By Sol Vanzi Timpla't Sikkim
Manila’s best pancit palabok   

PHOTO: The rich shrimp sauce that tops Pastora’s famous pancit palabok (Images by: NOEL B. PABALATE)Pancit, probably the most popular Filipino merienda and birthday dish, is not one but many different dishes.

There’s pancit gisado: stir-fried noodles with vegetables and meat. And then you have the complicated pancit palabok, also known as pancit luglog, also known as pancit Malabon. The rich shrimp sauce that tops Pastora's famous pancit palabok  The name pancit luglog comes from the way the bihon noodles, in a strainer, are shaken (luglog) to drain briefly after a few seconds in boiling water. Pancit palabok refers to the many ingredients (palabok) atop the noodles. Pancit Malabon, using fat rice noodles, is named after the seaside town where ingredients used are mostly seafood.

In the mid-1970s, Manila’s high society flocked to Rosie’s Pancit Malabon at the south end of the Philippine International Trade Exhibits row along Roxas Boulevard, built by Imelda Marcos for the World Bank-IMF 1976 convention held at the PICC. The exhibition huts still stand, and the original sign of Rosie’s is still there. When hankering for pancit palabok, city folk depend on the tried-and-tested restaurants like Aristocrat, whose version uses thin noodles that could be eaten with putong puti (steamed rice cakes). The young ones would rather visit Jollibee, where the pancit palabok portion is barely enough to satisfy one’s hunger, but is freshly made and has real shrimp and chicharon.

People from Quiapo and many areas in old downtown Manila, however, remain loyal to a small karinderya (food stall) inside the Quinta public market. Pastora Special Palabok has been serving what could be the best pancit palabok in the city for as long as vendors and shoppers can remember, opening daily as early as 5 a.m. and closing in the evening after selling hundreds of plates of the delicacy. The dozens of ingredients used in this pancit restaurant in Quiapo. The dozens of ingredients used in this pancit restaurant in Quiapo. What makes Pastora’s pancit palabok special? The ingredients which have remained true to the original recipe developed by Aling Pastora, the original stall owner, who left the business to her loyal workers. * READ MORE...

(ALSO) Quinta Market: From lamps to angel’s wings

MANILA, Philippines--Rivers are a very important part of a country's economic activities. Great cities lie alongside mighty rivers. Pasig River runs from the mouth of Laguna de Bay and snakes through various towns and cities until it empties out into Manila Bay. At the end of Pasig sits one of the oldest marketplaces in Manila, Quinta Market. It sits at the foot of Quezon Bridge and is not far from Quiapo Church. Here, one finds items from furnishings to clothes.

Under Quezon Bridge, popularly known as 'ilalim ng tulay,' are stalls selling Philippine-made products, from cribs, hammocks, 'banig' mats, gift boxes to capiz lamps. I started going to this place when I was in high school and the 'bayong' backpack was in vogue among us students. Quinta items come from all over, from upland Banaue to lowland Laguna. When I needed items to create my own resort-style pad, I had great finds at Quinta, including a hanging capiz chandelier and spherical capiz lamps. Visitors to my place can?t help but notice them; a friend even asked me to buy one for her spa in Dumaguete. * CONTINUE READING...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Manila’s best pancit palabok

MANILA, OCTOBER 6, 2014 (MANILA BULLETIN)  by Sol Vanzi - Share this: Pancit, probably the most popular Filipino merienda and birthday dish, is not one but many different dishes.

There’s pancit gisado: stir-fried noodles with vegetables and meat.

And then you have the complicated pancit palabok, also known as pancit luglog, also known as pancit Malabon.


The rich shrimp sauce that tops Pastora's famous pancit palabok The rich shrimp sauce that tops Pastora’s famous pancit palabok (Images by: NOEL B. PABALATE)

The name pancit luglog comes from the way the bihon noodles, in a strainer, are shaken (luglog) to drain briefly after a few seconds in boiling water.

Pancit palabok refers to the many ingredients (palabok) atop the noodles.

Pancit Malabon, using fat rice noodles, is named after the seaside town where ingredients used are mostly seafood.

In the mid-1970s, Manila’s high society flocked to Rosie’s Pancit Malabon at the south end of the Philippine International Trade Exhibits row along Roxas Boulevard, built by Imelda Marcos for the World Bank-IMF 1976 convention held at the PICC. The exhibition huts still stand, and the original sign of Rosie’s is still there.

When hankering for pancit palabok, city folk depend on the tried-and-tested restaurants like Aristocrat, whose version uses thin noodles that could be eaten with putong puti (steamed rice cakes).

The young ones would rather visit Jollibee, where the pancit palabok portion is barely enough to satisfy one’s hunger, but is freshly made and has real shrimp and chicharon.

