SOL JOSE VANZI: ROSEMARY BABY

In traditional Filipino homes, rosemary (called romero or domero in many regions) is classified
as a medicinal herb, even though it is not sold in drugstores but at the dried herbs aisles of
supermarkets. Rosemary has been a part of my life since childhood. Rosemary tea washed off the acne from my teenage face, rinsed my gugo-lathered long hair, and soothed my nerves while cramming for college final exams. I bought fresh rosemary for P5 per bunch at Plaza Miranda, in front of the Quiapo Church, where herbs continue to be peddled alongside amulets, dried sea horses, fertility potions, and spell-breaking talismans.
HARD TO FIND I tried for many years to order a rosemary plant, but the vendors merely suggested planting mature fresh stems and hope they take root. * READ MORE...

ALSO: 4 reasons the best BBQ is in Guam

Sacrilege, we know. But the best BBQ in the world could be in Guam. How to know? Fly off to
Pleasure Island in Tumon, Guam this July to experience the annual BBQ block party. The barbequing process begins one day before the actual grilling. Day One! The meat is marinated in a combination of soy sauce, vinegar, salt, black pepper, onions, and garlic, and some super secret ingredients, which vary depending on whom you ask. 2. The best BBQ is grilled using tangan-tangan wood, found throughout the country. This provides the meat with a unique smoky, unforgettable flavor. 3. Forget your average chicken and beef. In Guam, the BBQ plate also includes beef steak, short ribs, brisket, pork belly, and turkey tails, plus macaroni salad on the side. Some throw in big, fat, briny fresh oysters, too. 4. There’s an art behind the barbecuing: Charcoal or gas-powered store-bought grills are used for convenience, but the island favorite is probably the 55-gallon metal drum (tanke), either standing or cut lengthwise. A favorite fuel is the ever present tangantangan (Leucaena glauca) but some barbecuers take the extra effort to find slower burning woods like gago (Polynesian ironwood, Casuarina equisetifolia) or ahgao (false elder, Premna gaudichaudii). THIS IS THE FULL REPORT

ALSO: ABOUT GUAM

PHOTO Chamorro Sunset  --The native food of Guam is largely based on what early ancestors could gather, grow and hunt from the land, plus what they could catch and harvest from the ocean. The Tree of Life, the coconut, offered much in the way of copra, oil, coconut water and coconut milk, as did many other fruit and vegetables. Fish and other seafood, and edible seaweed were bountiful, and later, colonial and occupational times allowed for more crops, better farming methods and a consistent harvest from Guam's lush volcanic soils. Following the end of World War II, Guam was inundated with foods from the U.S. mainland, notably canned processed foods which islanders embraced for their flavor and ease of preparation. Since then, Guam as the hub of the Pacific has also become a food capital, blending regional tastes, with dozens of cuisines to reflect the melting pot of its people. Today, Guam is a leader in Pacific Rim cuisine and is at the forefront of the culinary revolution that embraced the world in the mid-90s. Its many talented cooks and chefs constantly push the standards of flavors and presentations, and it is easy to find a world-class meal on Guam. Guam, the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands chain, has a unique and complex cultural history. Located in the Western Pacific in the geographic region known as Micronesia, Guam is well known for its strategic military and economic position between Asia and the North American continent, but is less known for its remarkable history and resilient people.*  READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Rosemary baby

MANILA, JUNE 30, 2014
(BULLETIN) by Sol Vanzi - In traditional Filipino homes, rosemary (called romero or domero in many regions) is classified as a medicinal herb, even though it is not sold in drugstores but at the dried herbs aisles of supermarkets.

Rosemary has been a part of my life since childhood.

Rosemary tea washed off the acne from my teenage face, rinsed my gugo-lathered long hair, and soothed my nerves while cramming for college final exams.

I bought fresh rosemary for P5 per bunch at Plaza Miranda, in front of the Quiapo Church, where herbs continue to be peddled alongside amulets, dried sea horses, fertility potions, and spell-breaking talismans.


rosemary

HARD TO FIND

I tried for many years to order a rosemary plant, but the vendors merely suggested planting mature fresh stems and hope they take root.

