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EVERYBODY LOVES FRENCH TOAST, A WORLDWIDE FAVORITE 
What you can do with leftover bread and meat this holiday season

Breakfast on school days was always challenging: feeding five kids and getting them to the school bus on time meant having a menu that was nutritious, filling, and easy to prepare. At least once a week, that meant French toast, a worldwide favorite. Easy As 1-2-3 ---Nov. 28 is celebrated in the United States as National French Toast Day in honor of this classic dish that can be eaten at all hours, from the start to the end of the day. It needs only a handful of ingredients, which are found in every kitchen pantry, and involves only three easy steps to prepare, from start to finish. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: America’s Thanksgiving and the Philippines’ National Heroes Day
Two Holidays Rooted in History and Tradition

To some of us Thanksgiving means a day off from work, reunion with the family and friends, and a sumptuous feast of turkey, ham and pumpkin pie. But to most of us, this holiday has a much deeper meaning. It is the day of giving thanks to the Lord for the abundant blessings we have received. Thanksgiving is always a tender time, a unifying ritual. It’s also a day of rejoicing because the seeds of democracy sown on our shores years ago, continue to blossom and take root in other countries as well. National Heroes Day ---The Philippines does not celebrate Thanksgiving Day. What is traditionally celebrated at the end of November is the National Heroes Day. An elaborate program of activities consisting of military and civic parades, the laying of wreaths in front of the national monuments, and solemn masses in various cathedrals, will be done throughout the country.READ THE FULL REPORT...


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

Everybody loves French toast
What you can do with leftover bread and meat this holiday season

(Images by Kyle Victor Jose)


FRENCH's "P
oor knight’s pudding"

MANILA, NOVEMBER 10, 2014 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi - Breakfast on school days was always challenging: feeding five kids and getting them to the school bus on time meant having a menu that was nutritious, filling, and easy to prepare.

At least once a week, that meant French toast, a worldwide favorite.

Culinary historians say French toast is not even French.

Recipes for French toast have been traced back to ancient Roman times, and one of the original names for the dish is pain a la Romaine or Roman bread.

The French call it pain perdu (lost bread) in reference to recovering day-old bread.

For Spaniards it is torrijas. Germans refer to it as arme ritter, while the English say eggy bread.

In nearby Hong Kong, it is traditional to spread peanut butter or jam on bread before soaking the slices in milk and egg.

The origin of French toast is unknown, but recipes date back to the 16th century in Europe.

French toast was known in England as “poor knight’s pudding” because it was the only dish that a poor starving knight could afford.

Easy As 1-2-3

Nov. 28 is celebrated in the United States as National French Toast Day in honor of this classic dish that can be eaten at all hours, from the start to the end of the day.

It needs only a handful of ingredients, which are found in every kitchen pantry, and involves only three easy steps to prepare, from start to finish.

Step 1: Cut any unsweetened bread (pan de sal, French baguette, pan delimon) into ˝-inch slices, or use any pre-sliced sandwich bread.

Step 2: Soak bread slices in beaten mixture of the following ingredients: one egg, one cup milk, and a few drops of vanilla.

Step 3: Fry the slices in a mixture of butter (or margarine) and vegetable oil until both sides of the bread turn golden.

Serve the French toast topped with any syrup, jam, jelly, canned fruit, powdered sugar, cinnamon, cream, or fresh berries.

Add a side dish of ham, bacon, or sausages. Filipinos outside urban areas prefer a topping of white sugar and evaporated or condensed milk.

Instant Dinner Fare


MONTE CRISTO SANDWICH

If you know how to make French toast, you will enjoy preparing Monte Cristo sandwich, a popular snack or dinner dish that many hosts find very convenient when there are unexpected visitors.

Here are the steps to make Monte Cristo sandwiches:

Step 1: Make plain ham and cheese sandwiches and soak them in an egg and milk mixture, omitting the vanilla.

Step 2: Pan-fry the sandwiches over medium heat until both sides are golden and the cheese melts.

Step 3: Slice in half and serve warm.

