Sol Vanzi Timpla't Tikim
THE RETURN OF SUNSET DINING: MALATE, MANILA BAYWALK SUNSET MARKET  

PHOTO: SUNSET AT BAYWALK --A dozen members of my immediate family were trapped in traffic on the southbound lane of Roxas Boulevard one late afternoon. We’re all headed for a sumptuous Pinoy grilled dinner. My six grandchildren were getting restless and hungry as our vehicle crawled toward the corner of Quirino Avenue. Then suddenly, the kids stopped fidgeting and all begged for the van to stop and let them off. There, on what we call Baywalk, stood what I could only describe as “The Jetsons’ barbecue smoker,” which turns slabs of beef, pork belly, tuna, and giant squid into mahogany-lacquered grilled masterpieces. Around the smoker were 30 wooden picnic tables, each large enough to be occupied by eight people. Overhead were white Japanese lanterns swaying with the breeze. The aroma wafting from the all-stainless cooking contraption was too much for our hungry stomachs. Then and there, we decided to cancel our trip to Baclaran and hold our reunion dinner at the Baywalk Sunset Market, the first eatery to open at the revived Baywalk in Malate. * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: Captains courageous: A veteran journalist reminisces on the men and women she covered, whose brave moments never cease to inspire her.

[PHNO WEBMASTER'S NOTE: THE VETERAN JOURNALIST WAS SOL JOSE-VANZI, WHO ALSO BECAME FORMER PRESIDENT FIDEL RAMOS' STAFF ASSISTANT AND WAS ALSO IMELDA MARCOS' SPOKESPERSON ---THOSE WERE THE DAYS!] Journalists, by the very nature of their job, get exposed to more unusual, often perilous, situations than the average person: erupting volcanoes, rushing floodwaters, collapsing buildings, raging fires, and armed conflicts. Their presence in the midst of danger is necessary in the fulfillment of their goal—to report the news. Every time, they will meet and talk to heroes, who rise above such dire straits and become the wall by which everyone leans on. And on very rare occasions, news reporters become the news, even emerge as heroes. MAY 1961 * CONTINUE READING...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:


SUNSET AT BAYWALK--COURTESY OF FILIPINAEXPLORER.COM

The return of Sunset Dining
Baywalk on Roxas Boulevard is back in the food scene, kicking off with a Filipino barbecue smoker resto.

A dozen members of my immediate family were trapped in traffic on the southbound lane of Roxas Boulevard one late afternoon.

We’re all headed for a sumptuous Pinoy grilled dinner. My six grandchildren were getting restless and hungry as our vehicle crawled toward the corner of Quirino Avenue.

Then suddenly, the kids stopped fidgeting and all begged for the van to stop and let them off.


SMOKIN’ HOT Clockwise from top: Inihaw na pusit, smoked pork liempo, grilled steak, and smoked fresh tuna.

Space Age Smoker

There, on what we call Baywalk, stood what I could only describe as “The Jetsons’ barbecue smoker,” which turns slabs of beef, pork belly, tuna, and giant squid into mahogany-lacquered grilled masterpieces.

Around the smoker were 30 wooden picnic tables, each large enough to be occupied by eight people. Overhead were white Japanese lanterns swaying with the breeze. The aroma wafting from the all-stainless cooking contraption was too much for our hungry stomachs.

Then and there, we decided to cancel our trip to Baclaran and hold our reunion dinner at the Baywalk Sunset Market, the first eatery to open at the revived Baywalk in Malate.

Some of the picnic tables were already occupied: foreign tourists waiting to take photos of the sunset, lovers on a date, motorcycle riders waiting out the traffic jam.

Some were drinking canned beer (P60), bottled water (P30), or canned soda (P45). Everyone was ordering simple dishes from its one-page laminated menu: T-bone steak (160), liempo (P129), smoked tuna panga (P280), and inihaw na pusit (P220).

The children in our group wanted french fries (P100), pork BBQ (P25/stick), and cheese sticks (P80).

The homesick balikbayan from our group hankered for crispy pata (P470), a large pig leg that came all chopped up, filling the serving plate to the brim. Each of us ordered plain rice.

DINE OUT From left: Experience the authentic Baywalk ambiance, go get some grilled seafood goodness, and have a family dinner date.

A Gentler Baywalk

After sunset, we were serenaded by a quartet playing OPM and new acoustic hits. Angelo Teano, who manages the family’s business, explained that loud music, karaoke, or rock bands are not allowed.

And that’s only one of the many changes in this new Baywalk. Unlike the Baywalk under former mayor Lito Atienza, which then mayor Alfredo Lim closed for legal, health, and financial issues, the new Baywalk will have no permanent structures.

Chairs and tables will also be positioned away from the seawall to allow free movement of promenaders and joggers.

Fresh And Quick

We found Baywalk Sunset Market’s service very efficient and fast, thanks to senior service staff Terry Reyes, who honed her skills for 20 years at Hobbit House.

The menu, short and sweet, offered dishes that could be grilled or deep-fried. Nothing complicated. No fusion.

The large kitchen staff works behind several folding tables that hold deep fryers, gravy pots, rice cookers, and sauce jars.

The star of the joint is the custom-made smoker-griller, parked close to Roxas Boulevard where its smoke gets blown away from diners by the prevailing winds.

Cheap Thrills

Our meal was perfect. The T-bone steak was marbled and tender, the liempo crisp and juicy, the tuna panga had no trace of fishiness, and the giant squid had thick flesh that was cooked perfectly.

The crispy pata skin was puffed and its flesh rich in flavor, reminiscent of the Ilocos bagnet.

But the best part of the dinner? The bill. It was less than half of what we would have spent in other Filipino restaurants.