* Mint (yerba buena), galangal (langkawas), and basil (sulasi) grew in pots around my hole-in-the-wall boutique in Malate. But not rosemary, which by the 1960s I had learned to cherish as a vital ingredient in bread, lamb, chicken, and pork roasts.

For years and years, I stopped at every highway garden, visited botanical shows, and asked around Cartimar plant stores. No leads. I even tried to smuggle a small potted rosemary plant from Sydney in 1991, only to have it confiscated by airport quarantine officers.

EUREKA!

Finally, last Saturday afternoon, I saw a large pot of profusely growing rosemary for sale in the middle of the metropolis, at the enchanting open-air Greenfield Weekend Market in Mandaluyong.

The beginnings of a rosemary bush, it was at least a year old, with eight main trunks and dozens of sturdy stems reaching up to the sunlight. It now sits on my window sill, bathing in six hours of daily morning sun.

ROSEMARY BREAD


Focaccia (Italian pronunciation: [foˈkattʃa]) is a flat oven-baked Italian bread product similar in style and texture to pizza doughs. It may be topped with herbs or other ingredients. Focaccia is popular in Italy and is usually seasoned with olive oil and salt, and sometimes herbs, and may be topped with onion, cheese and meat, or flavored with a number of vegetables. Focaccia can be used as a side to many meals, as a base for pizza, or as sandwich bread. WIKIPEDIA

I now have fresh rosemary for baking whole wheat loaves and Italian flat bread called Focaccia.

As a shortcut, I spread olive oil, flavored with garlic and rosemary on supermarket-bought plain pizza crust or shawarma flat bread, and sprinkle coarse sea salt on it before serving.

GRILLED CHICKEN

Mix salt, pepper, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, and rosemary. Rub the mixture all over the chicken pieces and marinate for at least an hour. Grill, broil, or bake at medium temperature until done. Baste with beer a few times. Cook until juices run clear.

For whole chicken, apply the herb mixture inside and out, and stuff the cavity with a few whole stems of rosemary, one onion cut in half, and a quarter cup of beer. Close the cavity with skewers, and bake or roast on a rack until done.

CRUSTED PORK LAMB

Pierce lamb racks or standing pork chop rack all over to absorb marinade. Rub all over with salt, minced garlic, pepper, and rosemary. Refrigerate for a few hours or overnight.

Dry the meat with paper towels. Make a thick paste of coarse sea salt, flour, egg whites, garlic, and rosemary. Apply the paste thickly all over the meat to keep it flavored and moist. Using a meat thermometer, roast it until the internal temperature reaches the recommended stage.

FROM MANILA BULLETIN TRAVEL & FOOD
http://www.mb.com.ph/category/lifestyle/food-and-travel/

4 reasons the best BBQ is in Guam June 26, 2014

best BBQ in Guam

Sacrilege, we know. But the best BBQ in the world could be in Guam. How to know?

Fly off to Pleasure Island in Tumon, Guam this July to experience the annual BBQ block party.

The barbequing process begins one day before the actual grilling.

Day One! The meat is marinated in a combination of soy sauce, vinegar, salt, black pepper, onions, and garlic, and some super secret ingredients, which vary depending on whom you ask.

2. The best BBQ is grilled using tangan-tangan wood, found throughout the country. This provides the meat with a unique smoky, unforgettable flavor.

3. Forget your average chicken and beef. In Guam, the BBQ plate also includes beef steak, short ribs, brisket, pork belly, and turkey tails, plus macaroni salad on the side. Some throw in big, fat, briny fresh oysters, too.

4. There’s an art behind the barbecuing:
Charcoal or gas-powered store-bought grills are used for convenience, but the island favorite is probably the 55-gallon metal drum (tanke), either standing or cut lengthwise.

