PHNO SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
SOL VANZI's 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM'
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

THE EVOLUTION OF BRUNCH
Behind each dish in Myrna Segismundo’s table is a story


JUNE 11 ---My best memories come from 1977—I got married, went to New York for the first time, met my Vanzi relatives, and indulged in a four-hour, bottomless champagne brunch. I felt like a probinsyana in the Big Apple. Brunch was new to me. I can still remember the vivid details. A fairy tale buffet spread, made vibrant by fresh flowers, carved fruits, and huge ice sculptures while splendidly dressed staff poured champagne from magnum-sized bottles.

ALSO: The Peninsula’s “Fiesta Filipina” Foodfest Features Chef Myrna Segismundo


JUNE 7 ---Chef Myrna Segismundo’s famous Adobo Pate on bread NOW that the Philippine Independence Day celebration is just a few days away, you can really feel the nationalistic fervor all around you. Hotels, for one, are “turning Filipino” for this occasion by staging Filipino food festivals, and one of the more prominent ones happens to be The Peninsula Manila’s Fiesta Filipina food promotion, which starts tomorrow, Monday, June 8, 2015, and ends on June 19. READ MORE...

ALSO FLASHBACK REPORT: Chef Myrna Segismundo: From My Table To The Peninsula’s Chef Myrna Segismundo is again headlining the Peninsula Manila’s Filipino food festival that will be available at the Escolta and The Lobby.


JUNE 13, 2014---Chef Myrna is the Segismundo is the managing director of Restaurant 9501, the exclusive dining restaurant of ABS-CBN and an ambassador for Filipino cuisine all over the world. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

The evolution of brunch

MANILA, JUNE 15,  2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi June 11, 2015 - My best memories come from 1977—I got married, went to New York for the first time, met my Vanzi relatives, and indulged in a four-hour, bottomless champagne brunch. I felt like a probinsyana in the Big Apple. Brunch was new to me.

I can still remember the vivid details. A fairy tale buffet spread, made vibrant by fresh flowers, carved fruits, and huge ice sculptures while splendidly dressed staff poured champagne from magnum-sized bottles.

READ MORE...
The classy buffet took my breath away: smoked salmon topped jwith cream cheese, oysters with black caviar, foie gras, prawns in herb mayonnaise, eggs Benedict, cold roast chicken, hot poached fish, thin slices of roast beef.

Brunch is a term still used in the Philippines mainly by city folks, whose rural cousins call the meal simply as “a late breakfast.”

Brunch, a word concocted by combining the first and last syllables of “breakfast” and “lunch,” has no Tagalog translation.



ORIGIN

Sociologist Farha Ternikar writes in Brunch:
A History that brunch in New York began in 1896, but its traditions could be traced back to the United Kingdom and the hunt breakfast, where hunters ate the day’s catch.

Reaching America, the hunt breakfast became a meal with eggs, toast, and bacon rather than game meat.

It was known as the varsity meal, associated with college students who, at the time, were mostly white, rich, and male.

By the 1920s, brunch became an opportunity to drink, early in the day.

People ate French toast with mimosas and Bloody Marys. By the 1950s, brunch became more strongly identified with women.

HELLO, MANILA

Finally, in the 1980s, brunch became a leisurely social activity, a development that did not escape the rich-and-famous set in the Philippines.

Five-star hotels built for the IMF-World Bank convention started to offer elaborate Sunday champagne brunches.

Today, brunch with bubbly has become a natural part of city weekends.

Out-of-town weekenders, however, often miss their Sunday brunch, unless the journey includes Tagaytay where young chef Jayme Natividad has introduced a very refreshing alternative to the familiar buffets along Taal Volcano’s ridge.

ALL COMFORT

Last weekend, we tasted some of the best selling courses from Taal Vista Hotel’s brunch menu at the Taza Fresh Table restaurant: southern fried chicken; eggs Benedict; croque madame; steak and eggs; omelets, bacon and egg salad; salad niçoise; pizza margherita; and wagyu burger.

For dessert, the best were molten chocolate cake, vanilla bean custard, olive oil ice cream, and cannoli filled with ube ricotta and langka cream.

ALTERED AND IMPROVED

The salad niçoise had all the traditional ingredients, with a twist or two.

Instead of poached or canned tuna, Chef Jayme used thick slices of ocean-fresh seared tuna caught in nearby Batangas.

There was enough tuna to devour as a dish by itself, so I asked for wasabi and soy sauce and ate the slices sashimi-style. In place of the usual croutons, there was a large wedge of herbed Italian bread, which blended perfectly with the balsamic dressing.

The weather called for red wine instead of mimosa (orange juice and champagne). Strong, brewed coffee from nearby farms capped the day.


FROM FLAVORS OF LIFE BLOG

The Peninsula’s “Fiesta Filipina” Foodfest Features Chef Myrna Segismundo June 7, 2015 12:47 PM by: Dolly Dy-Zulueta


Fiesta Filipina guest chef Myrna Segismundo, flanked by The Peninsula Manila’s executive chef Mike Wehrle and chef de cuisine Gregory George, ringing the bell of the sorbetes cart

NOW that the Philippine Independence Day celebration is just a few days away, you can really feel the nationalistic fervor all around you.