For variation, use any meat or sausages in the refrigerator.

Here’s a tip for this holiday season: French toast is a great way to use leftovers like lechon, roasted chicken, cooked/canned fish, and adobo.

NOVEMBER 27, 2014---HAPPY THANKSGIVING DAY, AMERICA!

FROM PHILSTAR

Thanksgiving moments, 2 years ago SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 29, 2012 - 12:00am 1 11 googleplus0 0

Last Thursday, we celebrated Thanksgiving Day, a tradition borrowed from the US which makes it a national holiday on the fourth Thursday of every November. The US practice is family-oriented and today, more and more Filipinos are observing the tradition by gathering clans at the dinner table. Turkey and pumpkin pie are the US staples in a Thanksgiving meal.

Thanksgiving is a sentimental occasion, it’s about coming home, being with family and sharing happy times. In the US, it’s up there in the list of most treasured holidays with Christmas and New Year’s Day. Airports, train stations and bus terminals are packed with travellers making their way home from ports of work for Thanksgiving dinner.

* * * *

Celebrating Thanksgiving in the Philippines isn’t as widespread but it’s slowly gaining ground. It’s a wonderful reason to get together with family, to reconcile if there is rancor, to rebond if there is detachment, to thank God for life. Giving thanks to the Lord on Thanksgiving Day for everything He has done is the highlight of the celebration. Yet we should remember to give thanks not just one day of the year but every day of the year, every day that we wake up to a new day.

On a personal note, our family received a beautiful Thanksgiving message from my sister Irene and her husband Jordan who live in New Jersey. They’ve just survived a harrowing ordeal in coping with storm Sandy.

Here’s their Thanksgiving message – “Happy moments, praise God…difficult moments, seek God…busy moments, believe God…quiet moments, worship God…waiting moments, trust God…painful moments, pray God…lovely moments, thank God – joy, happiness, health…all these and many more are my wishes for you.”

These are Thanksgiving wishes we could share with all our loved ones.

The day after Thanksgiving is called Black Friday in the US and it signals the start of the Christmas shopping season.

While not a national holiday, not too many show up for work on Black Friday because that’s when a lot of stores drop prices on items to ridiculously low levels.

It’s called Black Friday to signify that businesses are “in the black” or turning a profit.

This US tradition, however, hasn’t caught on locally. Consumers, of course, can’t wait for it to happen.

FROM THE ASIAN JOURNAL

America’s Thanksgiving and the Philippines’ National Heroes Day: Two Holidays Rooted in History and Tradition

To some of us Thanksgiving means a day off from work, reunion with the family and friends, and a sumptuous feast of turkey, ham and pumpkin pie. But to most of us, this holiday has a much deeper meaning. It is the day of giving thanks to the Lord for the abundant blessings we have received.

Thanksgiving is always a tender time, a unifying ritual. It’s also a day of rejoicing because the seeds of democracy sown on our shores years ago, continue to blossom and take root in other countries as well.

History books say that Thanksgiving is the story of people, of different races bound together by one of the greatest of human needs – the need for survival.

This holiday tradition originated in Massachusetts, a part of our country which has been, from its founding, a leading force of culture and tradition. Boston, its capital, is synonymous with high achivement in American culture and artistry.

History is woven into the very fabric of life in Massachusetts. The arrival of the Pilgrims in December 21, 1620 was significant, yet the native Indians had already found this corner of the country hundreds of years earlier.

During their first winter in the new country, the Pilgrims lived aboard their ships and suffered the loss of 47 colonists, victims of the same epidemic that decimated thousands of Indians. When the Pilgrims at last decided to go ashore to look for food, Samoset, a Pemaquid Indian from Maine, welcomed them with the peace cry in English, “Much welcome, Englishmen!”

Their common effort at survival gave rise to the feast of Thanksgiving, the first and most characteristic celebration of the American people. Samoset introduced his friend Massassoit, chief of the Wampanoags, and other Indian braves to the Piligrims. Settlers had long feared Massachusetts for its hostile Indians, but relative peace prevailed because of a pact with Massassoit.