A favorite fuel is the ever present tangantangan (Leucaena glauca) but some barbecuers take the extra effort to find slower burning woods like gago (Polynesian ironwood, Casuarina equisetifolia) or ahgao (false elder, Premna gaudichaudii).

Visitguam.ph

ABOUT GUAM


GUAM BARBECUE DISH

Food

The native food of Guam is largely based on what early ancestors could gather, grow and hunt from the land, plus what they could catch and harvest from the ocean.

The Tree of Life, the coconut, offered much in the way of copra, oil, coconut water and coconut milk, as did many other fruit and vegetables.

Fish and other seafood, and edible seaweed were bountiful, and later, colonial and occupational times allowed for more crops, better farming methods and a consistent harvest from Guam's lush volcanic soils.

Following the end of World War II, Guam was inundated with foods from the U.S. mainland, notably canned processed foods which islanders embraced for their flavor and ease of preparation.

Since then, Guam as the hub of the Pacific has also become a food capital, blending regional tastes, with dozens of cuisines to reflect the melting pot of its people.

Today, Guam is a leader in Pacific Rim cuisine and is at the forefront of the culinary revolution that embraced the world in the mid-90s.

Its many talented cooks and chefs constantly push the standards of flavors and presentations, and it is easy to find a world-class meal on Guam.

History


Chamorro Sunset

Guam, the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands chain, has a unique and complex cultural history. Located in the Western Pacific in the geographic region known as Micronesia, Guam is well known for its strategic military and economic position between Asia and the North American continent, but is less known for its remarkable history and resilient people.

* Inhabited for thousands of years archaeological evidence indicates that the Marianas Islands were one of the first places to be settled by seafaring peoples, possibly from Island Southeast Asia, over 4000 years ago. The Mariana Islands appear to have been continuously occupied by people who shared the same culture and language that eventually became known as Chamorro.

Guam’s history is also one of multi-colonialism, with the last 400 years of Guam’s history marked by administrations of three different colonial powers: Spain, the United States and Japan.

The ceding of Guam to the United States as an unincorporated territory after the Spanish-American War in 1898 introduced Chamorros to democratic principles of government and the modern American lifestyle, while keeping them subjects of a sometimes oppressive US Naval administration.

Guam also had a unique position in World War II, when Japan invaded the island shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. For the next three years, Guam was the only US territory occupied by Japanese forces until the Americans returned in 1944 to reclaim the island.

The political maneuverings after World War II and the post war buildup led to even more expansion of US military interests in Guam and the rest of Micronesia, with Guam becoming a hub for economic and commercial development. The easing of military restrictions for entering Guam and the establishment of a local, civilian government, have made the island an ideal place for people from all over the world to visit, go to school, find jobs or pursue a variety of economic interests. Today, Guam has a diverse population that enjoys a rich, multicultural, modern and urban lifestyle, yet continues to carry the indigenous spirit, language and culture of its people.

Legends


The Banyan " Taotaomona " Tree

Taotaomona:

Taotaomo'na, literally the people of before, refers to ancestral spirits that inhabited the earth along with the living. Ancient Chamorros believed the world around them was full of spirits who provided both daily protection and assistance in their tasks, but also created dangers and problems.

The connection between Chamorros and these spirits has changed over time, primarily due to cultural changes that came about from Spanish colonization and Christianization. Slowly over time, these spirits have changed from the ante of ancestors to the wily ghosts, devils and demons that play tricks or cause harm today. Taotaomo'na can be defined in different ways, depending on their relationships with the living.

Taotaomo'na is therefore a term which could refer in general to all the spirits of Chamorro ancestors, to all of those who have come before.

These spirits played a huge role in the daily life of Chamorros offering assistance and protection with all sorts of daily tasks. These spirits were treated as members of the family and were referred to be name or through terms of endearment.

Santa Marian Kamalen:

Santa Marian Kamalen, also known as Our Lady of Camarin, is the patron saint of Guam. The 300-year-old Santa Marian Kamalen statue is a revered icon, and its unknown origins are explained through legend.

