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SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
SOL VANZI's 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' & LIFESTYLE
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

FROM THE FAMILY KITCHEN
[
Celebrity cook Sherson Lian shares Chinese, Malay, and Indian recipes in new AFC show]


AUGUST 6 ---The mother-son team Ann and Sherson-- Celebrity cook Sherson Lian proudly shares the limelight with the number one woman of his life in the new Asian Food Channel (AFC) series Family Kitchen with Sherson, which debuts today. “It is the first program I’ve filmed with the love of my life, my mother, and it is an incredible experience. She is the person who encouraged me to pursue a career in food, and her passion continues to inspire me every day,” the host told Manila Bulletin Lifestyle in a phone interview from his home base in Kuala Lumpur. READ MORE...

ALSO: A witness to history Manila Hotel’s iconic grand ballroom is reimagined


The Manila Hotel’s new Fiesta Pavilion For more than 103 years, the Fiesta Pavilion has continually been the setting of historical events that shaped the nation, a claim that cannot be matched by any other hotel function room. To this history, the Manila Hotel has been a silent but active and affectionate witness. If the hotel’s walls could speak and narrate the story of this institution, they would indirectly be narrating Philippine history, for the Manila Hotel’s story almost runs parallel to, and remarkably reflects, the broad sweep of Philippine history from the early 20th century on. The Manila Hotel’s inauguration in 1912 introduced to the world an institution that was to become a Jewel in the Orient, a destination that was to be home for the rich and famous. The hotel claimed many firsts: the first Asian hotel to have electric elevators and the first restaurant-ballroom with air conditioning. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

From the family kitchen
[Celebrity cook Sherson Lian shares Chinese, Malay, and Indian recipes in new AFC show]

MANILA, AUGUST 10, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi - Celebrity cook Sherson Lian proudly shares the limelight with the number one woman of his life in the new Asian Food Channel (AFC) series Family Kitchen with Sherson, which debuts today.

“It is the first program I’ve filmed with the love of my life, my mother, and it is an incredible experience. She is the person who encouraged me to pursue a career in food, and her passion continues to inspire me every day,” the host told Manila Bulletin Lifestyle in a phone interview from his home base in Kuala Lumpur.

READ MORE...


The mother-son team Ann and Sherson


Sherson and Ann Lian combine Indian, Malay, and Chinese influences to produce unique dishes

SHARE, INSPIRE

The whole idea of the show is not merely to have Sherson or his mom Ann Lian teach viewers how to cook, but about sharing his upbringing, especially the dishes that he grew up watching his mother cook.

“I want to share our precious family moments together with AFC viewers and I hope they will be able to create some of their own food memories while watching the program,” he explains.


Buah keluk

The show captures light moments with the entire Lian brood chiding Sherson about the food, just like in private bonding moments away from cameras.

“Our family loves to eat. We may disagree on a lot of things but when it comes to food, all the differences are set aside and we just have a good time.”

CULTURES, MEMORIES

Featured throughout the season are dishes that represent various cultures in Malaysia: Chinese, Indian, and Malay. “Chinese which mom cooked while we were growing up and Indian because when my dad was growing up, he spent lots of time in the Indian temple that gave out free food, encouraging our desire for Indian food at an early age,” Sherson explains.

Malay food is very rich, and reminds Sherson of a recent trip to the Philippines’ Bicol region where he enjoyed the native specialty, Bicol Express.

SHARED INGREDIENTS

A vital Malay ingredient, kerisik, is almost identical to the Filipino budbud or burbor. It consists of mature, grated coconut, stir-fried without oil until golden brown.

In the Philippines, burbor is sprinkled on native desserts like kalamay (sticky rice cake) or maja blanca (corn meal cake). Malays use kerisik to flavor and thicken savory stews such as the popular beef (or chicken) rendang.

In Southern Mindanao, the Tausugs literally burn the coconut meat until it turns black and then pound the meat to a fine powder with a mortar and pestle. The powder is the central ingredient in the classic tyula itum (black soup) served at very important events.


Pan-seared cod with spicy bean paste 

SHERSON’S STEAK

Instead of plain salt and pepper, he pre-seasons raw steaks with premium soy sauce and Chinese black vinegar.

Soy sauce on beef is very traditional Chinese, giving the meat a nice caramelization. A touch of vinegar helps keep the balance of beef fat and flavor.

FAMILY RECIPE

Here’s an easy version of the Lian family classic, Paradise Fried Rice.
Make fried rice paste by blending 250 grams of onions, eight grams of garlic,
10 pieces of red chili, two tablespoons of salted black beans, one teaspoon of sugar, and two tablespoons of tomato paste.

Slowly cook in one cup of vegetable oil until flavors blend and the sauce thickens, separating from the oil.

For each cup of steamed rice, mix in one tablespoon of fried rice paste.

Microwave for three minutes or stir fry in a wok.

Serve topped with stir-fried chicken, prawns, spring onions, and one fried egg.


Family Kitchen with Sherson (TEASER) - Coming Soon in August 2015 on Asian Food PHOTO FROM VIDEOSONAR.COM


ALSO: A witness to history Manila Hotel’s iconic grand ballroom is reimagined by Sol Vanzi August 2, 2015 Share11 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share23


The Manila Hotel’s new Fiesta Pavilion

For more than 103 years, the Fiesta Pavilion has continually been the setting of historical events that shaped the nation, a claim that cannot be matched by any other hotel function room. To this history, the Manila Hotel has been a silent but active and affectionate witness.

