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SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

HAVE CHEESE, WILL PARTY
[A sought-after brand of natural dairy products has finally landed on Philippine shores. Last week, we celebrated this top news on the food front: natural cheeses from the world’s largest dairy company, Arla, have begun to appear on supermarket shelves. Retailing at very competitive prices, Arla’s Emmental, Havarti, Gouda, and mozzarella are now within reach of ordinary housewives and young professionals who had been forced to be content with cheese-flavored substitutes, most of which have the texture and taste of cardboard and white paste.]


Potato cheese balls with Gouda and Emmental Two young and talented chefs showed us last week how to host a very successful party for a hundred guests without turning on the stove. All they needed were bread, herbs, a few veggies, and a variety of cheeses. Chef China Cojuangco-Gonzalez and the director and head instructor of Center for Asian Culinary Studies Gino Gonzalez teamed up at a product launch that marked a new chapter in Philippine culinary history—the entry of a major brand of natural dairy products that will meet the needs of gourmet chefs and households alike. HANDCARRIED LUXURIES Until fairly recently, foodies always came home from overseas trips lugging suitcases bulging with ingredients and specialties that were difficult to find in the Philippines: spices, sausages, hams, and cheeses. Upon reaching home, the goodies were served at intimate gatherings of close friends who feasted on the imported stuff with the enthusiasm of spies sharing state secrets. Trade liberalization is slowly changing that. Small-time smugglers and excusive delicatessens are no longer the only sources of gourmet items. They are now sold at supermarkets and food stores. READ MORE...

ALSO In America: Nutrients in Cheese


Cheese quesadilla
Cheese is produced throughout the world; it is an ancient food with origins that predate recorded history. It is a dairy product made from pressed milk curds. Different varieties are made from unripened (fresh) cheese or ripened (aged) cheese. Cheese is a delicious and nutritious food that is very versatile. You can add it to other dishes or eat it by itself. It’s convenient and portable. There are more than 300 varieties of cheese—including American, Cheddar, Mozzarella and Colby—many of which are available in various flavors, forms (chunks, slices, cubes, shredded, grated, crumbled, sticks, spreads) and packages to meet consumers' needs. Health Benefits of Cheese Cheese contains a host of nutrients like calcium, protein, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin A and vitamin B12. Calcium is one of the nutrients most likely to be lacking in the American diet. According to government statistics, nine out of 10 women and six out of 10 men fall short of calcium recommendations. The high-quality protein in cheese provides the body with essential building blocks for strong muscles. For a complete listing of the nutrients in cheese, see the table below. READ MORE...

ALSO In Canada: I love cheese. Which type is the healthiest?


Canadian cheese: The question: I love cheese. Is it good or bad for me? Is one type healthier than another? The answer: When it comes to health, cheese is a good news, bad news story. On the plus side, hard cheese is an excellent source of protein and calcium. One ounce of cheddar cheese, for example, has 7 grams of protein and 205 milligrams of calcium. Eat 1.5 ounces – considered 1 Milk and Alternatives serving – and you’re getting the same amount of calcium as one cup of milk (305 mg). Nutrition Basics: Three super-foods you should include in your diet Soft cheeses such as brie and Camembert provide less calcium with 78 mg and 165 mg of calcium per serving (1.5 ounces), respectively. Cottage cheese doesn’t compare to hard cheese either; one-half cup delivers 70 mg of calcium. Cheese also provides a fair amount of vitamins A, B2 (riboflavin) and B12, magnesium and zinc. And hard cheeses such as cheddar, Swiss and Parmesan contain very little lactose so people with a mild to moderate lactose intolerance can eat it without any symptoms. The downside: cheese is high in fat, especially saturated fat, the type that raises LDL blood cholesterol. Dairy products contain a class of saturated fat called myristic acid, which is the most potent type of saturated fat when it comes to cholesterol raising. One serving of cheese (1.5 ounces) delivers 9 grams of saturated fat, almost half a day’s worth for someone following a 2000-calorie diet. (Canadians are advised to consume no more than 10 per cent of a day’s worth of calories from saturated fat. The math: 2000 calories x 0.10 = 200 calories from saturated fat; since 1 gram of fat has 9 calories, 200/9 equals 22 grams of saturated fat.) READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

Have cheese, will party
[A sough-after brand of natural dairy products has finally landed on Philippine shores]

MANILA, OCTOBER 26, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi October 22, 2015 - Two young and talented chefs showed us last week how to host a very successful party for a hundred guests without turning on the stove. All they needed were bread, herbs, a few veggies, and a variety of cheeses.