Hotels, for one, are “turning Filipino” for this occasion by staging Filipino food festivals, and one of the more prominent ones happens to be The Peninsula Manila’s Fiesta Filipina food promotion, which starts tomorrow, Monday, June 8, 2015, and ends on June 19.

READ MORE...
Fiesta Filipina features Chef Myrna Segismundo, one of the brightest names in the local culinary scene, as guest chef, and she takes diners on a gastronomic tour of the Philippines, retracing and rediscovering the Spanish influences in the country’s vibrant and colorful culture through the rich flavors of well-loved hearty Filipino dishes.

The two-week Filipino food promotion takes place at The Peninsula Manila’s all-day dining restaurant, Escolta.

Chef Myrna, Kulinarya cookbook author who recently retired from ABS-CBN’s Restaurant 9501, has always been known to be an advocate of Filipino cuisine.

She promotes Filipino cuisine in different parts of the country and abroad, and she was one of the key personalities in the groundbreaking Madrid Fusion Manila 2015, a prestigious world culinary event that had its Philippine version for the very first time last April.

Promoting Filipino gastronomy with her signature dishes has become her life’s mission, with the flavor profiles of her culinary creations ranging from sweet and spicy to smoky and tangy.

It also unlocks a treasure trove of stories from the kitchens of her childhood to those she learned from some of the very best—and at times unheralded—provincial kusineros that she has met along the course of her work.

Her cuisine honors generations-old, time-tested and honed dishes, some of which have almost ‘faded into oblivion.’ She kept them alive, improved on them and made them her own, and continues to share them with food lovers, whether Filipino or otherwise. Lumpiang Ubod; Kilawing Tanigue; Tanigue Sopa de Molo; Batchoy; Flavorful and fork-tender Kaldereta served in a clay pot.

FOR PHOTOS CLICK  HERE

Fiesta Filipina showcases Chef Myrna’s signature dishes, such as Lechon Kawali (twice-cooked crispy pork belly), Adobo Pate (chicken and pork adobo made into a smooth and flavorful pate), Lumpiang Ubod (fresh spring rolls that serve as refreshing appetizers and get the palate ready for the mains), Lechon de Leche (roast suckling pig), Mini Shrimp Okoy (crispy shrimp fritters), Kinilaw Shooters (ceviche of shrimps, tuna and tanigue), Sopa de Molo (chicken soup with vegetables, shrimp and pork dumplings), Chicken Tinola (ginger-flavored chicken broth with green papaya and chili leaves), Batchoy (noodles with pork crackling better known as chicharon), Fabada Filipina (bean stew with ham and chorizo), Pork Binagoongan Paella (cooked rice seasoned with pork and shrimp paste), Pastel de Pollo (chicken casserole), Roast Beef a la Pobre (garlic-rubbed roast prime rib), and Kaldereta (beef stew slow-cooked to fork tenderness).

Fried Chicken Wings with Tamarind Dip Fried Chicken Wings with Tamarind Dip Paksiw na Bangus sa Kamias with Okra Paksiw na Bangus sa Kamias with Okra Pancit with Chicharon Pancit with Chicharon Monggo Soup Monggo Soup Chicken Barbecue Chicken Barbecue During the media launch and tasting held a few days prior to the opening of Fiesta Filipina, Chef Myrna even served awesome Fried Chicken Wings with Tamarind Dip, a simple but very refreshingly flavorful Paksiw na Bangus sa Kamias with Okra, Pancit with Chicharon (stir-fried noodles with pork crackling topping), Monggo Soup, and Chicken Barbecue.

The best, for me, was the Paksiw na Bangus sa Kamias with Okra.

Aside from the fact that I’m partial to fish and seafood dishes over meat dishes, Chef Myrna’s version of Paksiw na Bangus had a very subtle, just right flavor.

The sourness provided by the vinegar wasn’t overpowering–and the fish dish was not fishy at all. It had a clean, fresh flavor.

Chef Claude Tayag, who was at the other long table during the media tasting dinner, loved the Kaldereta. His charming wife Mary Ann said Chef Claude ate two claypots of Chef Myrna’s Kaldereta. That, of course, was a slight exaggeration meant to stress the point that Chef Claude really loved the Kaldereta.

Media colleague Adolf Aran, who was seated right across me and my husband Raff, also enjoyed the Kaldereta, while his lovely wife Alu took a fancy for the Fried Chicken Wings and was fascinated with its tamarind dip.

So much for the main dishes. Now, it’s time for dessert.

Banana-Langka Turon Banana-Langka Turon Batangas Coffee Jelly Batangas Coffee Jelly Queso de Bola Cheesecake Queso de Bola Cheesecake Queso and Ube Sorbetes from the 'dirty ice cream' cart, served on a sugar cone Queso and Ube Sorbetes from the ‘dirty ice cream’ cart, served on a sugar cone

When Chef Myrna entertains, a meal is not complete without dessert, and so, for Fiesta Filipina, she lays out a spread of traditional Filipino sweets, such as Leche Flan, Banana Langka Turon (caramelized banana and jackfruit spring roll, served with sorbet), Batangas Coffee Jelly (served with macapuno balls), Glazed Kamote Fries (caramelized sweet potato fries served with sorbet), and the all-time favorite and Chef Myrna’s own creation and specialty, Queso de Bola Cheesecake.