The actual statue of Santa Marian Kamalen is 28 3/4 inches tall and weighs 48 1/2 pounds. It is made of wood, except for the ivory face and folded hands. She is painted with a pink and blue gown and sits high at the Dulce Nombre de Maria Cathedral-Basilica in Hagåtña in a niche behind the altar.

Guamanians celebrate Feast of the Immaculate Conception each Dec. 8, Catholics turn out by the thousands in Hagåtna to honor her in a procession around the island's capital.

She is one of the most important icons in Guam's history, religious or otherwise.

There are multiple versions of the legends that explain her origin:

According to one version of the legend, a fisherman from Merizo went fishing, and spotted a statue of the Virgin Mary on the ocean floor. He swam underwater to try to approach the statue, but to his surprise it moved away. No matter what he did, he could not close the distance between the statue and himself.

He returned to shore and sought advice from the village priest. The priest told the fisherman to dress in his Sunday clothes and try again. He did so, and this time had no trouble in getting the statue.

Another version of the legend has it that the fisherman saw the statue floating in the water, escorted by two gold-spotted crabs, each bearing a lighted candle between its claws. She thus also became known as the Lady of the Crabs.

When the fisherman returned, he took the statue to the Presidio, or main barracks which was still under construction. There the statue was relegated to a tool shed, in Spanish camarin and in Chamorro kamalen. Thus, she became known as Santa Maria del Camarin in Spanish, or Santa Marian Kamalen in Chamorro. She was also known as the Lady of the Barracks.

Puntan Dos Amantes:

The story tells of two Chamorros who loved each other but their love was unacceptable because he was a high caste man (matao) and she a lower caste woman (manachang). Mataos were strictly forbidden from allying themselves with those from the lower caste.

A certain matao of the village of Gnaton fell in love with a young and pretty manachang girl and fled with her. He found no asylum among another native group, however, as he refused to part with her.

Pursued by his relatives, the young lovers wandered for some time in the most inaccessible wood and rocky areas; but so precarious and wretched an existence reduced them to despair. Determined to put an end to it, they built a tomb of stones and place in it the infant that was the sad fruit of their love.

Then, lost and distracted, they climbed to the very summit of a high, steep-sided peak beside the sea. Binding themselves together by the hair, and clasping one another, they cast themselves from that peak into the waves below.

The cape was named by the Spanish, Cabo de los Amantes (Lovers' Cape), now known as Puntan Dos Amantes (Two Lover's Point).

But since the story changed to include a Spanish figure. It goes as follows:

Once, long ago, during a time when Spain claimed the Mariana Islands, there was a family who lived in Hagåtña, the capital city of Guahan. The father was a wealthy Spanish businessman and the mother, a daughter of a great maga'låhi or Chamorro chief.

Their oldest daughter was a beautiful young woman, admired by all for her honesty, modesty, and natural charm. One day, against her will, the girl's father arranged for her to take a powerful Spanish captain as her husband.

But the girl met and fell in love with a common Chamorro man, and they promised each other their love.

When the girl's father learned of the couple, he grew angry and demanded that she marry the Spanish captain at once - but she found her lover and escaped.

Her father, the captain and all the Spanish soldiers pursued the lovers up to the high cliff above (Tumon) Bay. The lovers found themselves trapped between the edge of the cliff and the approaching soldiers.

The lovers tied their long black hair together and kissed for the last time before leaping to their deaths. They were never seen again.

Today the place where they jumped is known as Puntan dos Amåntes or Two Lover's Point. The site has been restored and modernized, and visitors still visit there to learn about the two lovers, and enjoy one of the most breathtaking aerial sites of Guam's coastline.

The Chamorro Culture

In addition to its inviting beaches, elegant hotels, and great bargains, Guam has another vital attraction- its unique culture. The traditions and customs of Guam's proud island heritage thrive, despite invading conquerors, wars and epidemics, and changing governments. Forged from a neolithic foundation and molded by historical events, Guam's living culture has expanded into a vibrant, modern way of life.

