At present, he serves as a treasurer for the Opera Guild of the Philippines. In 2010, President Aquino appointed Laya, along with pianist Raul Sunico, and architect Maria Cristina Turalba, as one of the board of trustees of Cultural Center of the Philippines.

Private sector
After retiring from public office in 1986, Laya went on to found the founded J.C. Laya and Co., Ltd., which was later renamed Laya Mananghaya and Co. Laya served as chairman of the firm until his retirement in 2004. He was the chairman and president of the Association of Certified Public Accounts in Public Practice (ACPAPP) in 2003 and ACAPP Foundation, Inc. in 2004.

He is the chairman of the publicly listed and Emilio Yap-owned Philtrust Bank, CIBI Information, Inc., Dual Tech Foundation, Inc and Don Norberto Ty Foundation. Laya serves as Director for Victorias Milling Company, Inc., Philippine AXA Life Insurance Company, Manila Polo Club and GMA Network, Inc. Philippine Ratings Services Corporation, Philippines-Mexico Business Council, and Philippines-Spain Business Council. He is a trustee for De La Salle University Manila, St. Paul University, Metropolitan Museum of Manila, Yuchengco Museum, Heart Foundation of the Philippines, Inc., Fundacion Santiago, ABS-CBN Foundation, Inc., Dañgal ng Bulacan Foundation, Cofradia de la Immaculada Concepcion.

International career
Laya was also the president of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Council from 1985 to 1986 and chairman of the Ad Hoc Working Group on International Standards of Accounting and Reporting of the United Nations Centeron Transnational Corporations from 1980 to 1983. He also chaired the Philippine Delegations to the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, the Southeast Asian Central Banks Association, and the United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO).

FROM BLOOMBERG

Executive Profile: Jaime C. Laya CPA, Ph.D. Chairman, President, Chairman of Corporate Governance Committee, Chairman of Executive Committee and Member of Trust & Investment Committee, Philtrust Bank Age Total Calculated Compensation This person is connected to 8 Board Members in 8 different organizations across 8 different industries.

See Board Relationships 76 -- Background Dr. Jaime C. Laya, CPA, Ph.D. serves as Treasurer of Opera Guild of the Philippines. Mr. Laya is the Founder and serves as the Chairman Emeritus of KPMG/Laya Mananghaya & Co. Mr. Laya has been President of Philtrust Bank since April 25, 2012. He served as the Governor of Central Bank of the Philippines, from 1981 to 1984, Minister of the Budget from 1975 to 1981 and Minister of Education, Culture and Sports from 1984 to 1986. He served as Deputy Director General of the ... Read Full Background


BUSINESS WORLD (HIGH-LIFE INTERVIEW)

17 Jul

The art of appreciation
‘In case of doubt, I buy.’ A former Central Banker and his painting collection.

INTERVIEW SAM L. MARCELO | PHOTOGRAPHY JUN PINZON

Former Central Bank governor Jaime C. Laya is a man of many passions. He is the proud owner of a couple of ngipin ng kidlat (“lightning’s tooth”), 4,000-or-so-year-old stone adzes, and the original typewritten manuscript of Arthur Rigg’s book on the Filipino “seditious drama” written in 1905 that he bought in Washington D.C. for US$10.

His major collecting interests, though, are Philippine books, paintings and santos that he collects as sculpture. He likes to say that he has “a little of a whole range of stuff”—maps, engravings, photographs, textiles, antique jewelry, furniture, and excavated ceramics. “Name it and I probably have one or two.” Mr. Laya also has quite a few paintings, mostly small works from unknown icon painters of the 18th and 19th centuries to a piece painted by a senior fine arts student.

HL : Why collect art?

JL : To have something to hang on the wall, that’s why.

The first painting I bought was a street scene by Cesar Buenaventura for my U.P. College of Business office that cost P35. Then my wife and I were given an Amorsolo farm scene as a wedding gift. It first hung in our Diliman rowhouse living room, then over the dining room sideboard and later in our bedroom when we moved to a real house. I got a co-professor to take me to H.R. Ocampo’s home in Caloocan and got me a nice work for the sala. For the longest time I maneuvered to sit beside Jose Joya at meetings and finally got him to paint me something in pink for our little girl’s room. I just couldn’t stop even when we ran out of walls.

