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THE TASTE OF DECADES PAST
Dine on food and memories at this old bungalow-turned-resto at Scout Limbaga


SCOUT LIMBAGA 77--- Off Tomas Morato Street, on Scout Limbaga, a 1950s bungalow stands as though frozen in time. Only a simple sign hints that it is no longer a home but a restaurant that is fast becoming a favorite for lunch, dinner, and cocktails.
Inside, much remains untouched by the conversion from home to eatery. The windows, walls, room dividers, and ceilings echo the period of its original construction. A winding staircase leading to the former private family quarters never fails to attract attention and is a favorite background for selfies. Guests are awed by the steps that seem suspended in air with no visible support. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: Cool Dads, Inc. The joys and challenges of fatherhood


“I will always listen to you.” 
This beautiful line, given by visual artist Jinggoy Buensuceso to his three-year-old son, Malaya, who suddenly babbled an incoherent speech about a toy during an interview, pretty much summed-up the dynamics of being a young dad: Committed, loving, and with a heart full of promise. Dads, although always the strong one, start their journey with a little vulnerability. Not knowing where the path to fatherhood would lead them, most stumble their way toward what’s good and valuable for their family, and end up forging their own game plan in life, while making unforgettable memories along the way. READ MORE...

ALSO: Father's Day


Father's Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. Many countries celebrate it on the third Sunday of June, though it is also celebrated widely on other days by many other countries.
Father's Day was inaugurated in the United States in the early 20th century to complement Mother's Day in celebrating fatherhood and male. After Mother's day, people started celebrating Father's Day because there should be a day for fathers too! parenting. First observance  Grace Golden Clayton may have been inspired by Anna Jarvis' crusade to establish Mother's Day; two months prior, Jarvis had held a celebration for her dead mother in Grafton, West Virginia, a town about 15 miles (24 km) away from Fairmont. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

The taste of decades past
Dine on food and memories at this old bungalow-turned-resto at 'Scout Limbaga'


Scout-Limbaga 77

MANILA, JUNE 22, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi June 18 - Off Tomas Morato Street, on Scout Limbaga, a 1950s bungalow stands as though frozen in time.

Only a simple sign hints that it is no longer a home but a restaurant that is fast becoming a favorite for lunch, dinner, and cocktails.

Inside, much remains untouched by the conversion from home to eatery.

The windows, walls, room dividers, and ceilings echo the period of its original construction.

A winding staircase leading to the former private family quarters never fails to attract attention and is a favorite background for selfies.

Guests are awed by the steps that seem suspended in air with no visible support.

CONTINUE READING...

(Images by Noel B. Pabalate)
ALL VEGGIES Updated:


dahon ng 'sili pesto' (CHILI LEAVES)


Pako Salad (pak´o' noun. fern)


Gumiling na 'tokwa' (TOFU OR SOYBEAN CAKE)


Binusog na 'pusit' (SQUID)


Partners Sonny Boy Fortuna, Bryce Japson, and Rex Tiri ascend the classic staircase.

One can’t help but imagine life in the neighborhood in decades past, from the time Commonwealth President Manuel Quezon appointed Tomas Morato as the first mayor of what was planned to be the country’s premier city.

Morato, Quezon, and a young Alejandro Roces planted hundreds of tamarind saplings along what was to be named Sampaloc street.

Three years into Morato’s term, in 1942, he was arrested by Japanese occupiers.

Grateful residents named the tamarind-lined avenue after him, much later, and the area soon became famous for restaurants of all types and persuasions.

Today, Tomas Morato is so popular that new establishments have spilled into the streets crossing the original restaurant row.

One of these newbies is Limbaga 77, an innovative restaurant that’s easy to find because its name is also its address.

LADIES WHO LUNCH

The day we came, well-dressed and coiffed women composed half of the noontime crowd. The rest were executives who were obviously on official business lunch meetings. As they were regular customers with favorite items on the menu, we ordered what they were having.

Their choices were perfect: vegetables, seafood, beancurd, vegetarian pasta, Pinoy regional signature dishes, and irresistible desserts.

EXOTIC STARTERS

Our first starter was too pretty to eat: delicate squash blossoms filled with ground pork, kesong puti, spring onions, and garlic. Sealed in a bound breading, the flowers kept their shape and sealed in the flavors while being deep-fried. The result? Crusty crisp exterior with meltingly rich stuffing.

Eggplant was the main ingredient of poqui-poqui rolls, an interpretation of the Ilocos salad but wrapped in lumpia wrapper and fried.

