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THE 'ATAVIO'
Dressing Our Lady of the Abandoned


The Church of Santa Ana stands on the site of the first Franciscan mission established outside Intramuros in 1578. The church was built under the supervision of Fray Vicente Ingles, OFM. The cornerstone of the present church was laid on Sept. 12, 1720 by Francisco dela Cuesta, then Archbishop of Manila and acting governor general of the Philippines. The image of the Nuestra Señora de los Desamparados, also known as Our Lady of the Abandoned, arrived in the Philippines from Valencia, Spain in 1717 where it had been commissioned by Fray Ingles. He was so inspired by the devotion of the Valencianos to the original image that he decided to make the Virgin the patroness of the church that he had been assigned to construct in Santa Ana. READ MORE...

Food tripping, gold digging in Bicol
Two European journalists find adventure, gold, and great food in Bicol


Edd Hancox and Evan Williams, Two European journalists find adventure, gold, and great food in Bicol
 It was like Indiana Jones. The swamp was thick with impenetrable vegetation. Wild chicken roamed, startled by groans from wild boars that echo through the forest canopy. Mud crabs crawled in and out of their hole-homes protected by mounds of hardening clay. Suddenly, a figure emerged from the mud, covered in silt like a creature from a 1950s black-and-white horror flick. His hands clasped a large rock that sparkled when hit by the noonday sun’s rays. He spat out the air hose that kept him alive underwater, submerged for five hours. “Bita!” he yelled. His team of five rushed forward and pulled him and the rock to a waiting raft. All were eager to examine the glittering rock. “Bita! Bita!” they all exclaimed, cheering. Bita is Bicolano for gold vein. The mining team had hit the mother lode!  CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: About 'Images by Kyle Victor Jose'
PHNO's young 'mascot' READ  BELOW...


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

The atavio
Dressing Our Lady of the Abandoned


OUR LADY OF THE ABANDONED

MANILA, MAY 25,  2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi May 18, 2015 (updated) - The Church of Santa Ana stands on the site of the first Franciscan mission established outside Intramuros in 1578.

The church was built under the supervision of Fray Vicente Ingles, OFM. The cornerstone of the present church was laid on Sept. 12, 1720 by Francisco dela Cuesta, then Archbishop of Manila and acting governor general of the Philippines.

The image of the Nuestra Señora de los Desamparados, also known as Our Lady of the Abandoned, arrived in the Philippines from Valencia, Spain in 1717 where it had been commissioned by Fray Ingles.

He was so inspired by the devotion of the Valencianos to the original image that he decided to make the Virgin the patroness of the church that he had been assigned to construct in Santa Ana.

READ MORE...
The arrival of the image in Manila marked the beginning of a solemn ritual that has been observed by parishioners twice a year since 1717: the Atavio de Nuestra Senora de los Desamparados, or The Robing of the Image of Our Lady of the Abandoned.


Clothing is handsewn piece by piece


Crown and aureola,


jewelry and accessories from devotees


Jesus Christ’s Cross

Atavio is a Spanish term which means robing or pagbibihis, to dress up or put on the vestments. The rite of dressing the statue of Our Lady of the Abandoned—before the May 3 start of the Fiesta Novenario and before the Virgin’s Sept. 8 birthday—is a tradition observed for almost three centuries.

The entire robbing ceremony happens inside the camarin, located above the main altar and reached through a granite staircase.

Camarin means a small room, which serves as the Virgin’s dressing room. It is the only one of its kind in Manila, and has been declared a National Cultural Treasure by the National Museum.

The camarera or caretaker, handpicked by the parish priest to look after the icon and the Camarin, exclusively undertakes the painstaking steps of disrobing and robing of the image. The camarera is assisted by female parishioners; a few allowed male devotees stand by at the sidelines to help in moving the image during the process.

The hushed exchange of words between the camarera and her helpers are muffled by the sound of prayers.

Parish priest Father Wilfredo S. Benito, OFM, has enhanced the traditional pagbibihis (dressing) to become a more religious and memorable ritual that can be witnessed by devotees.

The atavio has become a special act of veneration and a more meaningful spiritual experience that can heighten devotion and understanding of the role of Our Lady of the Abandoned in one’s life.

SYMBOLISMS OF THE VIRGIN’S ACCOUTREMENTS

Crown – Symbol that the Blessed Virgin Mary is Queen of Heaven and Earth.

Halo – The halo, or aureola in Spanish and sinag in Tagalog, signifies a saint’s holiness. The twelve stars on the halo could represent the 12 tribes in the Old Testament, the 12 apostles of the New Testament or the 12 Perfections that the Blessed Virgin received from God.

Lily – The image holds a stem of lilies, symbolizing purity.

Half moon and star – Jewel-encrusted half moon or media luna and a six-point star of borealis pinned on her hair indicate purity, beauty, triumph over evil, and the Virgin as guiding star.

Infant Jesus – Cradled in the Virgin’s left arm, a reminder that Christ is the center of devotion to the Mother of God.

