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BASQUE FUSION  
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Catalan chef Edgard Barahona demonstrates how sofrito and paella without saffron are made Two days before the grand opening of Madrid Fusion, a select group of gourmands was treated to a preview of some of Spain’s most loved dishes. The venue was perfect: the Manila Diamond Hotel’s spacious Corniche restaurant with its soaring ceiling, indoor palm trees, and a refreshing view of waterfalls and lush tropical foliage. Setting the mood of the afternoon were half a dozen professional flamenco dancers performing breathtaking turns and twists, stomping wildly to the beat of castanets. The longest lines formed at the appetizers buffet. After all, tapas—those small plates of meats, seafood, olives, salmon caviar, and other ingredients that magically transform into heavenly little bites in the expert hands of Catalan chef Edgard Sanuy Barahona—are a way of life in Spain.  READ MORE...

ALSO: Madrid Fusión Manila brings the future of food to the country


After months of preparation and hard work from both the government and private sectors, the future of food is finally here in the country’s capital. Madrid Fusión Manila opened its doors to an international delegation who eagerly awaited the discussions of some of the most renowned and revered names in the culinary world. Madrid Fusión Manila’s first day was historic marked by talks and exhibitions that showcased Spain and the Philippines’ shared cultural heritage, as well as the passion for innovation of the two countries’ respective chefs. The three-day gastronomic congress was opened by Department of Tourism (DOT) Sec. Ramon Jimenez, Jr. He said that Madrid Fusión Manila will confirm the Filipinos’ belief that “the best food and the most enjoyable experience is when food is shared with family and friends.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: Diamond Hotel Celebrates Madrid Fusion with La Fiesta Española


Jamon. Slices of Bread with Spanish Serrano Ham over White
This April, the hotel is ecstatic to hold its first Spanish Food Festival called LA FIESTA ESPAÑOLA at its premiere dining destination Corniche in celebration of the Madrid Fusion Manila festival. The hotel invited guest chef Edgard Sanuy Barahona to prepare authentic Spanish cuisine from April 21 to 26, 2015. Chef Edgard is a young Catalan chef from Lleida, Spain raised in a family of successful chefs. He has worked in Michelin star restaurants and was previously mentored directly by Sergi Arola, one of the top 5 chefs of Spain. He later won the “Chef of the Year 2013” by Foodie Magazine in Hongkong where he is now working. READ MORE...


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

Basque fusion


Manila Diamond Hotel Roxas Boulevard, corner Dr. J. Quintos Street Manila, Philippines The 27-storey, 485-room hotel has a breathtaking view of Manila sunsets. Only minutes away from shopping malls, museums and parks, the hotel boasts of a state-of-the art gym, a tennis court, a luxury spa and a reflexology center.

MANILA, MAY 4,  2015 (MANILA BULLETIN)  by Sol Vanzi -  Catalan chef Edgard Barahona demonstrates how sofrito and paella without saffron are made

Two days before the grand opening of Madrid Fusion, a select group of gourmands was treated to a preview of some of Spain’s most loved dishes.

The venue was perfect: the Manila Diamond Hotel’s spacious Corniche restaurant with its soaring ceiling, indoor palm trees, and a refreshing view of waterfalls and lush tropical foliage. Setting the mood of the afternoon were half a dozen professional flamenco dancers performing breathtaking turns and twists, stomping wildly to the beat of castanets.

The longest lines formed at the appetizers buffet. After all, tapas—those small plates of meats, seafood, olives, salmon caviar, and other ingredients that magically transform into heavenly little bites in the expert hands of Catalan chef Edgard Sanuy Barahona—are a way of life in Spain.

READ MORE...
Equally sought-after at the event was familiar comfort food: callos, pollo al chlindron, pescado con almejas, and, naturally, paella.

1


Hams, sausages, and cured meats


Chef Edgard Sanuy Barahona with his Catalan paella


Precious Russian salad topped with salmon caviar


Little bites of tapas


Cheese on stew


Roasted meat with sauce


Home-cured black olives perk up salads


Giant wheels of rare Spanish cheese

ROYAL BLOODLINE

Chef Edgard has worked in Barcelona, Tarragona, Leida, and Hong Kong, after spending his growing years being tutored in the family kitchen, first by his grandmother and later, by his uncle Josep Barahona, the first Spanish chef awarded with a Michelin star in Asia.

True to his heritage, the young chef worked in several Michelin star restaurants and received the “Chef of the Year 2013” award by Foodie Magazine in Hong Kong.

THE BASIC SAUCE

Sofrito is the first step in making many Spanish dishes. It is a basic sauce which celebrity chef Jose Andres credits for launching a thousand recipes.

