SOL VANZI's TIMPLA'T  TIKIM THIS PAST WEEK...       
KITCHEN RESOLUTIONS FOR 2015

This new year, organize your kitchen, start a kitchen club, and take culinary risks. 

At the start of every year, most experienced cooks and efficient homemakers often feel the need to make changes in their kitchens. These could mean a new menu, new appliances, or new cooking methods. For ordinary housewives, working professionals, and single parents, changes could mean more affordable yet healthier meals through smart budgeting, efficient storage, and new preparation methods. READ MORE....

FOR CHINESE NEW YEAR CULINARY ADVENTURE: DIM SUM GALA

What is Dim Sum
Dim Sum is a style of Cantonese food prepared as small bite-sized or individual portions of food traditionally served in bamboo steamer baskets and on small plates. Eating dim sum at a restaurant is known in Cantonese as going to “drink tea” as tea is typically served with dim sum. For many Chinese  families, dim sum is treated as a weekend meal to reunite the family. Dim Sum chefs undergo many years of rigorous training in order to deliver the hundreds of tapas items that are offered on the menu. READFULL REPORT...


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

Kitchen Resolutions for 2015
This new year, organize your kitchen, start a kitchen club, and take culinary risks.


PHOTO COURTESY OF NUTRITIONEDUCATIONSTORE.COM

MANILA, JANUARY 5, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi  -: At the start of every year, most experienced cooks and efficient homemakers often feel the need to make changes in their kitchens. These could mean a new menu, new appliances, or new cooking methods. For ordinary housewives, working professionals, and single parents, changes could mean more affordable yet healthier meals through smart budgeting, efficient storage, and new preparation methods.


TASTE TEST: Enough of fried everything. Learn simple but well-thought-of dishes like this pan de sal pizza

OUT WITH THE OLD

The holiday break—when everyone is home to help—is a good opportunity to clear out the pantry and clean the refrigerator and freezer. Check all the cans and jars of ingredients. Throw out those that have expired. Resolve to rotate the stocks on a first-in-first-out principle.

While defrosting the fridge and freezer, keep perishable food items in an ice box, packed with ice. Discard un-labelled leftovers.

Never take a chance with food. Make it a habit to tightly pack and properly label (with date) all food items in the fridge and freezer.

WISE BUYS

Keep track of the household’s consumption of basic commodities and decide whether you should purchase in bulk or in larger packages. Purchase tightly covered bins for flour, corn starch, sugar, pasta, and packaged mixes. Paste labels outside for easy retrieval when needed.

COMMUNAL PURCHASING

All cooks get annoyed whenever there is a specific ingredient in the recipe that they don’t have in their kitchens. It is just as frustrating to not be able to try out a recipe just because they don’t have the required kitchen equipment.

Purchasing a complete line of spices and herbs can easily deplete one’s food budget.


Love the cute paper labels threaded around the neck of the jars.

So, a group of friends formed a kitchen club of sorts, purchased ingredients in bulk, and repacked them in recycled pill bottles for each member. Silica gel sachets from noodles and medicine packs keep the spices and herbs fresh and dry.

This culinary sisterhood hopes to expand their cooperative purchasing. They now plan to collectively buy a pasta-making machine that members can borrow and bring home, on rotation, to make noodles, lasagna, ravioli, and wonton at home.

Next on their list is a food processor with mixer, grinder, and sausage stuffer attachment.

TASTE ADVENTURES

In the good old days, families were content with a short list of daily dishes: adobo, nilaga, prito, paksiw, pinangat, menudo, tinola, inihaw, and kare-kare.

Birthdays meant pancit, spaghetti, ice cream, and hotdogs.

Today, Filipino taste buds have become more sophisticated after being exposed to dishes from international food chains and daily food shows on TV.

It is, therefore, virtually required for wives, mothers, housekeepers, girlfriends, and fiancées to be familiar with the preparation of popular foreign dishes.

Kitchen novices should start with simple stuff like breaded chicken and pork chops, gravy, cream pasta sauce like alfredo or carbonara, pan de sal pizza, adobo or BBQ shawarma.

Learn simple salad dressings such as those served at popular chain restaurants.

Then, graduate to baked eggplant with pasta sauce and melted cheese.


PASTA WITH EGGPLANT


CHINESE NEW YEAR CULINARY ADVENTURE: DIM SUM GALA

Celebrate the 2015 Chinese New Year of the Goat with Shangri-la Banquet Hall’s first-ever Dim Sum

Dim Sum Selection
Steamed:
● “Har Gow” - Shrimp Dumpling
● “Siu Mai” - Pork and Dried Scallop Dumpling
● Glutinous Rice Roll
● Goji and Vegetable Dumpling
● Peanut, Minced Pork, and Vegetable Dumpling
● Bean Curd Puff filled with Shrimp Mousse
● Minced Beef Ball
● Glutinous Rice with Pork and Preserved Sausage wrapped in Lotus Leaf
● White Steamed Bun filled with BBQ Pork

Baked/ Deep Fried:
● Deep Fried Fish Fillet
● Bacon & Shrimp in Thai Sauce
● Shrimp Roll filled with Shredded Chicken and Celery
● Bean Curd Roll filled with Vegetables
● Deep Fried Taro Dumpling
● Honey Glazed Short Rib
● Deep Fried Dumpling filled with Pork and Preserved Shrimp
● Seafood Pancake
● Baked Conch and Seafood Pie
● BBQ Pork and Pineapple Puff
● Skewer of Lemongrass Marinated Chicken

Specialty
● Deep Fried Spicy Assorted Mushrooms
● Pan Fried Rice Noodles in Spicy XO Sauce
● Fried Rice with Minced Beef and Korean Kimchi

Dessert:
● Egg Yolk Tart
● Sesame Ball filled with Pumpkin Infused Egg Yolk
● Green Tea Sponge Cake layered with Red Bean Paste
● Traditional Custard Cake
● White Steamed Bun filled with Egg Custard

Tea Tasting:
● Jasmine Tea
● Pu-erh Tea
● Shoumei Tea
● Tie Guan Yin Tea

What is Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year marks the beginning of the new lunar calendar year in Chinese culture. This
celebration remains the most important social and economic holiday in China. This holiday is a time to
honor household and heavenly deities as well as ancestors. In preparation for the holidays, homes are
thoroughly cleaned to get rid of bad luck that might have been collected throughout the old year. Ritual
sacrifices of food and paper icons are offered to gods and ancestors. People post scrolls printed with lucky
messages on household doors and set off firecrackers to frighten evil spirits. Elders give out money in red
packets to children to bring good luck and prosperity in the New Year. Most importantly, families gather
for feasting to celebrate their unity.
What is Dim Sum
Dim Sum is a style of Cantonese food prepared as small bite-sized or individual portions of food
traditionally served in bamboo steamer baskets and on small plates. Eating dim sum at a restaurant is
known in Cantonese as going to “drink tea” as tea is typically served with dim sum. For many Chinese
families, dim sum is treated as a weekend meal to reunite the family. Dim Sum chefs undergo many years
of rigorous training in order to deliver the hundreds of tapas items that are offered on the menu.




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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