SOL VANZI's TIMPLA'T  TIKIM THIS PAST WEEK...

SUSTAINABLE GIFTS FROM THE COUNTRYSIDES 
Food products as gifts for Christmas are becoming very popular. Here’s why.
In recent years, food products have become very popular among Christmas gift givers due mainly to the economic situation and the growing popularity of TV shows and magazines that focus on culinary arts. Another worldwide trend is the use of sustainable and indigenous products. Last week, we found edible gift items that are great gifts and, at the same time, help communities. READ FULL STORY...

ALSO: DSWD successfully holds nationwide bazaar of Pantawid Pamilya, livelihood beneficiaries 

PHOTO: Ms. Evelyn Cafon, 39, a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary from Lambahak, Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, selling bags and accessories made of indigenous materials like T’nalak and beads at the PaskuJuan Bazaar in Araneta Center. Photo shows Evelyn explaining the products made by the beneficiaries in Lake Sebu to Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman and other patrons. Left photo shows the Secretary and Sustainable Livelihood Program Director Georgina Ann Hernandez pose with the Pantawid Pamilya women-beneficiaries from Marikina who won in the Paligsayahan talent contest. --Citing the active participation of partner-beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program in the ‘PaskuJuan Bazaar 2014: Salu-Salo sa Pagbabago’ over the weekend, at the Araneta Center, Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that the poor can actually become instrumental of their own development. READ FULL REPORT...
 


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Sustainable gifts from the countryside

MANILA, DECEMBER 1, 2014
(MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi - In recent years, food products have become very popular among Christmas gift givers due mainly to the economic situation and the growing popularity of TV shows and magazines that focus on culinary arts. Another worldwide trend is the use of sustainable and indigenous products.

Last week, we found edible gift items that are great gifts and, at the same time, help communities.

A vocal critic of the government’s conditional cash transfer (CCT) program, I attended the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s (DSWD) Bangon Kabuhayan conference with cynicism. Not even the title of the meet, “Philippine Business for Inclusive Growth through Harnessing Sustainable Livelihoods,” placated my doubtful mind.

My outlook changed after that afternoon’s close encounter with Filipinos from the countryside who are using the CCT allotments to slowly, but steadily remove the veil of poverty from their homes and towns.


HAVE YOUR GIFT AND EAT THEM, TOO -- clockwise from top: Banana chips from Antique, all-natual ube halaya in bamboo, and tube turmeric tea tycoon (OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Images by Kyle Victor Jose)

Food as Savior

Members of the small group I interacted with were all engaged in small-scale production of food items using ingredients that abound in their localities. There are teas from powdered ginger and turmeric, sweets from purple yam, known locally as ube, chips from bananas and taro (gabi), and various fish products.

“Ginger (luya) and turmeric (luyang dilaw) grow like weeds around us in Barangay Aningalan, San Remigio, Antique, but we never before used them for anything but paksiw and other fish recipes,” says Gloria Juayang, who produces herbalsteas in sachets containing turmeric and ginger.

Price: P5/sachet (retail); P3/sachet (wholesale). 63 917 905 3450; 63 927 569 8648

The Department of Agriculture assists her by increasing root production while the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) steps in with packaging and mechanization advice. The Bank of Philippine Islands signed up with DSWD’s campaign in March to help get the project off the ground.


[PHOTO --The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has entered into a formal partnership agreement with BPI Globe BanKO (BanKO) to help improve financial literacy of beneficiaries of the government agency’s socio-economic mobility program. The two parties have recently signed the memorandum of agreement (MOA) to formalize the partnership and possibly to open more doors for future collaborations between them.

DSWD through its Sustainable Livelihood Program, aims to further empower Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program member-families through entrepreneurial and employment opportunities. The DSWD-Sustainable Livelihood Program conducts basic business management and employment trainings alongside time management, financial literacy, and technical and vocational skills trainings. It also provides pre-employment assistance supported by partner institutions from the public and private sectors. FROM GLOBE WEBSITE]

Rob Nazal, chief development officer of BPI’s BanKo project, explained that “Many people in the countryside are prevented from availing loans because of the stringent requirements such as collateral and credit history. We are adapting a novel approach to assist participants of DSWD’s Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).”

Small entrepreneurs enrolled in SLP and CCT now use the program’s mobile transfer system using Globe to access their loans and remittances.