Fiesta Filipina is available at Escolta’s lunch and dinner buffets at Php1,530 for lunch from Monday to Saturday and Php1,750 for dinner from Monday to Thursday.

The Seafood Buffet dinner every Friday and Saturday is priced at Php2,000, while the Ultimate Sunday Brunch can be had at Php2,200++.

For inquiries or reservations, call 887-2888 or email diningpmn@peninsula.com .


FROM FLASHBACK 2014 FROM the TALESOFTHETUMMY.COM

Chef Myrna Segismundo: From My Table To The Peninsula’s June 13, 2014 by Richard 2 Comments

Chef Myrna Segismundo is again headlining the Peninsula Manila’s Filipino food festival that will be available at the Escolta and The Lobby.

Chef Myrna is the Segismundo is the managing director of Restaurant 9501, the exclusive dining restaurant of ABS-CBN and an ambassador for Filipino cuisine all over the world.

JUNE 13, 2014: This years event is entitled “From My Table to The Peninsula’s: A Celebration of Chef Myrna Segismundo’s Recipes and Culinary Memories“.

The food festival will run from June 16, 2014 to June 29, 2014 only. I got a little sneak taste at the banquet kitchen of the Peninsula Manila together with a number of media people.

Chef-Myrna-SegismundoChef Myrna Segismundo Filipino Food Festival

The spread felt like a fiesta with an abundance of colors and aroma coupled with lively banter of the chef and the guests.

Chef Myrna was on hand to oversee and explain everything that was served that night from the various sauce/sawsawan that Filipinos love to use to the more meaty carving dishes as well as sweet dessert endings.


Chef Myrna Segismundo Buko Martini

We were served a light and refreshing Buko Martini, made using fresh coconut water.

to see (virtually 'taste') of the following and more, click Link below.

A quartet of pates and spreads, Adobo Pate, Kesong Puti Mousse, Tinapa Spread and Tomato Jam, was the first thing we encountered, served with some nice, crusty pandesal. (I had a bad photo, so I used this PR shot).

You can mix and match or just use a single one on the bread, there is really no right way of eating them. Seeing pandesal and adobo together made me think of slathering a layer of adobo pate and topping it with the kesong puti mousse.

This combination was the bomb, I could have stayed at that station eating it all night but the other delightful dishes begged for my attention.

I’m not really a fan of Kilawin but the bright hues of the avocado seduced me. I took a bite, making sure to get both avocado and fish in it and it was a burst of flavors.

Next was the most photographed dish of the night, the Dinuguan Longganisa.

This is Chef Myrna Segismundo’s take on the blood sausage, served with a pickled green mango salsa. I don’t eat dinuguan (pig’s blood stew) but I summoned up the courage to give the dinuguan longganisa a try and I was pleasantly surprised.

Even though the color was a deep black, the sausage was light and meaty with the frying giving it a nice toasty flavor.

The lumpia station featured different variations like the fresh lumpia ubod, or munch away at the fried winged bean and shrimp square or the banana heart and ground pork triangles.

The classics share space with the unusual combinations showcasing Chef Myrna’s ability to experiment with new flavors.

There was also a noodle station featuring 3 different noodles and broths with a plethora of toppings available for you to make your own individual bowl.

One of the chefs told us to be adventurous and included all the 3 kinds of noodles with some shredded chicken and some shrimps with our coconut pandan broth choice.

The broth was delicious, a flavor combination that is familiar in Filipino desserts is given a savory role here and it works.

Chef Myrna Segismundo Boneless Lechon 01Chef Myrna Segismundo Boneless Lechon 02

Carnivores need not be worried as Chef Myrna has got you covered with her Boneless Lechon Belly and Roast Adobo Prime Rib . Get a slice of the crisp and meaty lechon belly and eat with the red wine liver sauce or a side of the stewed fruits chutney for a sweet contrast.

The prime rib adobo is marinated in adobo giving it lovely flavor to the bone, cooked with a nice pink center for tenderness. Flavor it up some more with a dolop of adobo jus.

Some of the desserts we tried was her take on Suman at Mangga, rice cake served in a cup topped with slivers of sweet and ripe Philippine mangoes.

Don’t miss having Chef Myrna’s famous mini banana-langka turon, these are so good I think I had at least 6 of them.

Escolta Buffet Prices:

Monday to Saturday Lunch – P1,530++

Monday to Thursday Dinner – P1,750++

Friday Saturday Dinner – P2,000++

The Ultimate Sunday Brunch – P2,200++

TO SEE Myrna's fabulous, and i.e. 'truly fantabulous' dishes in photos, Click HERE

From My Table To The Peninsula’s
Escolta Restaurant
The Peninsula Manila Corner of Ayala and Makati Avenues 1226 Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Contact No. : (632) 887-2888 Peninsula Manila on Facebook




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE