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SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
FEATURING HER 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' (Manila Bulletin)
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

TESORO's LEGACY
[IN HONOR OF SALUD TESORO, A BOOK OF HER INCREDIBLE LIFE]


AUGUST 24 -SALUD TESORO: ‘Mother of Philippine handicrafts’ -Philippine handicrafts have come a long way from the days of 'sigay' shell necklaces and 'ipil-ipil' seed placemats of the 1950s.
Though the years, Fiipiniana selections improved by leaps and bounds to become good enough to wear to state dinners, even to weddings. One woman is almost singlehandedly responsible for this success: Salud Tesoro. TESORO’S LEGACY  I should know; in 1977, my fiancé Vic flew in a few hours before our scheduled march down the aisle of the Las Piñas Bamboo Organ Church and needed a wedding barong tagalog fast. Off-the-rack was out of the question; he was six feet, four inches tall and Manila stores never stock shirts his size. One store solved our problem; Tesoros on Mabini in Ermita. READ MORE...

ALSO: Hail, king coco
[From roots to husk, every part of the coconut tree is made into a product]

 
AUGUST 27 -It is National Coconut Week and we pay homage to one of the pillars of the Philippine economy and of our country’s cuisine.
Every Filipino child learns in school that the coconut is to be revered like the Tree of Life for providing almost everything man needs to survive: food, shelter, medicine, and other vital necessities. Each part of the tree is useful, from the roots to the flowers. When the tree gets too old to be productive, the trunk becomes sawn lumber called Madera Imelda, a substitute for endangered forest trees. When coconut flowers are tapped, the sap produces many highly-prized food products. It could be boiled down to become palm sugar, a very healthy alternative to cane sugar. The sap is also brewed to become alcoholic drinks: tuba if drank straight, lambanog after distillation. Tuba that’s allowed to ferment longer becomes coconut vinegar. The nuts yield even more useful products. The meat, at various stages of maturity, could be added to thousands of dishes: soups, salads, ice cream, main courses, candy, and other confections. Oil from the mature nuts’ meat can be made into shortening, margarine, cooking oil, and the toast of herbal medicine: virgin coconut oil. Waste byproducts now have great commercial value. Coconut water from young nuts has become the most fashionable health drink, even endorsed by Madonna. Water from mature nuts is the medium for manufacturing nata de coco, which remains very popular in Japan. The husk, which used to be thrown away, is now woven into biodegradable nets that prevent soil erosion. Husk fibers are also made into brooms, a new product that can provide livelihood to thousands in the countryside. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

Tesoro’s legacy: In honor of Salud Tesoro, a book of her incredible life

MANILA, AUGUST 31, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi August 24, 2015 - Philippine handicrafts have come a long way from the days of sigay shell necklaces and ipil-ipil seed placemats of the 1950s.

Though the years, Fiipiniana selections improved by leaps and bounds to become good enough to wear to state dinners, even to weddings. One woman is almost singlehandedly responsible for this success: Salud Tesoro.

TESORO’S LEGACY

I should know; in 1977, my fiancé Vic flew in a few hours before our scheduled march down the aisle of the Las Piñas Bamboo Organ Church and needed a wedding barong tagalog fast.


The Tesoro 'Barong' [Sol isn't that short, at least 5' or 5'2". Vic's just a very tall American 6'5" .Webmaster note]

Off-the-rack was out of the question; he was six feet, four inches tall and Manila stores never stock shirts his size.

One store solved our problem; Tesoros on Mabini in Ermita.

There, a charming lady, perfectly coiffed and bejeweled, showed us embroidered materials to choose from, even accommodating Vic’s request that the barong have two pockets for his pen and cigarettes.

READ MORE...


Woman of many hats: Salud Tesoro, here in her first Tesoro’s shop on Escolta, has been hailed as a souvenir trade pioneer, a patron of local crafts, a service-driven shop owner, and a steadfast and resilient businesswoman. From (The Philippine Star) | Updated February 9, 2015 - 12:00am

The barong was ready and fit him perfectly when we picked it up two hours later on our way to church. There was no extra charge for the personalized service. We were so impressed and bought several more over the next few years, always seeking the advice of the “maasikaso” nice lady in charge.

She made us feel very special. Only much later did we find out she was the big boss, Salud Tesoro, who treated everyone—customers and staff—like members of her own family.

Mrs. Tesoro was always there with helpful suggestions on material and style, charming even the most hardened foreign correspondents, such as Geraldo Rivera, who needed formal barongs for official Malacañang interviews and coverages.

TOUGH SURVIVOR

The life and times of Salud Tesoro, the stuff of legends, could not but inspire.

Surviving the loss of parents, she used her intuitive acumen to prosper as a pioneer entrepreneur in the field of Philippine handicraft, which she single handedly elevated to its present status.

A genuine feminist although she never took refuge behind the word, she tackled the roles of businesswoman, mother, and wife effortlessly and laid the solid foundation that now ensures the continuation of the enterprises she and her husband had very successfully established.

Salud S. Tesoro, The Story of a Successful Entrepreneurial Filipina, a charming book about her life, was launched a few days ago at the Manila Polo Club. Hundreds of friends, several generations of her large family, business associates and loyal Tesoro clients gathered to honor this remarkable woman who was very definitely ahead of her time.

