GABI NG NG MUSIKA
UP-LOS BAÑOS: TEACHERS, STUDENTS OFFER SOLIDARITY, CULTURAL EVENTS
FOR BELEAGUERED QUEZON RESIDENTS / VOW TO STOP ENVIRONMENTAL RAPE

UPLB teachers, students vow to stop rights abuses, environmental rape in Quezon

Reference Person: Liberty Notarte
Faculty Coordinator - 09267093720

18 July 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

[PHOTO- BONDOC PENINSULA FARMER; COURTESY OF GOOGLE IMAGES]

LOS BAÑOS, LAGUNA— UP Los Baños faculty members, students and local artists gathered here tonight to ink their commitment to stop human rights abuses and imminent large-scale mineral exploration in South Quezon and Bondoc Peninsula.

In a joint undertaking signed during the benefit gig organized by the Save Bondoc Peninsula Movement (SBPM), the participants vowed to “take necessary actions to bring to justice human rights violators and oppose, through collective action, the impending environmental destruction that will be caused by the entry of mining and other extractive industries” in the said areas.

The group also said it will “continue to conduct educational activities and mass actions against government policies that further rights abuses, such as the counterinsurgency program Oplan Bayanihan, and environmental destruction, such as the Mining Act of 1995 and the recently issued Executive Order 79.”

According to the SBPM, an unprecedented eight battalions of military, police and paramilitary elements are currently deployed in the Southern part of Quezon province under the government’s counterinsurgency program, coinciding with reports from residents of human right abuses.

Karapatan Southern Tagalog, an independent rights group, has documented at least 128 cases of human rights violations, including harassment, torture, divestment of property and enforced disappearance, allegedly committed by
government security forces since 2011.

“Military and paramilitary troops are deployed in mineral-rich areas to serve as
Investment Defence Forces designed to quell people’s resistance and to create an atmosphere conducive to mineral exploration by foreign and local mining corporations,” Liberty Notarte, UPLB faculty coordinator for the SBPM, said.

She added that since 2000, approximately 245,000 ha in Quezon are under mining application, representing about 21 percent of the total land area of the province.

“We are inspired by the apparent success of the No to Mining in Palawan Movement, and hope that through the growing support of individual and groups, we will be able to do the same in the case of South Quezon and Bondoc Peninsula,” she said.

The SBPM has already conducted a mercy mission in San Andres and Lopez in Quezon last June 25 to July 2 and a candle lighting and ecumenical activity in UPLB last July 27. It has also launched during the benefit gig its one million paper cranes for peace drive, which will run
until the celebration of the International Human Rights Day on December 8, 2012.#

THE 'GABI NG MUSIKA' EVENT

       UPLB teachers, students offer solidarity, cultural performances for beleaguered
     Quezon Residents     

        Reference Person: Liberty Notarte    Media Liaison: John Axl Palisoc

            Faculty Coordinator                         Volunteer

            09267093720                                  09267177271


            17 July 2012 

 

            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

What:
Kubing: Gabi ng Musika, Tula at Galaw para sa Kapayapaan at Pagtatanggol sa Kalikasan
[
A benefit gig/Cultural night for the residents of South Quezon and Bondoc Peninsula]

 

           Launching of Piso for Peace: One Million Peace Crane Campaign!

 

When:
18 July 2012, Wednesday, 8 p.m.

 

Where:
Music Hub, LB Square, Grove, Los Baños, Laguna

 

Who:
Various local bands, organizations, university professors, and students from UPLB

 

PHOTO AND VIDEO OPPORTUNITIES: 

Pictures of attendees making paper cranes with solidarity messages for the people of Quezon Province 

Performances and interviews

Media Coverage Highly Requested

EMAIL: Christian Ray Buendia (christianraybuendia03@gmail.com)

RELATED: BLOG WATCH AT PHNO- SOURCE: http://www.marmet-meteorites.com/

A BONDOC PENINSULA STORY

This is the incredible story of the recovery of the Bondoc meteorite. One of the largest, finest and most unusual stony meteorites yet discovered came from the Bondoc peninsula of Luzon in the Philippine Islands only because of coincidental events and the persistance of Dr. H. H. Nininger and Mr. John Lednicky, two ingenious Americans.

From: H. H. Nininger, Find a Falling Star, p. 225ff (summarized and abridged):

We had been in the Philippines ten or twelve days in 1959 when I visited the office of the National Bureau of Mines, sure that among thousands of samples that inevitably reach such an office, there must be an occasional meteorite.

"Well, yes, once in a while such a sample comes in; but who cares about meteorites?" I had the answer.

Might not the Bureau have such specimens on hand? Well, the director thought, there should be one. It had come in not so long ago, a rounded, rusty lump of what appeared to be nickel-iron, very badly weathered. The official assured me the Bureau had no interest in the specimen and that I was free to pursue the matter.

A pair of lawyers had contacted two Japanese geologists who desired an iron mine, but when these two were escorted to inspect the prospect they were disappointed: This was no iron outcorp, but only something that had fallen from the heavens, and they turned away.

To reach that remote jungle location they had to spend several hours aboard a slow train, then they waited for a bus that only runs when the weather and the roads are not too bad. It normally takes one day to reach a costal village.

From there a small boat carried them to and into the mouth of a river. Then they had tramped for ten hours through crocodile and serpent-infested jungle only to find a lone metallic lump which they judged to be of low-grade quality.

Ten years earlier a visitor from Manila to our museum on Highway 66 had shown keen interest in meteorites.

He was John A. Lednicky, a University of Kansas graduate who had lived in Manila most of his life. He said that if and when I needed assistance he would be glad to help. I decided to write to John Ladnicky to request the help he had offered.

On September 15, 1959, Lednicky wrote, that he must wait until after the national elections because bandits were operating on the peninsula; there had been considerable shooting.

But after the election there followed more rains, more typhoons; then an illness kept Lednicky in the hospital for some time. On February 13, 1961 Lednicky wrote that he visited the site and that he thinks it‘s not a meteorite.

But I was sure it was a meteorite and I wanted it more than ever. On January 9, 1962 Lednicky reported that they had been able to load the meteorite on a wooden sled, but that three carabaos (water buffalos) had been unable to move it.

With a larger bulldozer they finally managed to move the meteorite to the mouth of a river. Now a raft was being built on which the meteorite was towed to Manila.

John Lednicky put three and a half years of effort and frustration into the "favor" he had offered in late 1958. Without him the Bondoc meteorite never would have been recovered.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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