HL : Do you have a favorite?

JL : I have plenty of favorites, each for a reason. I like some because they remind me of the artist. Galo Ocampo sold me the watercolor study of his famous Brown Madonna and Mang Enteng Manansala sold me a still life because Mrs. K, to whom it was promised, didn’t show up on time—she didn’t speak to me for years. Another recalls a happy day—a Jaime de Guzman oil of a seashell vendor near Dumaguete. A Tony Austria of a man snoring away in the shade of an upo trellis is perfect over my bed. A rural street scene reminds me of my Lola Trining—she got it from an amateur painter-friend. I like my one-and-only letras y figuras because it took forever to find it. Another painting makes me smile, a Guy Custodio of the Nativity set in Bohol with the three Magi arriving by boat—one of them via vinta along with his harem.

HL : When it comes to your own collection, do you stick to the same acquisition guidelines you set for the Central Bank?

JL : I aim for quality, yes, and to have just a few important pieces. However, I don’t limit myself to recognized masters and since my house can easily fit within a BSP lobby, I have only a couple of large pieces that in any case are still unhung.

One is more flexible in private collecting. I have works of average quality but which are charming or that I simply could not resist. I have a few nudes (they’re in the bathroom). Also, one never knows what will or will not come up. In case of doubt, I buy—pocket willing, that is. My house is already at full capacity and I have a long-standing resolution only to upgrade—buy something only if it’s better than what I already have and sell the older one. More often than not, I end up keeping both.

I don’t go for paintings that have only shock value, novelty and/or technique.

HL : Any art-related regrets?

JL : Quite a few things “got away” because I couldn’t afford them. One piece that didn’t get away was a beautiful 19th-century still life. I was hesitating between that and a Manila Golf share that cost just a bit more. I decided on the painting since I didn’t play golf (although I was thinking of learning) and I figured the painting was unique while the golf share was not. Every time I look at the santol and atis, I think of the umpty millions that a Manila Golf share is now worth.

Another time, I felt so guilty buying an irresistible super-costly work (a 1948 H.R. Ocampo) that I sold four small works by the same artist to pay for it. I came down with a bad case of seller’s remorse immediately.

HL : Art as investment—yea or nay?

JL : In general, art works appreciate nicely. However, one can never be too sure. Some artists are like flashes in the pan—they do something spectacular and then are never heard of again. Some are expertly promoted and command stratospheric prices, but only for a while.

Unlike equities or fixed income securities or real estate, paintings have uncertain fundamentals comparable to profitability and liquidity in the case of stocks or debt instruments. There are more unknowns in gauging potential financial return on art investments. To begin with, there is a big gap between buying and selling prices (I understand gallery commissions are 30-50%). Tastes change and price can drop. Then there are fakes and fads. It’s incredible that some new artists command prices higher than works of National Artists or even Lunas and Hidalgos.

I could afford to buy good works of already-recognized artists when I was a U.P. assistant professor, like the large H.R. Ocampo that was in our sala for the longest time (it’s now in my son’s home in Singapore), for less than a month’s salary.

HL : Any tips for collectors?

JL : I frequented art shows to train my eye and taste, observed what others liked, read art critics (who wrote about the works and why they liked or disliked them), talked to knowledgeable people.

In other words, know what is good and bad before buying. It’s risky to spend on a painting simply because everybody wants the artist’s work. Even the best artists have bad days. One can also get taken in by hype and marketing gimmicks. It’s best to be an informed buyer and decide on that basis. Add to your collection what you like and can live with; financial returns is a nice extra.


VIDEO 'WALA LANG II BOOK LAUNCHING

 
https://youtu.be/wwtKbdXY9ME

Published on Nov 10, 2015
Wala Lang II book launch was held at the Pandanggo/Polkabal Ballroom at the Manila Hotel last November 9.
'Wala Lang II is a unique collection of 500-word articles on Philippine life and culture of the Manila Bulletin.


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Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin.
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