Baywalk Sunset Market is open 5 p.m. to midnight, Monday to Sunday. 09276308567(Angelo Teano)

Captains courageous by Sol Vanzi


President Corazon C. Aquino, Commander-in-Chief.  Standing beside her, Chief of Staff Gen. Fidel V. Ramos. Circa 1987

A veteran journalist reminisces on the men and women she covered, whose brave moments never cease to inspire her. [PHNO WEBMASTER'S NOTE: THE VETERAN JOURNALIST WAS SOL JOSE-VANZI, WHO ALSO BECAME FVR'S ASSISTANT AND WAS ALSO IMELDA MARCOS' SPOKESPERSON ---THOSE WERE THE DAYS!]

Journalists, by the very nature of their job, get exposed to more unusual, often perilous, situations than the average person: erupting volcanoes, rushing floodwaters, collapsing buildings, raging fires, and armed conflicts.

Their presence in the midst of danger is necessary in the fulfillment of their goal—to report the news. Every time, they will meet and talk to heroes, who rise above such dire straits and become the wall by which everyone leans on.

And on very rare occasions, news reporters become the news, even emerge as heroes.

MAY 1961

* Manila Times police reporter Rod T. Reyes became a hero to thousands of parents and an inspiration to an entire generation of aspiring journalists, myself included, when he risked his life to expose and dismantle a drug syndicate in Malabon in 1961.

Immersing himself in the circle of addicts that patronized a drug den, Rod went through the hazardous rituals of taking addictive drugs himself in order to protect his cover and be accepted by the community of addicts and drug dealers. Using the information Rod gathered, authorities successfully raided the drug den and broke up the syndicate responsible for the destruction of many young lives and the breakup of families.


In March 1976, the Manila Mining Corporation tunnel caved in. Only two survived.


MARCH 1976

A Manila Mining Corporation tunnel caved in at the gold mining town of Placer, Surigao del Norte, trapping dozens of workers led by Engineer Acorda.

It took rescuers 24 days to reach the only two survivors, who narrated how Acorda led the miners in prayer and instructed them to tear up their t-shirts and eat them to fill up their bellies.

Acorda also initially led the group to relatively safer interior tunnels, and showed them how to shore up bunkheads for added protection. Acorda, sadly, perished before rescuers could drop food and water through tubes drilled 40 meters above the trapped miners.

As correspondent for ABC News New York, I covered the disaster and sat throughout the ordeal with Acorda’s pregnant wife Minda.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1986


Presidential candidate Corazon Aquino on the campaign trail. COURTESY OF YOURONEVOICECANMAKEADIFFERENCE.WORDPRESS,COM

Hundreds of foreign correspondents representing major newspapers, radio, and TV networks around the world were encamped in Manila covering Corazon Aquino, who was campaigning for president of the Philippines against strongman Ferdinand Marcos.

The David versus Goliath scenario was too newsworthy to ignore, and everyone wanted to record each and every move, speech, and handshake of the widow candidate.

It was not an even fight. Marcos had, at his disposal, all the facilities and assets of the Philippine government and the military: personnel, transport, communications equipment, and lodging.

Covering Marcos was a breeze; everything was offered on a silver platter. Following Cory around, on the other hand, was an ordeal that often became an impossible task.

Cory’s schedule involved campaign speeches in several cities and different islands in the Visayas and Mindanao. It was evident that a single reporter or photographer could not cover all her stops unless each media outfit chartered its own plane.

My company, Stringer, Inc., was then representing 17 international newspapers and TV news organizations.

They all had staff in Manila covering Cory. I tried to charter medium-sized planes to ferry my clients desperate to follow Cory’s campaign, but everyone I talked to turned me down, concerned about the backlash from the authoritarian government.

Everyone, that is, except Pacific Air, then managed by Rudy Isidro.

Rudy understood the foreign correspondents’ predicament and agreed to let me charter three fixed wing aircraft per campaign day. The foreign correspondents chipped in for the charter, allowing a generous commission, or tip, for my company. And the rest is history.

The journalists were then able to cover all of Cory’s provincial campaign sorties. They wrote stories and produced TV reports which were read and viewed by millions around the world, including influential world leaders.

All thanks to an airline executive who braved it all in the name of democracy.


Corazon Aquino, the Philippines A self-proclaimed “plain housewife,” Corazon Aquino led the Philippines’ 1986 “people power” revolution, toppling autocrat Ferdinand Marcos after 20 years of rule. Aquino’s journey from Senator’s wife to President of the Philippines began with the 1983 assassination of her husband Benigno Aquino Jr., who had returned from exile in the U.S. to run against Marcos. When the autocrat called a snap election, Corazon took up her husband’s cause. Though Marcos claimed electoral victory, Aquino led a peaceful revolution across the nation of impoverished islands. Emotional supporters came out in droves during a two-week standoff, and eventually, the military reversed course and supported her. Aquino became President upon Marcos’ resignation. Despite coup attempts and corruption charges, she took significant strides toward democracy, including ratifying a constitution that limits the power of the presidency. Long after stepping down in 1992, Aquino continued to advocate against policies she felt threatened the country’s democratic ideals. Though she died in 2009, Aquino remains a symbol of the power of peaceful popular movements. —Zoe Fox -TIME MAGAZINE


SOL JOSE VANZI'S CORNER
LIFESTYLE COLUMNIST OF THE MANILA DAILY BULLETIN & PANORAMA
'TIMPLA'T TIKIM'


Sol's profile avatar at Manila Bulletin
Lifestyle/Food

http://www.mb.com.ph/author/sol-vanzi/
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1997 Photo: EDITOR -Philippine Headline News Online (PHNO) http://www.newsflash.org/staff/solvanzi.htm


2005 Photo: PHNO Travel & Leisure
http://www.newsflash.org/tlframe.htm


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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