HUSBAND AND WIFE


CHINA COJUANGCO GONZALES. INQUIRER FILE


GINO GONZALES says he belongs in the kitchen. Photo by Richard Reyes INQUIRER

Chef China Cojuangco-Gonzalez and the director and head instructor of Center for Asian Culinary Studies Gino Gonzalez teamed up at a product launch that marked a new chapter in Philippine culinary history—the entry of a major brand of natural dairy products that will meet the needs of gourmet chefs and households alike.


Pineapple upside down cake with pineapple cream cheese


Potato cheese balls with Gouda and Emmental


sun-dried tomatoes, and arugula; and Grilled bagel with smoked salmon, cream cheese, baby spinach, and capers


Wrap with Gouda ham and eggs


Chicken sandwich with melted Emmental

HANDCARRIED LUXURIES

Until fairly recently, foodies always came home from overseas trips lugging suitcases bulging with ingredients and specialties that were difficult to find in the Philippines: spices, sausages, hams, and cheeses.

Upon reaching home, the goodies were served at intimate gatherings of close friends who feasted on the imported stuff with the enthusiasm of spies sharing state secrets.

Trade liberalization is slowly changing that. Small-time smugglers and excusive delicatessens are no longer the only sources of gourmet items. They are now sold at supermarkets and food stores.

READ MORE...

GOODBYE PRETENDERS


Havarti is sometimes used in lieu of stronger cheeses such as Gouda and Emmentaler.

Last week, we celebrated this top news on the food front: natural cheeses from the world’s largest dairy company, Arla, have begun to appear on supermarket shelves.

Retailing at very competitive prices, Arla’s Emmental, Havarti, Gouda, and mozzarella are now within reach of ordinary housewives and young professionals who had been forced to be content with cheese-flavored substitutes, most of which have the texture and taste of cardboard and white paste.

EVERYDAY GOURMET

The buffet spread at the Arla launch event was classy, organic, healthy, and delicious without being ridiculously expensive. Chefs China and Gino made sure the cheese dishes were small enough to be a mouthful, filling, ungreasy, and pretty as a postcard. They can be served for breakfast, lunch, dinner, merienda, or cocktails and can easily be duplicated by anyone with little or no kitchen experience. A few pieces make for a light snack. Several servings are more than enough for a balanced meal.


IN AMERICA: Nutrients in Cheese


Cheese quesadilla

Cheese is produced throughout the world; it is an ancient food with origins that predate recorded history. It is a dairy product made from pressed milk curds.

Different varieties are made from unripened (fresh) cheese or ripened (aged) cheese.

Cheese is a delicious and nutritious food that is very versatile. You can add it to other dishes or eat it by itself. It’s convenient and portable. There are more than 300 varieties of cheese—including American, Cheddar, Mozzarella and Colby—many of which are available in various flavors, forms (chunks, slices, cubes, shredded, grated, crumbled, sticks, spreads) and packages to meet consumers' needs.

Health Benefits of Cheese

Cheese contains a host of nutrients like calcium, protein, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin A and vitamin B12. Calcium is one of the nutrients most likely to be lacking in the American diet.

According to government statistics, nine out of 10 women and six out of 10 men fall short of calcium recommendations.

The high-quality protein in cheese provides the body with essential building blocks for strong muscles. For a complete listing of the nutrients in cheese, see the table below.

READ MORE...

If you are lactose intolerant, many cheeses, particularly aged cheeses such as Cheddar and Swiss, contain little or no lactose and are often well tolerated.

For the past 30 years or so, saturated fat—found in meats, eggs, cheese, butter, whole milk, lard and some oils—was considered a primary cause of heart disease.

New research, however, is showing that saturated fat has a minimal impact on heart disease risk, which is changing the "saturated fat is bad" paradigm and allowing people to enjoy more cheese and other favorite foods. Further research is needed showing significant scientific agreement.

Even if saturated fat is less of a concern, calories still matter.

To reduce calories, you can grate or sprinkle harder cheeses over your dishes or use small amounts of aromatic and sharp cheeses for their delicious cheese flavor. Many reduced-fat varieties of cheeses are also available. This 2014 article in the Food and Nutrition Magazine provides more information on the Charms and Challenges of Cheese.