People from Quiapo and many areas in old downtown Manila, however, remain loyal to a small karinderya (food stall) inside the Quinta public market.

Pastora Special Palabok has been serving what could be the best pancit palabok in the city for as long as vendors and shoppers can remember, opening daily as early as 5 a.m. and closing in the evening after selling hundreds of plates of the delicacy.


The dozens of ingredients used in this pancit restaurant in Quiapo.

What makes Pastora’s pancit palabok special? The ingredients which have remained true to the original recipe developed by Aling Pastora, the original stall owner, who left the business to her loyal workers.

* Here’s a list of the ingredients the cooks of Pastora’s place atop the blanched noodles: Sarsang palabok (thick shrimp-flavored sauce), chicharong bulaklak (pork intestines chitlins), chicharong balat (ground crispy pork rinds), swahe (white shrimps), tokwa (bean curd), Adobong pusit (stewed baby squid), tinapang himay (flaked smoked fish), boiled egg, calamansi, and rendered pork fat.

When Pastora’s pancit palabok is mixed by the diner, the resulting mélange is not the usual orange, but a pinkish shade of gray from the Adobong pusit ink.

Each forkful of noodles is coated with sauce that clings to every strand, sprinkled with bits of fish, peeled shrimp, flakes of tinapa, and powdery chicharong balat.

A whole piece of chicharong bulaklak sits atop the mound, to be eaten separately broken into the noodles.

The best part of this feast is the price: P35 per order, P40 if you want extra toppings. Each order weighs almost half a kilo, a huge bargain any way one looks at it.

Regular customers order several individual servings for special occasions, finding it cheaper than buying pancit sa bilao elsewhere.

Pastora special palabok is at the Quinta Public Market along Carlos Palanca Street, Quiapo. Open daily from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m.


QUINTA MQRKIET: Carlos Palanca Street, Quiapo


The Muslim Quarter of QUIAPO where the biggest mosque in Manila is located Masjid al-Dahab

EARLY REPORT FROM THE INQUIRER

Quinta Market in 2009: From lamps to angel’s wings By Jake Ramirez Philippine Daily Inquirer First Posted 23:34:00 04/14/2009 Filed Under: Lifestyle & Leisure


These native products come from various parts of the country. Items made of Capiz shells are best sellers.

MANILA, Philippines--Rivers are a very important part of a country's economic activities.

Great cities lie alongside mighty rivers. Pasig River runs from the mouth of Laguna de Bay and snakes through various towns and cities until it empties out into Manila Bay.

At the end of Pasig sits one of the oldest marketplaces in Manila, Quinta Market. It sits at the foot of Quezon Bridge and is not far from Quiapo Church.

Here, one finds items from furnishings to clothes.

Under Quezon Bridge, popularly known as 'ilalim ng tulay,' are stalls selling Philippine-made products, from cribs, hammocks, 'banig' mats, gift boxes to capiz lamps.

I started going to this place when I was in high school and the 'bayong' backpack was in vogue among us students.

Quinta items come from all over, from upland Banaue to lowland Laguna.

When I needed items to create my own resort-style pad, I had great finds at Quinta, including a hanging capiz chandelier and spherical capiz lamps.

Visitors to my place can?t help but notice them; a friend even asked me to buy one for her spa in Dumaguete.

* I also bought hampers made of water hyacinth and boxes as well, and used them to organize my undergarments.

Echague, Hidalgo


Echague Street, Quiapo

Along Echague Street fronting Quinta, stores such as La Manileña and Echague Trading are selling costumes ranging from Snow White to Cinderella, Peter Pan and new Disney characters such as Belle from 'Beauty and the Beast' and Ariel, from 'The Little Mermaid.'

Wings in various makes and materials, from white feathers for angels to colorful gauze for fairies, are also being sold.

Egyptian headdress, crowns and made-to-order items could also be ordered in case a dance troupe is in need of a dozen pairs.

For costume parties, the stores have various animal farm outfits, from a pig to a duck, down to a worm.

Echague is also home to the famous Excellente Chinese ham.


Excelente Cooked Ham

Among budding and veteran photographers, Hidalgo Street is well-known for its photography supplies, from tripods to lenses.

A pediatrician friend, who is into beadwork and fashion accessories, visits Muslim traders near Quinta Market for semi-precious stones-coral, pearls and emeralds.

For those looking for inexpensive frames for paintings and photographs, Quiapo has many frame workshops.

Now that ABS-CBN Foundation revived the movement to clean Pasig River, maybe efforts could start with reviving and modernizing Quinta Market and adjoining Muslim dwelling areas.

Quinta, a landmark from the past century, should be restored.


SOL JOSE VANZI'S CORNER
LIFESTYLE COLUMNIST OF THE MANILA DAILY BULLETIN & PANORAMA
'TIMPLA'T TIKIM'


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