Gumiling na tokwa was a huge block of tofu, deep-fried to a crisp and served with pork stir-fried in Hoisin and oyster sauce.

Pako salad was a pleasant surprise, especially since fern shoots are difficult to find in the middle of summer’s heat wave.

Cucumber slices, cherry tomatoes, and match stick-thin French beans were added with red onions and an herb dressing thickened with salted duck eggs.

SEAFOOD GALORE

Too pretty to eat were the spicy seafood adobo and binusog na pusit.

The first was a large plate (bandehado) filled with prawns, mussels, and squid rings in a sauce of spicy adobo sa gata.

The grilled squid was so fresh it looked ready to slither out of the plate. Stuffed with onions, tomatoes, cheese, and pesto, the squid was served atop a thin layer of seasoned soy sauce.

We promised ourselves to try their meat dishes when we return.


MANILA BULLETIN LIFESTYLE

Cool Dads, Inc. The joys and challenges of fatherhood by Mae Lorrraine Rafols - Lorenzo June 14, 2015 Share635 Tweet4 Share1 Email0 Share642 image: http://www.mb.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/COOL-DADS.jpg


COOL DADS (Photos by Stanley Ong)

“I will always listen to you.”

This beautiful line, given by visual artist Jinggoy Buensuceso to his three-year-old son, Malaya, who suddenly babbled an incoherent speech about a toy during an interview, pretty much summed-up the dynamics of being a young dad: Committed, loving, and with a heart full of promise.

Dads, although always the strong one, start their journey with a little vulnerability. Not knowing where the path to fatherhood would lead them, most stumble their way toward what’s good and valuable for their family, and end up forging their own game plan in life, while making unforgettable memories along the way.

READ MORE...

This is the journey being shared by three young dads for this special pre-Father’s Day issue—whose unique personas make for extraordinary stories, but whose familiar love is emblematic of every young parent’s hopes and dreams for their family…


Carlo-Antonio.jpg

Carlo Antonio

Seeing three-year-old Asher Antonio in his preppy chinos, white button-down shirt, velvet bowtie, and loafers, you can’t help but wonder what kind of parents the little ball of energy has to have such a cool sense of style. But meeting his parents, dad Carlo with his quiet confidence, and mom Cat and her glamorous spirit, it’s easy to see where Asher got his flair.

It is Asher’s father, Carlo, however, who stressed the importance of nurturing his son’s individuality, a feat considering both parents are highly-influential with Carlo taking on the responsibility as chief finance officer of mega developer, Century Properties.

“I just want him to be happy. His life doesn’t have to be patterned after mine or his mom’s,” says Carlo, who also shares that fatherhood has indeed changed his perspective, adding more color to his fast-paced corporate lifestyle. “The best part is seeing him smile, seeing his expressions—the surprise, laughter—all those emotions. Fatherhood has taught me to slow down and appreciate them all.”

This means that despite his busy schedule in helping run the family business, he makes sure to be fully-involved in his son’s day-to-day activities, even if it’s something as simple as watching his favorite cartoons with him, or playing with Asher’s favorite toys (planes, helicopters, and other hovering devices).

This also means constantly introducing activities that his son might get interested in in the future, such as sports. “I’m trying to get him to play golf, which I really like, and I see that he’s interested in playing it,” beams Carlo. “Or we go play soccer. I’m not exactly a sporty person, but I’d like to instill the importance of an active lifestyle.”

And now that Asher is almost ready for school, Carlo is extending extra effort to enjoy being with his son as much as he can. “It’s all about balance actually,” he says. “I would love to spend more time with him even with all my work. And If I can give him a piece of advice now which I hope he remembers when he grows up, it’s with hope that he strives to have balance in everything that he does. That’s very important.”

Even if they are quite different—Asher is very outgoing and talkative, while Carlo is quiet and serious—I’m quite happy with how they are together. I can really count on Carlo when it comes to our son, to our family.—Cat Arambulo-Antonio


Patrick-Garcia.jpg

Patrick Garcia

Showbiz personality Patrick Garcia just got an early Father’s Day gift: A new baby!

Still fresh from the experience of being a new dad to two-year-old Chelsea, Patrick is gearing up for round two with wife Nikka, and he can’t be happier.

“Fatherhood was more than what I expected it to be. It was even better!” he says.

To the actor, famous for his roles on TV and in films, it’s an exhilarating experience to “have the opportunity to take care of somebody else’s life. You learn to appreciate how fragile and precious life is, and it’s a good feeling and very rewarding when you see them grow up beautifully. That’s definitely the best part of being a parent.”