The book is full of photographs chronicling her trials and travails, and toasts her successes. She defied conventional norms that would have relegated her to a life of domesticity, blazing her own trails in business and in life.

 

She survived the various crises of the Philippine economy, adapting deftly to fast-changing lifestyles to continuously serve the needs of Filipinos around the world, taking Philippine handicrafts to new heights and equating the Tesoro brand with Filipino craftsmanship and elegance.

It is a book worth sharing, reading and keeping.


Tesoro’s Philippine Handicrafts kicks off year-long celebration  -With Celebration of the Birth Centennial of Salud S. Tesoro From TESORO's TREASURES SINCE 1945

Here’s how her children feel about the book.

“This book is a testament of our mother’s dedication and the successful business she worked hard to build. It serves as an inspiration to each and every one in Tesoros as we face our everyday triumphs and challenges and a highly competitive future. As long as we live by our core values, innovate and adapt to the changing times, Tesoros will always be the company that endures—a true Filipino treasure.”

From the children of Tesoros, co founders Atty. Nestor B. Tesoro and Salud S. Tesoro


(L-R) John Benjamin Tesoro; Dettie Tesoro- Carunungan; Dolly Tesoro- Arit; Bobby Tesoro; Beng Tesoro; Mita Tesoro- Gutierrez; Atty. Tito Tesoro; Atty. Lulu Tesoro-Castañeda; Alice Tesoro-Guerrero  COURTESY OF THE STANDARD AUGUST 24, 2015


Hail, king coco
[From roots to husk, every part of the coconut tree is made into a product] by Sol Vanzi August 27, 2015 Share0 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share1 image: http://www.mb.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/zcx.jpg



It is National Coconut Week and we pay homage to one of the pillars of the Philippine economy and of our country’s cuisine.

THE TREE

Every Filipino child learns in school that the coconut is to be revered like the Tree of Life for providing almost everything man needs to survive: food, shelter, medicine, and other vital necessities. Each part of the tree is useful, from the roots to the flowers.

When the tree gets too old to be productive, the trunk becomes sawn lumber called Madera Imelda, a substitute for endangered forest trees.

THE FLOWER

When coconut flowers are tapped, the sap produces many highly-prized food products. It could be boiled down to become palm sugar, a very healthy alternative to cane sugar.

TUBA

The sap is also brewed to become alcoholic drinks: tuba if drank straight, lambanog after distillation. Tuba that’s allowed to ferment longer becomes coconut vinegar.


SOURCE: PHILIPPINE INFORMATION AGENCY

THE NUTS

The nuts yield even more useful products. The meat, at various stages of maturity, could be added to thousands of dishes: soups, salads, ice cream, main courses, candy, and other confections.

THE OIL

Oil from the mature nuts’ meat can be made into shortening, margarine, cooking oil, and the toast of herbal medicine: virgin coconut oil.

COCONUT WATER

Waste byproducts now have great commercial value. Coconut water from young nuts has become the most fashionable health drink, even endorsed by Madonna. Water from mature nuts is the medium for manufacturing nata de coco, which remains very popular in Japan.

THE HUSK

The husk, which used to be thrown away, is now woven into biodegradable nets that prevent soil erosion. Husk fibers are also made into brooms, a new product that can provide livelihood to thousands in the countryside.

READ MORE...

This being a food column, let us discuss the coconut’s role in Philippine and Asian cuisine.

The two most popular savory dishes using coconut meat are binakol and chicken curry.

Binakol is simple. It is identical to tinola but uses young coconut meat in place of papaya. For drama, the binakol is often served in a young coconut.


Chicken Binakol --PHOTO COURTESY OF LOCAL KUSINERO

Chicken curry is nothing more than ginataang manok with curry powder. For a richer and more Southeast Asian touch, add kerisik, a favorite Malaysian ingredient which is simply freshly grated coconut, stir-toasted in an unoiled pan. For a thicker gravy, the kerisik is powdered in a blender or mortar and pestle. Kerisik is also one of the basic ingredients of beef rendang.

Almost all Filipino native desserts use coconut milk extracted from mature nuts.

Champorado is sweet glutinous rice soup with chocolate and coconut milk.

Ginatan is sweetened rice soup with coconut milk and either fresh corn or toasted monggo.

Alpahol is made by boiling sliced bananas, yams (gabe, ube, kamote), jackfruit and sago in sugared coconut milk. 

Coconut milk is also indispensable in rice cakes, cassava cake and suman, while freshly grated coconut is a must when serving putong puti, and puto kutsinta.

Bukayo, a childhood favorite, is easy to make. Young coconut strips are stirred over low flame in brown sugar syrup until the mixture is almost dry. Then, the mixture is dropped by the spoonful on wax paper to harden.


BUKAYO: GOOGLE IMAGE unBLOGGED


SOL JOSE VANZI's PHNO PAGE


Photo from Kyle Victor Jose's iPAD -Lifestyle/Food and Arts & Culture columnist of the Manila Daily Bulletin. Signature title "Timpla't Tikim"
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Sol in 1997 Photo: PHNO Editor/Travel & Leisure page
http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


Photo of Sol and young Kyle Victor Jose in March 2005 at PHNO/QCNet office in Levitown, Paranaque. Photoshot by Leo Q. Carolino.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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