Akin to Filipino’s very own ginisa, this essential base is nothing more than very lovingly sautéed onions, tomatoes, paprika, olive oil, a bit of sugar, and bay leaves. Some versions include red and green bell peppers. The sauce can be made ahead and frozen for up to one month or refrigerated for up to five days.

PAELLA SANS SAFFRON

“Saffron is not absolutely necessary when making paella,” revealed chef Edgard to his startled audience during a post-lunch cooking lesson, during which he demonstrated how easy it was to make Catalan paella using what Manileños would consider ordinary and inexpensive ingredients.

He started by stirring cleaned squid in hot olive oil using a shallow pan also called a paellera, all the while reminding the audience that “the squid should caramelize” for maximum flavor. Scallops were next, then the sofrito, which was allowed to simmer before adding the rice.

Chef Edgard stirred the rice in the pan until it was translucent. Then, he slowly poured in the stock. After adding the stock, he cooked the mixture for five minutes over high heat, five minutes on low and then transferred it to the oven to be cooked for five minutes more.

Avoid stirring after the stock was added. He then arranged the rest of the seafood (prawns, mussels, and crab) on the paella. After, he covered it with foil and let it rest for five minutes before serving. He served the paella with lemon wedges and olive oil.

The most preferred rice variety for paella is bomba, short-grained, grown in Spain and absorbs 30 percent more broth. Three cups of stock for every cup of rice is the rule of thumb when using short grain rice. The ratio changes according to the rice variety used.


BOMBA RICE The finer of the two types of rice grown around the town of Calasparra in the Murcia region of Spain. It is the perfect rice for Paella.


MADRIDFUSION.NET

Madrid Fusión Manila brings the future of food to the country  24/04/2015

After months of preparation and hard work from both the government and private sectors, the future of food is finally here in the country’s capital. Madrid Fusión Manila opened its doors to an international delegation who eagerly awaited the discussions of some of the most renowned and revered names in the culinary world.

Madrid Fusión Manila’s first day was historic marked by talks and exhibitions that showcased Spain and the Philippines’ shared cultural heritage, as well as the passion for innovation of the two countries’ respective chefs. The three-day gastronomic congress was opened by Department of Tourism (DOT) Sec. Ramon Jimenez, Jr.

He said that Madrid Fusión Manila will confirm the Filipinos’ belief that “the best food and the most enjoyable experience is when food is shared with family and friends.”

READ MORE...
Madrid Fusión President José Carlos Capel added that the Spanish delegation, most of which are awarded several Michelin stars, had a lot to learn from the Philippines. He also reminded everyone that the Philippines is part of Spain’s rich culinary treasure.

Capel added that the event was an opportunity for the two countries to learn from each other.

On the first day of the congress, most of the discussions centered on familial or regional roots, local ingredients, respect for tradition and passion for innovation.

The first speaker was el rey or the King of Spanish cuisine in Manila, Júan Carlos de Terry, who delivered a highly informative talk on Spain’s culinary roots. He also illustrated Spain’s influence on Philippine cuisine which was coursed through the New World. Assisted by chefs Heny Sison and Rommel Hinlo, de Terry executed a pinakbet making use of garum, an ancient ingredient brought by the Phoenicians to Spain which makes use of the innards of red meat tuna, which in turn is similar to the Pinoy bagoong.

One poignant point in de Terry’s talk was when he praised the late culinary Philippine icon, Nora Daza, to whom, he said, generations of Filipino chefs owe a great deal of gratitude due to her pioneering work.

Following de Terry was Quique Dacosta who talked about the many facets and uses of rice. In the first part of his talk, Dacosta presented three traditional ways of cooking rice: dry, creamy and soupy.

“Rice is the medium or bridge of flavors. There is so much more to rice though. Its by-products have a myriad of uses.” He ended his presentation with a delicate socarrat, topped with aioli, lemon juice, wild herbs and garlic flowers.

Chef Fernando Aracama shared his childhood experiences of growing up in the province savoring sour fruits such as green mangoes and kamias. Aracama prepared food that characterized his Negrense family roots: his Mamá’s burong mangga (pickled green mangoes), a kinilaw na talaba, candied santol and finally, a hearty KBL (Kadyos, Baboy, at Langka) with a broth soured with batuan.

The guests and the chef-presenters then feasted on the sumptuous lunch sponsored by the Department of Agriculture and curated by chef and food writer Angelo Comsti. The dishes presented was a representation of the various cuisines in Luzon, but with a modern twist. Some of these were kinilaw, laing, morcon, and leche flan enriched with pig’s blood.

After lunch, world-renowned chef Elena Arzak, daughter of Júan Mari Arzak, spoke on how her Basque ancestry never fails to appear in the innovative dishes she and her team create.

Arzak thrilled the participants with showcases of molecular gastronomy and introduced them to cocina frondosa (leafy cuisine), which maximizes tree or vegetable leaves as either a medium of cooking or a major ingredient in the dishes. In an impassioned talk, Arzak spoke of her team’s relentless quest to creatively produce dishes that are sustainable, and that will lead people closer to nature.