Which is why Patrick can’t wait to take on the challenge once again: “There’s no crash course in being a good parent, so it’s like a sense of accomplishment when you see that you’re doing something right with your child.”

Fatherhood has given Patrick the opportunity to establish stronger ties with people closest to him, such as his sister Chesca Kramer, and his dad. “I turn to them to help me and my wife raise our family. We’ve gotten closer because of it,” he says.

He is very thankful for a profession that allows him to spend more time with his family. “I get to spend a lot of time with them, and my job allows me to be hands on with Chelsea,” he says. “We have a yaya, but she’s just on standby just in case we need help with the everyday stuff. But mostly, it’s just me and my wife who are involved with our daughter’s life.”

But will he allow Chelsea to forge the same path toward showbiz (the two-year-old toddler is very much a looker like his dad and mom)?

Patrick hopes that she finishes her studies first, but will fully support her in what she wants to do. “We’ll be here for her no matter what,” he says. “We want her to always remember that.”

Patrick is a super, super dad, and he exceeded my expectations. He’s very hands on, very loving. He doesn’t shy away from the responsibilities of being a father to Chelsea. He can give her a bath, or change a dirty diaper, and he wouldn’t complain at all. He’s a great partner.—Nikka Martinez-Garcia


Jinggoy-Buensuceso.jpg

Jinggoy Buensuceso

The Buensucesos are a family of free spirits. They live in a lush land in Alfonso,Cavite, with 15 dogs, cats, a coop full of chickens, a backyard full of ducks, two bunnies, a handful of lizards, and plants and trees home to insects.

And they live in a black house—a space which dad Jinggoy, a well-known visual artist, dubs as their own “canvas.”

“My children don’t question why they live in a black house,” says Jinggoy. “They love it, and they really love that their home is located where there are many plants, trees, insects, and animals.”

Obviously, his artistic flair is a big influence on the family’s free-spirited way of life. Jinggoy wants his children to know that this kind of life is possible, and that it’s a choice they can consider when they grow up. “We want them to learn how to explore, how to see life as extraordinary,” he says. “I want them to be able to express themselves, and with hope, when they grow up, our home would make them remember and always make them long to go back and visit us.”

Wife Mutya explains, “Jinggoy as a dad taught us to look at the ordinary things in a special way. For example, he taught the kids to look at a kiwi as not just a fruit, but as a furry being with an interesting and colorful face that can give us nutrition. Living in our home makes that thinking very easy. Anything is possible.”

The feeling, however, is mutual, according to the 33-year-old dad. “When my kids were born, they changed my life completely. Sobra. They influence the way I think, the way I live my life, and even my work. As an artist, my chosen medium is metal, and it can be very dangerous. When I had my own family, I learned to be more careful, and value my life more.”

This has made Jinggoy more focused on his family even as he dabbled deeper and deeper in his art. “I decided to have my workshop near our home, so that means that they can also go in where I work,” he says. “But it’s a rule that they can only go there when I’m around, to be sure that they are safe. Even my workers know that the children come first.”

Does he see them following his path? “I think they are both artists. Mayumi, who’s five, knows very well how to express herself. Malaya, who’s three, is a lot like me. I think we both see life from the same perspective so I can relate to them both very well. But they are free to become what they want in life. We’re just providing them with a canvas of their own.”

Jinggoy makes us see things differently. He never tires of introducing the kids, even me, to new adventures, new experiences, and I’m just so happy with that. I feel so blessed to have him. He always has the energy to be with our kids, to play with our kids, and to be with me, just doing things together. I couldn’t do it without him, hindi ko kaya if ako lang. —Mutya Laxa–Buensuceso


WIKIPEDIA

Father's Day

Father's Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society.

Many countries celebrate it on the third Sunday of June, though it is also celebrated widely on other days by many other countries.


A father with his son by the lake

Father's Day was inaugurated in the United States in the early 20th century to complement Mother's Day in celebrating fatherhood and male.

After Mother's day, people started celebrating Father's Day because there should be a day for fathers too! parenting.

First observance

Grace Golden Clayton may have been inspired by Anna Jarvis' crusade to establish Mother's Day; two months prior, Jarvis had held a celebration for her dead mother in Grafton, West Virginia, a town about 15 miles (24 km) away from Fairmont.

READ MORE...

After the success obtained by Anna Jarvis with the promotion of Mother's Day in Grafton, West Virginia, the first observance of a "Father's Day" was held on July 5, 1908, in Fairmont, West Virginia, in the Williams Memorial Methodist
Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church.