In 1621, Massachusetts Bay Governor William Bradford invited the neighboring Indians for a three-day festival in gratitude for the bounty of the season. By the end of the 19th century, Thanksgiving Day had become an institution throughout America and was officially proclaimed a national holiday by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863.

I give Thanks for …

I give thanks to the Lord, first of all, for giving me life. A life of abundance in this beautiful country!

Abundance, not only of money and material possessions, but an abundance of blessings: wonderful family and friends, beautiful places I have visited, and the wealth of memories. Best of all, I am doing what I love doing most – writing and speaking – not only locally but also nationally.

I love America – a country where prosperity is a given. True, there are some poor people in America, you may say.

But, as columnist Cal Thomas of the Military Press newspaper wrote, “Even the poorest of us is richer than much of the world’s poor, and the poor in America at least have the opportunity to climb out of poverty, when this opportunity is virtually nonexistent in much of the rest of the world.”

Philippine National Heroes Day

The Philippines does not celebrate Thanksgiving Day.

What is traditionally celebrated at the end of November is the National Heroes Day. An elaborate program of activities consisting of military and civic parades, the laying of wreaths in front of the national monuments, and solemn masses in various cathedrals, will be done throughout the country.

Every Filipino is familiar with well-known Philippine heroes like Jose Rizal, Andres Bonifacio, Apolinario Mabini, Gregorio del Pilar, Emilio Jacinto, Gomburza (Fathers Gomez, Burgos, and Zamora), Lapu-lapu, and Marcelo del Pilar.

But the lesser-known heroes are vaguely remembered and often forgotten during National Heroes Day. This doesn’t mean that these heroes have contributed less to the country, because they, and thousands of other unnamed and unsung heroes, had an equal share in the making of the Philippines.

Lesser-known Filipino Heroes

Here are some of our lesser-known Filipino heroes:

Pvt. Tomas Claudio, the First Filipino to die in World War I at the battle of Chateau Thierry in France, June 29, 1918. Capt. Jesus Villamor, the first Filipino air hero of World War II. His fame in aerial combat against the Japanese won for him the Distinguished Flying Cross awarded by Gen. Douglas MacArthur.

Francisco Dagohoy, who led the longest revolt against the Spaniards in the Philippines’ long fight for independence in a battle called as the “Dagohoy Rebellion.” General Jose Paua, a Chinese general who fought alongside Gen. Vito Belarmino against the Americans during the occupation of Legaspi, Albay in 1900.

Leon Kilat, the fiery warrior who incited the uprising against the Spaniards in Cebu in April 13, 1898 in retaliation for the butchery of Visayan sailors in Manila Bay by the Spanish soldiers. The uprising came to be known as the “Bloody Holy Thursday of 1898.”

The 15 Martyrs of Bicolandia, composed of twelve patriots from the Bicol region who were executed at Bagumbayan, Manila, in January 4, 1897, and three others who died in prison or in exile. These 15 martyrs are immortalized as Bicolandia’s “Quince Martires.”

And then there were the 13 martyrs of Cavite and the 19 martyrs of Kalibo, Aklan, who were executed in September 12, 1896, together with these four other martyrs: Sancho Valenzuela, Eugenio Silvestre, Modesto Sarmiento and Ramon Peralta.

The Filipino Women Heroes
Here are four women heroes of the Philippines who fought in the battlefield against the Spaniards:

Agueda Kahabagan, the woman general of Laguna whose martial exploits earned her the nickname “Tagalog Joan of Arc.” Trinidad Tecson, the fighting nurse of Bulacan, who fought under the banner of Gregorio del Pilar.

Teresa Magbanua, commonly known as “Nay Isa”, a college-bred woman of Iloilio who became famous as the “Visayan Joan of Arc” because of her military exploits in Panay’s battlefield.

And Gabriela Silang, the “Ilocana Joan of Arc” who carried the fighting cause of her husband Diego Silang, after he was assassinated in May 28, 1763. Gabriela was later defeated and executed in Vigan, Ilocos Sur, in September 20, 1763. - AJ



Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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