Following Arzak was the lively Myrna Segismundo who shared the coconut tree’s numerous uses, and how the Spanish chefs can sustain livelihoods and enhance their own food if they bring home with them any of the by-products of the versatile tree. Among the dishes she presented was a deconstructed ginataang halo-halo.

Segismundo suggested that it is time that Philippine cuisine be marketed and introduced through the different flavour profiles of ingredients unique to the Philippines: matamis (sweet), maalat (salty), maasim (acidic), mapait (bitter) and malinamnam (umami).

Francis Paniego then presented a sensory talk on Spanish marinades and innovative ways of cooking the lowly offal such as hearts, ears, snouts, blood, tendons, brains and kidneys.

Examples of the dishes included a tempura-inspired way of cooking lamb ears and pork skin prepared as ramen, spaghetti and callos. He also asserted the importance of tradition, his regional landscape and its produce to the cuisine he produces.

“Our kitchen is always inspired by our region. We update the old tradition of cooking offal through a rigorous process. Creating new dishes is like giving birth: there are birth pains.”

Finally, Mario Sandoval closed the evening with a mouth-watering presentation on the science of roasts. Sandoval demonstrated the precision by which he and his team prepare their famous cochinillo (roast suckling pig). He also reiterated that one thing non-negotiable is taste.

“We believe in the motto ‘In Taste We Trust’. We can deliver a well-constructed, aesthetically-pleasing dish but the taste should always be priority.”

All in all, Madrid Fusión Manila’s first day saw a gathering of passionate individuals who are committed to promote cuisines which are rooted in tradition and fuelled by an innovative spirit. From the congress,

participants were able to learn that fusion happens when cultures compliment and interact with one another, and when individual men and women help each other innovate for more appetizing, sustainable and healthier cuisines.

Opening on the same day was the trade exhibition with 165 booths, 30 of which are from Spain. The Spanish pavilion featured seminars on wine, brandy, Jamon Iberico and cold cuts. Meanwhile, seminars on Philippine heirloom rice and chocolates were the highlights of the Philippine pavilion.

The tunnels, a new experience in trade exhibitions, were busy with guests lining up to experience Philippine cheeses, jams, honey, nuts and grapes, Philippine liquors and cocktails paired with chorizo, among others.

For information on the chefs and the activities, please visit http://madridfusionmanila.com


FROM BUSINESSANDCOMMERCE.ASIA/2015

Diamond Hotel Celebrates Madrid Fusion with La Fiesta Española


DIAMOND HOTEL

Diamond Hotel Philippines joins the country’s celebration of the 1st Madrid Fusion Manila.

The occasion is widely famous and flamboyantly celebrated in the country of origin, and that’s how it will be staged, in all its grand glory.


Jamon. Slices of Bread with Spanish Serrano Ham over White

This April, the hotel is ecstatic to hold its first Spanish Food Festival called LA FIESTA ESPAÑOLA at its premiere dining destination Corniche in celebration of the Madrid Fusion Manila festival.

The hotel invited guest chef Edgard Sanuy Barahona to prepare authentic Spanish cuisine from April 21 to 26, 2015.


Edgard Sanuy Barahona

Chef Edgard is a young Catalan chef from Lleida, Spain raised in a family of successful chefs. He has worked in Michelin star restaurants and was previously mentored directly by Sergi Arola, one of the top 5 chefs of Spain. He later won the “Chef of the Year 2013” by Foodie Magazine in Hongkong where he is now working.

READ MORE...
A scrumptious line-up of much anticipated Spanish dishes for everyone to enjoy will be available for a limited time at the lunch or dinner buffet. Begin your Hispanic culinary journey with Spanish cold soup Gazpacho then go with the appetizing Watermelon Sangria Infused or Arbequina Olives Marinated in Thyme and Orange.

Few of the delicious salad options are Seafood Salad with Avocado and Lime Mayonnaise and Russian Potato Salad and Salmon Roe. Servings of T-bone with Chimichurri Sauce and Mustards as well as Strip Loin, Mojo Rojo and Mojo Verde are aplenty. Partake of the Lunch Buffet for Php1,988nett per person or Dinner Buffet for Php2,550nett per person.

Prefer to indulge in an exclusive degustation 8-course dinner paired with fine Spanish wines on April 22, 2015 at the Constellation on the 27th floor for Php4,500nett per person.

The Sky Lounge and Lobby Lounge will be serving its own Spanish specialties such as the classic prime tapas for the entire period.

La Fiesta Española Spanish Food Festival is in partnership with Amphora Merchants Wines & Cavas and Maset Wines & Cavas. For reservations call (632) 528-3000 ext. 1121.
 




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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