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that individuals ages 9 and older consume at least 3 servings of milk, cheese or yogurt each day; children aged 4-8 years need 2-1/2 cups per day.

One serving of cheese is one and one-half ounces of hard cheese, one-third cup for grated cheese and two ounces for processed cheese.

Source of nutrient values for cheese: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference: nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

Vitamin D fortified dairy products can be an excellent source of vitamin D, however, levels vary considerably. Read the food label or contact manufacturer for specific levels.

The sugars listed on the Nutrition Facts label include naturally occurring sugars (like those in fruit and milk) as well as those added to a food or drink.

% DV = Daily Value, based on energy and nutrient recommendations for a general 2000-calorie diet.

Units: g=grams mg=milligrams ug=micrograms IU=International Units


IN CANADA: I love cheese. Which type is the healthiest? LESLIE BECK Special to The Globe and Mail Published Monday, Jan. 27, 2014 12:00AM EST Last updated Monday, Jan. 27, 2014 12:00AM EST 20 Comments


Canadian cheese

The question: I love cheese. Is it good or bad for me? Is one type healthier than another?

The answer: When it comes to health, cheese is a good news, bad news story. On the plus side, hard cheese is an excellent source of protein and calcium. One ounce of cheddar cheese, for example, has 7 grams of protein and 205 milligrams of calcium. Eat 1.5 ounces – considered 1 Milk and Alternatives serving – and you’re getting the same amount of calcium as one cup of milk (305 mg).

Nutrition Basics: Three super-foods you should include in your diet Soft cheeses such as brie and Camembert provide less calcium with 78 mg and 165 mg of calcium per serving (1.5 ounces), respectively. Cottage cheese doesn’t compare to hard cheese either; one-half cup delivers 70 mg of calcium.

Cheese also provides a fair amount of vitamins A, B2 (riboflavin) and B12, magnesium and zinc. And hard cheeses such as cheddar, Swiss and Parmesan contain very little lactose so people with a mild to moderate lactose intolerance can eat it without any symptoms.

The downside: cheese is high in fat, especially saturated fat, the type that raises LDL blood cholesterol. Dairy products contain a class of saturated fat called myristic acid, which is the most potent type of saturated fat when it comes to cholesterol raising. One serving of cheese (1.5 ounces) delivers 9 grams of saturated fat, almost half a day’s worth for someone following a 2000-calorie diet.

(Canadians are advised to consume no more than 10 per cent of a day’s worth of calories from saturated fat. The math: 2000 calories x 0.10 = 200 calories from saturated fat; since 1 gram of fat has 9 calories, 200/9 equals 22 grams of saturated fat.)

READ MORE...

There is controversy about how bad saturated fat is for heart health.

Recent studies suggest that eating diets high in saturated fat don’t raise the risk of heart disease or stroke. But that doesn’t mean you can eat as much cheese – or bacon – as you like.

Reducing your intake of saturated fat is good for you health if you replace it with heart-healthy unsaturated fat found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, avocado and oily fish. Swapping refined carbohydrates (e.g. white bread, white rice, sweets, sugary drinks) for saturated fat, however, won’t benefit your health. Doing so can lower HDL (good) cholesterol and blood triglycerides, thereby increasing the risk of heart disease.

Back to cheese. If you eat it often – and you’re trying to reduce your saturated fat intake – choose partly skimmed milk (15 to 20 per cent milk fat) or skim milk (less than 10 per cent milk fat) cheese more often. Other tips to cut back on full fat cheese include:

Order pizza with half the regular amount of full fat mozzarella cheese.

Or, skip the mozzarella and top your pizza with goat or feta cheese instead (it’s lower in fat and bigger in flavour).


THE QUARTER POUNDER

At restaurants, order sandwiches and burgers without cheese. Adding cheese (processed) to a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder, for example, boosts its saturated fat content by 5 grams – a quarter of a day’s worth. (It also adds 100 calories and 480 mg of sodium.)

Use reduced-fat cheeses in baking and cooking. For instance, make lasagna with part skim milk cheese and ricotta with 5 per cent milk fat.

When adding full fat cheese to sandwiches and wraps, use grated cheese instead of slices to decrease the portion while still adding flavour.

Follow us on Twitter: @Globe_Health


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD -Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin. Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
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Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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