Grace Golden Clayton was mourning the loss of her father when, on December 1907, the Monongah Mining Disaster in nearby Monongah killed 361 men, 250 of them fathers, leaving around a thousand fatherless children.

Clayton suggested her pastor Robert Thomas Webb to honor all those fathers.

Clayton's event did not have repercussions outside of Fairmont for several reasons, among them: the city was overwhelmed by other events, the celebration was never promoted outside of the town itself and no proclamation was made in the City Council.

Also two events overshadowed this event: the celebration of Independence Day July 4, 1908, with 12,000 attendants and several shows including a hot air balloon event, which took over the headlines in the following days, and the death of a 16-year-old girl on July 4.

The local church and Council were overwhelmed and they did not even think of promoting the event, and it was not celebrated again for many years. The original sermon was not reproduced in press and it was lost.

Finally, Clayton was a quiet person, who never promoted the event or even talked to other persons about it.

Establishment of holiday


Father and daughter

In 1910, a Father's Day celebration was held in Spokane, Washington, at the YMCA by Sonora Smart Dodd, who was born in Arkansas. Its first celebration was in the Spokane YMCA on June 19, 1910. Her father, the Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, was a single parent who raised his six children there.

After hearing a sermon about Jarvis' Mother's Day in 1909 at Central Methodist Episcopal Church, she told her pastor that fathers should have a similar holiday honoring them. Although she initially suggested June 5, her father's birthday, the pastors did not have enough time to prepare their sermons, and the celebration was deferred to the third Sunday of June.

Several local clergymen accepted the idea, and on 19 June 1910, the first Father's Day, "sermons honoring fathers were presented throughout the city."

However, in the 1920s, Dodd stopped promoting the celebration because she was studying in the Art Institute of Chicago, and it faded into relative obscurity, even in Spokane.

In the 1930s, Dodd returned to Spokane and started promoting the celebration again, raising awareness at a national level. She had the help of those trade groups that would benefit most from the holiday, for example the manufacturers of ties, tobacco pipes, and any traditional present to fathers.

By 1938 she had the help of the Father's Day Council, founded by the New York Associated Men's Wear Retailers to consolidate and systematize the commercial promotion.

Americans resisted the holiday for its first few decades, viewing it as nothing more than an attempt by merchants to replicate the commercial success of Mother's Day, and newspapers frequently featured cynical and sarcastic attacks and jokes.

However, said merchants remained resilient and even incorporated these attacks into their advertisements. By the mid-1980s, the Father's Council wrote that "(...) [Father's Day] has become a Second Christmas for all the men's gift-oriented industries."

A bill to accord national recognition of the holiday was introduced in Congress in 1913. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson went to Spokane to speak in a Father's Day celebration and wanted to make it official, but Congress resisted, fearing that it would become commercialized.

US President Calvin Coolidge recommended in 1924 that the day be observed by the nation, but stopped short of issuing a national proclamation. Two earlier attempts to formally recognize the holiday had been defeated by Congress.

In 1957, Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith wrote a proposal accusing Congress of ignoring fathers for 40 years while honoring mothers, thus "[singling] out just one of our two parents".

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honoring fathers, designating the third Sunday in June as Father's Day. Six years later, the day was made a permanent national holiday when President Richard Nixon signed it into law in 1972.

In addition to Father's Day, International Men's Day is celebrated in many countries on November 19 for men and boys who are not fathers.

Failed attempts at establishing a Father's Day

In 1911, Jane Addams proposed a city-wide Father's Day in Chicago, but she was turned down.

In 1912, there was a Father's Day celebration in Vancouver, Washington, suggested by Methodist pastor J. J. Berringer of the Irvingtom Methodist Church. They believed mistakenly that they had been the first to celebrate such a day.

They followed a 1911 suggestion by the Portland Oregonian.

Harry C. Meek, member of Lions Clubs International, claimed that he had first the idea for Father's Day in 1915. Meek claimed that the third Sunday of June was chosen because it was his birthday (it would have been more natural to choose his father's birthday).

The Lions Club has named him "Originator of Father's Day". Meek made many efforts to promote Father's Day and make it an official holiday.

Spelling

In the United States, Dodd used the "Fathers' Day" spelling on her original petition for the holiday, but the spelling "Father's Day" was already used in 1913 when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress as the first attempt to establish the holiday, and it was still spelled the same way when its creator was commended in 2008 by the U.S. Congress.

Dates around the world

The officially recognized date of Father's Day varies from country to country. This section lists some significant examples, in order of date of observance.




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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