PHNO SOL VANZI's  TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE PAGE
SOL VANZI's 'TIMPLA'T TIKIM'
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

My secret garden
Rare herbs and greens abound in the unlikeliest places in the city


Whenever my farm-raised Lola Tina ran out of green, leafy vegetables for ginisang munggo, she would send me to the fishponds and rice fields behind Lolo’s jeepney factory to hunt for dampalit, gulasiman, or alusiman, herbs that she used as substitute for ampalaya and malunggay leaves. Those wild creeping plants grew abundantly on the embankment (pilapil) and carabao paths. Ours is probably the last generation raised by parents and grandparents who knew all the names of wild plants and their uses, not just for cooking but also for medicinal purposes. Growing up in Barrio Pulanglupa, I had no inkling that many of the herbs and plants we took for granted or even ignored while growing up in the boondocks would recross my path under expensive foreign names during an exclusive meal prepared by famous chefs. READ MORE...

ALSO: Copyright now protects Papal Mass image


PROTECTED IMAGE – The image of Our Lady of Hope by artist Willy Layug, used for the Papal Mass in Leyte, is now protected by copyright issued by the National Library.
(Malacañang Media Bureau)
The image of Our Lady of Hope used in the historic Papal Mass in Leyte is now copyright-protected. The National Library of the Philippines and the Intellectual Property Office officially issued the copyright on the image Our Lady of Hope of Palo to its carver, Presidential Merit Awardee for Ecclesiastical Art Willy Layug. Layug registered the image under Registration Number H-2015-0016, under which the period of protection extends to 50 years after the artist’s death. He decided to register the image after receiving reports of people who are copying his image and selling the copies for profit. He expressed alarm over the operations of a Manila company which has been producing resin replicas of the image and selling them openly. READ MORE...

ALSO FLASHBACK March 2003 by Sol Vanzi: THE BATTLE OF PULANG LUPA -- FIL-AM WAR MURAL HONORS MARINDUQUE HEROES


March 20, 2003.
The Fil-American War at the turn of the 20th century has definitely been a cruel chapter in our nation's history. Who really started it is just as worse as the bloodbath that ensued, with both protagonists guilty of "the worst scourge of mankind," as Gen. Douglas McArthur put it. The battle at Pulang Lupa, Torrijos, Marinduque, on Sept. 13, 1900, proved this. In that battle, Col. Maximo Abad, together with 37 of his trusted offiers and men, laid out a plan to ambush Capt. Devereux Shields and a hundred of his men in Pulang Lupa. READ MORE...
 


READ FULL MEDIA REPORT HERE:

My secret garden
Rare herbs and greens abound in the unlikeliest places in the city


Philippine carabao in parked mode

MANILA, JUNE 8,  2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi June 4, 2015 - Whenever my farm-raised Lola Tina ran out of green, leafy vegetables for ginisang munggo, she would send me to the fishponds and rice fields behind Lolo’s jeepney factory to hunt for dampalit, gulasiman, or alusiman, herbs that she used as substitute for ampalaya and malunggay leaves.

Those wild creeping plants grew abundantly on the embankment (pilapil) and carabao paths.

Ours is probably the last generation raised by parents and grandparents who knew all the names of wild plants and their uses, not just for cooking but also for medicinal purposes.

Growing up in Barrio Pulanglupa, I had no inkling that many of the herbs and plants we took for granted or even ignored while growing up in the boondocks would recross my path under expensive foreign names during an exclusive meal prepared by famous chefs.


Wild watercress


Purslane


wild spinach


Images by Kyle Victor Jose

READ MORE...

SECRET GARDEN

Unknown to many, these plants grow in wild abandon almost everywhere, even at the heart of the city. Where I live, all it takes is to cross the street (Roxas Boulevard) behind our apartment building and look under the newly planted decorative foliage separating the bike lane from the jogging path. The edible plants are easy to spot once one is familiar with the shapes and colors of their leaves, stems, and flowers.

EXTREMELY VERSATILE

Alusiman or wild watercress looks exactly like the expensive watercress sold seasonally at supermarkets, except for the sturdier and darker stems and leaves. The round leaves are easy to spot. Botanically known as Nasturtium officinale, it has a peppery bite and aroma. This prolific plant is being studied for a cancer-fighting compound called isothiocyanates, a substance that shows promise in blocking the growth of lung tumors.

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) or gulasiman in Filipino is easy to spot, with its reddish stems and yellow flowers. High in nutrients, including vitamins (A, B, B2, C, niacinamide, nicotinic acid, a-tocopherol, B-carotene), minerals, fatty acids (especially omega-3), glutathione, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid, it also contains flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, and urea. This herb is considered antihemorrhagic, antipyretic, diuretic, vulnerary, antiscorbutic, refrigerant, tonic, febrifuge, and anthelmintic.

Wild spinach is almost identical to commercially raised Chinese spinach but with thorns along the main stem. To avoid the thorns, harvest only the leaves, tender ends, and shoots. Desirable are plants that have yet to bloom as their stems, thorns, and leaves are still tender.

HARVEST KINDLY

Plants are living things and should be handled gently. When foraging, never pull entire plants out of the ground. Use scissors, if possible, and cut off the tips only as far as you can use them. Trimming makes plants more bushy and productive. Use an insulated bag with few ice cubes to keep your harvest fresh. Wilting results in reduced nutrients.

WILD TRANSPLANT

The best time to start one’s own garden of wild herbs is after a heavy rain. Using a trowel, dig around the main trunk, making sure the roots are not cut in the process. Wrap wet cloth or a plastic bag around the roots and part of the main trunk, which have been packed with garden soil. Plant in the garden or a pot kept in a sunny spot. Now my secret garden is no secret anymore.