Since the 17th century, Catholic churches have been the center of village activities. Even today, every village has its patron saint whose feast day is celebrated with an elaborate fiesta, which the entire island is invited to attend. Family groups still hold christening parties, fandangos (weddings, novenas, funerals, and death- anniversary rosaries). All are flavored by the rich Spanish heritage.

Spanish influence may also be seen in the mestiza, a style of women's clothing, or, in the architecture of Guam's southern villages.

Countless Americans, Europeans, Asians, Micronesians, and other visitors have left their imprints on the island's pastimes and tastes, but nowhere is the island's multi-cultural influence more evident than in its food.

At a fiesta or other island party, families prepare heavily laden tables of local delicacies, such as red rice, shrimp patties, a Filipino style noodle dish called pancit, barbecued ribs and chicken, and taro leaves cooked in coconut milk. Another mouth-watering treat is kelaguen, usually prepared from chopped broiled chicken, lemon juice, grated coconut, and hot peppers. Fiery finadene sauce, made with soy sauce, lemon juice or vinegar, hot peppers, and onions, is sprinkled over the food for a truly memorable dish. After a hearty meal, Chamorros often enjoy chewing pugua (betel nut), mixed with powdered lime and wrapped in pepper leaf.

Music is an integral aspect of an island lifestyle, and performances using traditional instruments, such as the belembaotuyan, are highlights of cultural presentations. The belembaotuyan, made from a hollow gourd and strung with a taut wire and pressed against ones bare stomach, creates a melodic sound enjoyed by all. The nose flute, once a long forgotten instrument, is now making a hearty return.

The Kantan Chamorro style of singing has been a favorite form of entertainment for generations. Additionally, it has been used to lighten long hours of group work activity, such as weaving, corn husking, and net fishing. One singer would begin the familiar four-line chant, referring romantically or teasingly in the verse to another person in the group. The challenged person would then take up the tune and the song might continue in this fashion with different singers for hours.

Contemporary music is an important element of social gatherings, ranging from fiestas and fandangos to casual backyard parties. Musicians usually sing Chamorro, American, Filipino, or a variety of Asian songs.

Legends and folklore about village taotaomo'na (ancient spirits), doomed lovers leaping to their death off Two Lovers' Point (Puntan Dos Amantes), and Sirena, a beautiful young girl who became a mermaid, are portrayed in many of Guam's enriching cultural dances.

Guam's traditional arts are very much alive. During cultural fairs and exhibitions, visitors often have the opportunity to watch master weavers, carvers and even a blacksmith at work.

Weavers, using the traditional pandanus or coconut fibers, fashion baskets of various sizes, purses, hats, floor mats, and wall hangings. Carvers hew tables, plaques, figurines of people or animals, and household implements using ifil wood, or pago woods.

The traditional ways are being passed along to the younger generations through apprenticeship programs in order to preserve the island's art heritage. A master blacksmith, for example, recently graduated three pupil,who have learned how to make useful steel farming and fishing implements, such as coconut graters, hoes, machetes, and fishing spearheads. Other hand-forged items include betel nut scissors, tools for weaving, and knives.

The People

A trip to Guam is like visiting the four exotic corners of the globe.

Guam is considered the hub of the western Pacific and undeniably Micronesia's most cosmopolitan destination - a true example of the great American melting pot. In addition to the indigenous Chamorros and 'stateside' Americans, Guam boasts large populations of Filipinos, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Micronesian Islanders, as well as a few Vietnamese, Indians, and Europeans.

As the 1990 census figures indicate, the ethnic composition of the island is 43 percent Chamorro, 23 percent Fllipino, 15 percent other ethnic groups, 14 percent Caucasian, and 5 percent other Pacific Islanders. Approximately half of all Guam residents were born on Guam, and 70 percent of these are under the age of 34.

Population

Our island has been enjoying a steady population growth. The 1990 census reports a population of 133,152, a 20.4 percent increase since 1980. Population estimates for 2009 indicate Guam has grown to 177,000 people.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE