SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE

SOL VANZI's 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM' & LIFESTYLE
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

THE MAGIC OF MAYO
Believe it or not, but this thick, creamy sauce is not only born in a jar


In the 1960s, there were only two kinds of mayonnaise available: homemade and imported. I used to watch my aunt Helen Jose, youngest sister of my dad, beat eggs and oil together with seasonings until the liquid emulsified enough to form soft peaks. It was an exacting task. All the utensils had to be spotlessly clean and bone dry. It was also hard on the hands and arms without an electric mixer, using only a manual eggbeater. A student of nutrition at St. Paul’s, Aunt Helen knew what she was doing and never experienced coagulation, a catastrophe commonly encountered by novices attempting to combine eggs and oil to produce one of the most popular sauces known to man. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

The magic of mayo
Believe it or not, but this thick, creamy sauce is not only born in a jar


The imported Mayo

MANILA, JULY 23, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi July 23, 2015 - In the 1960s, there were only two kinds of mayonnaise available: homemade and imported.

I used to watch my aunt Helen Jose, youngest sister of my dad, beat eggs and oil together with seasonings until the liquid emulsified enough to form soft peaks. It was an exacting task.

All the utensils had to be spotlessly clean and bone dry. It was also hard on the hands and arms without an electric mixer, using only a manual eggbeater.

A student of nutrition at St. Paul’s, Aunt Helen knew what she was doing and never experienced coagulation, a catastrophe commonly encountered by novices attempting to combine eggs and oil to produce one of the most popular sauces known to man.

READ MORE...

Families who had no kitchen expert had to be content with bottled American mayo bought from suppliers of PX goods with PX meaning “post exchange” or commissary of the US Military, whose bases in the Philippines were major black market sources of imported goods.


Mini cua pao with pork belly asado


Crispy fish fillet sliders

Crispy fish fillet sliders PX goods were sold all over Cavite City, Angeles, Olongapo, and Baguio, communities that were hosts to US military facilities: Sangley Point Naval Base, Clark Air Base, Subic Naval Base, and Camp John Hay.


Grilled tuna bites


Deep-fried crispy tostadas


Three-cheese risotto balls dips


Real Chef judges (from left) Chef Boy Logro, Chef Bugia, Chef Joanne Gendrano, and UFS managing director Colin Butler

ALL THAT FOR MAYO

Yes, people went through a lot for good mayo.

For 36 years, I made one liter of mayo weekly for my husband and children, a household routine we carried on long after the US bases closed and American-style mayo became available at supermarkets all over Manila.

These days, those who love food still make mayonnaise in small quantities for personal use. High-end eateries and commercial establishments will not be admitting publicly that they use bottled stuff.

FILIPINO TASTE

One product that’s making huge inroads in the bottled sauce market is something called “Real Mayonnaise” by Lady’s Choice. A bit sweet for Westerners, it is judged by Pinoys as “just right” for sandwiches, salads, and other surprising uses.

I have used it in Mexican guacamole, Arabic shawarma garlic sauce, Italian pesto, Bangkok pad Thai, Malay mango salad, Canadian salmon scramble, and zucchini mock crabcake.

At a recent media event, professional chefs presented cupcakes, dips, risotto balls, and sushi made with the local product. Foodies and journalists tried their hand at concocting sauces using materials and ingredients on hand.

All the dishes, including those made by amateurs, were more than passable. They were good.

MAYO MANGO PIE


Mayo mango empanada

The lovable chef Boy Logro, adored by millions of TV watchers, charmed the socks off the audience with his no-nonsense chatter and simple recipes. He demonstrated how easy it is to make empanaditas that are perfect for snacks and baon for school children, yet sophisticated enough for sosyal parties.

HOW TO MAKE AN EMPANADA

1. Combine ¼ cup of sugar and one teaspoon of cinnamon. Sprinkle over four cups of diced ripe mangoes.

2. Sift together three cups of flour and one teaspoon of salt. Work in 10 tablespoons of butter and six tablespoons of shortening. Work until it resembles cornmeal. Add one egg and ½ cup of water. Mix until smooth. Cover with a wet towel to rest.

3. Make one-inch balls and flatten each into three-inch rounds. Spoon one tablespoon of mango filling on each round, fold in half, and pinch to seal. Brush with egg yolk.

4. Deep fry until golden brown.



Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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