If the hotel’s walls could speak and narrate the story of this institution, they would indirectly be narrating Philippine history, for the Manila Hotel’s story almost runs parallel to, and remarkably reflects, the broad sweep of Philippine history from the early 20th century on.

The Manila Hotel’s inauguration in 1912 introduced to the world an institution that was to become a Jewel in the Orient, a destination that was to be home for the rich and famous. The hotel claimed many firsts: the first Asian hotel to have electric elevators and the first restaurant-ballroom with air conditioning.

READ MORE...

Some of the photographs published on The Philippine Herald on Aug. 18, 1937.

The shots were taken at a party hosted by the Osmeñas for the Quezons at the Manila Hotel. (Flickr/Presidential Museum and Library PH)


A glimpse of the Fiesta Pavilion


The annual ball and reception given by the President of the Philippines for the National Assembly was a fixture in the official calendar during Commonwealth days. The 1939 ball at the Manila Hotel shows the Rigodon de Honor, and vividly portrays the formality and elegance of official entertainment at the time. Formality and protocol were viewed as essential attributes of a nascent state. At the far end of the line is President Manuel Quezon with Mrs. Jose Yulo, wife of the Speaker. (Flickr/Presidential Museum and Library PH)


Some of the photographs published on The Philippine Herald on Aug. 18, 1937. The shots were taken at a party hosted by the Osmeñas for the Quezons at the Manila Hotel. (Flickr/Presidential Museum and Library PH)


The Ceremonial Toast From left: Manila Hotel president Joey Lina, resident manager Gerhard Doll, director Benjamin C. Yap, director and corporate secretary Francis Gaw, vice chairman Hermogenes P. Pobre, chairman of the board Basilio C. Yap, vice chairman Dr. Emilio C. Yap III, director and executive vice president Dr. Enrique Y. Yap, Jr., and Michael Y. Yap


The Manila Hotel’s board of directors: (from left) director and executive vice president Dr. Enrique Y. Yap, Jr., chairman of the board Basilio C. Yap, and vice chairman Dr. Emilio C. Yap III


Gerhard Doll, the resident manager of The Manila Hotel, welcomes the guests to ‘An Icon Reimagined’

That reputation for excellence continues to this day.

COLONIAL ERA

The Manila Hotel was established in the early days of American colonial rule. Characteristically, it was built as an establishment catering exclusively to Americans and from which—in typical colonial fashion—natives were barred as patrons, although not as employees. And just to emphasize the point that this was to be an American institution, it was inaugurated with lavish balls and fireworks on July 4, 1912, to coincide with the Independence Day celebrations of the American community here.

But just as the Filipinos’ fight for his own independence never stopped, the Filipinos fight for the recognition of his own dignity and sovereignty in his own homeland was likewise reflected in the policies of the Manila Hotel. The initial barriers of social discrimination that existed between whites and browns, which effectively barred native Filipinos from access to the enclaves of the whites, eventually broke down in this hotel.

FIESTA PAVILION

Political and social changes really came during the time of the Philippine Commonwealth, when the Manila Hotel’s Fiesta Pavilion was the ballroom of choice for huge official functions hosted by the head of state, President Manuel Quezon.

Lavish balls such as Kahirup and Mancomunidad, attended by the richest Filipino families, followed suit. By the mid-1960s, these lavish events caught the ire of student activists who rallied against what they described as callous displays of wealth.

By that time, the Fiesta Pavilion had become synonymous with political party conventions that shaped the country’s future.

HERITAGE CONSERVATION

In 1974, the government resisted pressures from designers who considered the original Manila Hotel building to be old, obsolete, and deserved to be completely demolished. The national leadership recoiled at suggestions that a brand-new hotel be constructed on top of the ashes and debris of the old.

The government defended the people’s right to demand that their historical landmarks not only be preserved but be restored to them in their former splendor and glory.

“It would have been a pity if an institution that not even a savage World War could raze to the ground would finally cave in to the methodical and efficient destruction of a demolition crew; that would have been an unforgivable desecration of history,” said President Ferdinand Marcos on the 70th anniversary of the Manila Hotel in 1982.

NEW FIESTA PAVILION

Last weekend, the hotel unveiled its latest improvements; the newly refurbished Fiesta Pavilion, restored to its glory and equipped with the latest technological touches.

After more than a year of work, artisans intricately transformed the Manila Hotel’s grand ballroom, the Fiesta Pavilion, into a luxurious realm, adding more flexibility and more functionality in response to the increasing demand for smarter spaces. This is in preparation for the capital city’s hosting of global events.

Versatility rules the new Fiesta Pavilion; it can host events as varied in size as in atmosphere, whether it’s an intimate wedding for a hundred or cocktails attended by 1,800 guests. The ambience adjusts to clients’ requirements; from the quiet elegance of flowers, candles, crystal and lace, the venue could transform into a futuristic world of pulsating laser lights.

There is no doubt the Fiesta Pavilion will continue its century-old role as an elegant witness to history.



Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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