Untraditional Chips


Taro (pronounced, terō) is a tropical plant grown primarily as a vegetable food for its edible corms and secondarily as a leaf vegetable grown as a staple in the Pacific

The most nutritious chips, made from taro, are also the most expensive, especially in Hawaii. Seeing how profusely giant taro abound


TARO CHIPS: Thinly sliced taro cooked to a crisp perfection and lightly salted to create the most delightful snack that could only come from Hawai'i.

in San Francisco, Quezon, the DSWD SLP program convinced villagers to go into taro chips production.

The product immediately became a hit in local markets, and there have been inquiries from repackers who make bulk orders (P220 per kilo) of unflavored banana and taro chips.

Price: P10 for 40 grams, P20 for 80 grams, and P25 for 100 grams. 63 926 579 7163; 63 9175698648

Christmas Sweet

For many families, Christmas dinner always includes halayang ube, made by stirring together for three hours the following ingredients: purple yam, condensed milk, evaporated milk, sugar, and butter.

Villagers from San Francisco, Quezon pack this in natural bamboo tubes with bamboo serving spoon. Price: P180 for 400 grams. 63 910 4369951 63 930 3583724


DSWD successfully holds nationwide bazaar of Pantawid Pamilya, livelihood beneficiaries Posted on 02 December 2014.


Ms. Evelyn Cafon, 39, a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary from Lambahak, Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, selling bags and accessories made of indigenous materials like T'nalak and beads at the PaskuJuan Bazaar in Araneta Center. Photo on your left shows Evelyn explaining the products made by the beneficiaries in Lake Sebu to Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman and other patrons. Photo on your right shows the Secretary and Sustainable Livelihood Program Director Georgina Ann Hernandez pose with the Pantawid Pamilya women-beneficiaries from Marikina who won in the Paligsayahan talent contest.

Citing the active participation of partner-beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program in the ‘PaskuJuan Bazaar 2014: Salu-Salo sa Pagbabago’ over the weekend, at the Araneta Center, Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that the poor can actually become instrumental of their own development.

This was evident when these families joined the first nationwide bazaar where they sold the products which they produced using the capital assistance provided by DSWD through the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

SLP is a community-based capacity building program that seeks to improve the socio-economic status of beneficiaries. It is implemented through the Community-Driven Enterprise Development (CDED) approach, which engages beneficiaries to actively contribute to production and labor markets by making use of available resources and accessible markets.

The program aims to enable the beneficiaries to manage sustainable micro-enterprises or link them to locally available jobs that will enhance their access to basic social services and improve their standard of living.

Gloria Humiwat, 41, a beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilya for two years now, from Loakan, Baguio City said, “Laking pasasalamat ko sa DSWD dahil dito sa bazaar na ito nabigyan kami ng pagkakataon na maibenta ang aming mga produkto. Sana po meron ulit ganito sa susunod na taon at sana ay mas mahaba ang araw (We thank the DSWD for this bazaar because it gave us the opportunity to sell our products. We hope that this will be conducted again next year and hopefully, too, that it will be longer).”

Evelyn Cafon, 39, from Lambahak, Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, shared, “Magmula noong naging benepisaryo kami ng Pantawid Pamilya noong 2011 hanggang naging SLP beneficiaries kami, hindi namin naramdaman na pinabayaan kami ng DSWD. Ngayon, tumutulong pa rin sila at dahil sa bazaar na ito ay malaking tulong at oportunidad na dumami ang aming customer (Since we became beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilya in 2011 and eventually SLP, DSWD has not stopped helping us. With this bazaar, we had the chance to expand our market).”


Grace Ferrer while selling her homemade peanut butter

In her message during the program, Sec. Soliman said, “Ang presensiya ng mga benepisyaryo dito ngayon ay patunay na sila ay hindi lamang umaasa sa binibigay ng gobyerno kundi sila mismo ay nagsisikap iangat ang kanilang buhay mula sa kaunting tulong na naibigay ng gobyerno (The presence of the partner-beneficiaries here is proof that they are not dependent on government aid alone but they exert their best effort to improve their lives).”

Sec. Soliman added that the goal of the bazaar was to help Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries who are also SLP beneficiaries market their products.

Sec. Soliman and DSWD development partners led shoppers in patronizing the products of the beneficiaries.
One of the highlights the festival was the talent competition of Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries.

In her closing message, SLP Director Georgina Ann H. Hernandez said that with the success of the activity, DSWD intends to hold a yearly bazaar to provide a permanent venue to market the products of the beneficiaries. The PaskuJuan Bazaar was held simultaneously in various venues nationwide.

For all those interested to buy the products and help the beneficiaries achieve self-sufficiency, they may coordinate with the SLP office at (02) 951-2806 or send an email to slp_group@dswd.gov.ph ###




Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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