Cross – Held by the Infant Jesus, foretells the suffering and death that Christ endured for the salvation of mankind.

Martyred infants – Two infants are attached to the Virgin’s skirt, representing abandoned and martyred children.

Cape – The cape represents the Virgin’s queenship and manifests the caring she showers those who cling to her with full trust and confidence.

VENERATION

After the robing and before the robed image of the Virgin is placed back in the urnacilla, the devotees who witnessed and participated in the rite are given the opportunity to venerate the statue and offer their personal petitions and prayers.

The atavio is an unforgettable ceremony that takes one back to the olden days of religious fervor, incense, litanies, and sheer religious fervor. It is an experience that should not be missed.

For inquiries, call the Church of Our Lady of the Abandoned, Sta. Ana, Manila, 02 564 4203.


Food tripping, gold digging by Sol Vanzi May 21, 2015


Edd Hancox and Evan Williams, Two European journalists find adventure, gold, and great food in Bicol

It was like Indiana Jones. The swamp was thick with impenetrable vegetation. Wild chicken roamed, startled by groans from wild boars that echo through the forest canopy. Mud crabs crawled in and out of their hole-homes protected by mounds of hardening clay.

Suddenly, a figure emerged from the mud, covered in silt like a creature from a 1950s black-and-white horror flick. His hands clasped a large rock that sparkled when hit by the noonday sun’s rays. He spat out the air hose that kept him alive underwater, submerged for five hours.

“Bita!” he yelled.

His team of five rushed forward and pulled him and the rock to a waiting raft. All were eager to examine the glittering rock. “Bita! Bita!” they all exclaimed, cheering.

Bita is Bicolano for gold vein. The mining team had hit the mother lode!

CONTINUE READING.....

Images by Kyle Victor Jose


gold mine rocks in a bed of bukayo


Tuna tail


tuna roe liver in milt and coco cream


igado,


kinunot na pagi

Images by Kyle Victor Jose

That night, they celebrated in the middle of the swamp.

Everything served was caught within a few meters of the gold dig. Kinunot na igat (thrice-cooked river eel), adobong labong (adobong bamboo shoots), and alimango sa gata (mudcrabs in coconut cream) were downed with bottles of Emperador Light.

The miners’ wives brought dessert they had just made: bukayo of young coconut strips coated with caramelized muscovado sugar, perfect with the thick coffee boiled in a tin can on an open fire.

Nothing escaped Evan Williams and Edd Hancox, veteran journalists from London doing a documentary on the lives of small-scale gold miners of Jose Panganiban, a rural-looking but first class town in Camarines Norte, where 15,000 men and teenage boys retrieve the precious metal from mountain boulders and river sand.


The municipality of Jose Panganiban, Camarines Norte--from Wikipedia

Returning to their hotel in the town’s poblacion, Evan and Edd stopped by Evia’s Restaurant, the town’s largest and most popular eatery. They wanted a midnight snack of igado, an Ilocano pork-and-liver dish that has become popular all over the country.

They’re also impressed with the efficient service, inexpensive food, and lovely smiles of teenage staffers Marissa, Princess, Jessica, and Ronalyn who have adopted the two strangers as uncles. On days when the film crew had an early shoot, Evia’s would open hours early. Breakfast and packed lunches would all be ready by the time the foreign filmmakers arrive.

One day, the two bought fresh seafood at the Jose Panganiban public market: a kilo each of giant sugpo (prawn) (P400), large squid (P120), and yellow fin tuna (P150) which the restaurant cooked for them.

That night, they feasted on adobong pusit (squid), halabos na sugpo, and sinigang na tuna.

Their food adventure continued on the long drive from Bicol to the NAIA 3 to catch their flight back to London.

Their last full meal in the Philippines was at Lita’s Seafood House, a very popular truck stop at Pagbilao, Quezon, just a few kilometers south of its border with Atimonan.

They lunched on sugpo, kinamatisang buntot ng tuna, Chinese pig’s feet, kalderetang baka (beef), adobong manok (chicken), pinakbet (mixed Filipino vegetables), and their favorite, tuna fish roe in coconut cream (bihod sa gata).

The bihod (fish innards) came from both male and female tuna so there were chunks of roe as well as tofu-like cubes of milt.

The bits of fat liver felt and tasted like foie gras, with well-cleaned fish stomach providing a contrast in texture.

Staring out the restaurant’s balcony overlooking the sea, Evan and Edd vowed to come back to the Philippines for more stories and more food trips.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: PHNO has a very young 'MASCOT' then, in Kyle Victor Jose. The photo below was shot by Lee in 2005 in Manila. Yes, the young boy in the photo is Kyle who is Sol Jose Vanzi's 'apo' and godson. My last contact with him was when he was just finishing Psychology in college, a few years ago. He was to start postgrad studies to become a psychologist. Today, of course he is not a young boy anymore but a young man, for sure.

 

Kyle Victor Jose and Sol Vanzi, 2005 photo, taken during a PHNO meet at ivory Lane, Levitown, Paranaque, Philippines. PHNO file




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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