Copyright protects Papal Mass image by Sol Vanzi May 31, 2015


PROTECTED IMAGE – The image of Our Lady of Hope by artist Willy Layug, used for the Papal Mass in Leyte, is now protected by copyright issued by the National Library. (Malacañang Media Bureau)

The image of Our Lady of Hope used in the historic Papal Mass in Leyte is now copyright-protected.

The National Library of the Philippines and the Intellectual Property Office officially issued the copyright on the image Our Lady of Hope of Palo to its carver, Presidential Merit Awardee for Ecclesiastical Art Willy Layug.

Layug registered the image under Registration Number H-2015-0016, under which the period of protection extends to 50 years after the artist’s death. He decided to register the image after receiving reports of people who are copying his image and selling the copies for profit.

He expressed alarm over the operations of a Manila company which has been producing resin replicas of the image and selling them openly.

READ MORE...
Layug revealed plans to replicate the image and use the generated sales for the benefit of people in devastated areas, an alternative that is much better than unscrupulous businessmen profiting from the growing devotion to the Blessed Virgin.

Layug’s work is seven feet tall, including the base of the Blessed Virgin Mary holding the Child Jesus. The Child Jesus is seen extending his hand through a cross to three children in the middle of a storm. Layug donated the original image to the Archdiocese of Palo for the Papal Mass.

The artist explained that the image illustrates how faith guided the people of the Visayas to survive and overcome the calamity that ravaged the region.

The original image of Our Lady of Hope of Palo is currently enshrined at the Palo Cathedral where it is steadily gaining devotees who travel all the way to Palo from various parts of the country.


FLAHBACK --PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE 2003 reported by Sol Jose Vanzi

THE BATTLE OF PULANG LUPA: FIL-AM WAR MURAL HONORS MARINDUQUE HEROES

March 20, 2003. The Fil-American War at the turn of the 20th century has definitely been a cruel chapter in our nation's history. Who really started it is just as worse as the bloodbath that ensued, with both protagonists guilty of "the worst scourge of mankind," as Gen. Douglas McArthur put it.

The battle at Pulang Lupa, Torrijos, Marinduque, on Sept. 13, 1900, proved this. In that battle, Col. Maximo Abad, together with 37 of his trusted offiers and men, laid out a plan to ambush Capt. Devereux Shields and a hundred of his men in Pulang Lupa.

READ MORE...
Niña Vanessa Leynes, a University of the Philippines Los Baños student from Marinduque, mentions that the officers and men belonged to the Marinduque Revolutionary Force's infantry division and militia battalion.

Leynes discloses that "the three columns of the Filipino guerillas surrounded the Americans (in the latter's passageway). The fight lasted the whole morning and ended about two o'clock in the afternoon the following day when the remaining Americans finally surrendered."

For more than a century, the battle at Pulang Lupa was all but unknown to Filipinos, were it not for the sense of history by Gov. Carmencita Reyes.

Reyes tapped the sculptor Bulaong of Bulacan to do a mural of the historic battle. With researchers from the National Historical Institute, namely Porfeo Encomienda, Romeo Sacay and Eleanor Samonte, Bulaong conceptualized the mural using concrete as his medium.

The monumental mural rises on a mountainside some seven kilometers away from the town proper of Torrijos, the site of the bloody battle.

The mural is a pictorial narrative of the history of Torrijos and the almost forgotten battle.

No less than 72 human figures, in high relief, and in various degrees of action and orientation, essay the bloody battle in a total of 60 concrete frames joined together to form a horizontal mural.

The work can be divided into five separate but interconnected thematic sets. The first set on the left side (composed of 12 frames) depicts the resourceful and industrious locals under an overbearing foreigner.

The second set of 12 frames shows Shields and his men trapped in an ambuscade by Captain Abad's contingent. The Filipinos, many of whom were barefooted, engage the enemy in a fierce fight, while the others led their American captives to wherever, perhaps the town plaza for public execution.

In the third set, the protagonists continue to annihilate each other, with the locals obviously enjoying an upperhand. Above is a Filipino about to slash open an American's throat as the latter vainly raises his handgun vertically upward - thus missing his Filipino slasher completely.

The fourth set shows an American down on his knees, presumably Shields, his right arm raised in surrender as his barefooted Filipino captor aims his pointed stake at the American's right underarm. A church on the third layer of concrete frames stands witness to the victory of the Filipinos.

The fifth and final set exhibits the firearms which the Filipinos have captured. As a Filipino warrior counts the captured firearms with the tip of his sword - a symbol of his authority and bravery - the American prisoners of war are led away.

This pictorial narrative points out this gory truth about war: it is a necessary evil; it is brutal, cruel and senseless.

A few weeks ago, Pope John Paul II, obviously pained by the impending US-led war against Iraq, intoned: "War is always a defeat for humanity."

The battle at Pulang Lupa, Torrijos, Marinduque, already proved that in 1900.


Reported by: Sol Jose Vanzi
© Copyright, 2003  by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


GROWING UP IN PULANG LUPA... It was during the term of President Corazon C. Aquino when a law was passed (RA 6702) in 1988 declaring September 13 of every year as “Battle of Pulang Lupa Day”.
PHOTO: Teatro Balangaw group re-enacting the battle in 2007. Up to the present, no study has been made on the origin of “Pulang Lupa” as a place-name. Stories, however, are being told that it refers to pulang lupa, red soil that could be found in the mountain range of Kambindol, (apparently an older name of the same mountain range that could be traced to older maps). Other stories attribute the origin of Pulang Lupa to that bloody battle that transpired there in 1900.




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


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