BELOVED PASTOR: CANCER CLAIMS LIFE OF JESUIT FR. WILLIAM ADDLEY

TORONTO, ON, CANADA, JANUARY 31, 2012 - This page is culled by Internet journalist Lee Quesada specially for the Philippine Headline News Online.

(CATHOLIC REGISTER) January 28, 2012- Sr. Anne Purcell, Jesuit Father Jack Costello, Jesuit Superior Father Jim Webb and Jesuit Father Peter Bisson were at Addley's hospital bed when he died. They sang a Salve Regina and prayed the prayers woven into any Catholic life — Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory Be.

As news spread the next morning there were tears and quiet commiseration in every corner of Our Lady of Lourdes. Charged with proclaiming the second reading, one parishioner got as far as the lectern before she had to turn back in tears — yielding the podium to Jesuit Father Bert Foliot.

Homilist Fr. John Parry resolutely preached on the Gospel, but turned to the passing of his friend at the end.

"He didn't have a chance to say goodbye," said Parry. "That's part of the sadness of this whole thing."

Parry noted how in the early 1990s Addley tackled the investigation of sexual abuse committed by Fr. George Epoch at Cape Croker, Manitoulin Island, in the 1970s. It was the only time Parry could recall that Fr. Addley was not encouraging, welcoming and accepting.

"His heart was broken," said Parry.

Fr. Addley was a Jesuit 48 of his 69 years. Born in Halifax in 1943, he entered the novitiate in Guelph, Ont., in 1964, just after graduating with a B.A. from Saint Mary's University in Halifax.

He took a Master's from Chicago's Loyola University in sociology in 1971 and studied theology at Toronto's Regis College. He was ordained in 1974.

On ordination he was almost immediately a leader among the Jesuits, appointed socius or principal assistant to the provincial superior in 1975. He became provincial superior in 1984.

After a decade and a half of administrative duties he was assigned to be superior of the Pickering Jesuit community, where the Jesuits care for their elderly.

In 1999 his gifts as a homilist and a leader were put to use running one of Canada's busiest and most diverse parishes. He was also a wise and respected elder on the archdiocese of Toronto's priests council, a valued board member for Regis College and the Jesuit Communication Project.

It was not uncommon to see Lourdes parishioners with notebooks and pens in hand during Fr. Addley's meticulously crafted sermons. He often closed with the encouragement that we should all "individually and collectively, corporately and personally make this world a little bit more divine and a little bit more human."

There will be a wake at Our Lady of Lourdes Jan. 26 and 27, 2-4 p.m. and 7-10 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will follow on Jan. 28 at 9:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes.

FROM `JOURNEY OF A BISHOP` BLOG
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Archbishop Terry
Gender: Male
Industry Religion
Occupation Archbishop
Location Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

FATHER BILL ADDLEY, S.J.

October 16, 1943 - January 21, 2012 R.I.P.

OTTAWA, JANUARY 22, 2012 - Yesterday morning, I received the sad news that Father William Addley had died in St. Michael's Hospital after surgery for abdominal cancer that had been diagnosed shortly after Christmas. He was just about to complete this summer a 13-year stint as Pastor of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in downtown Toronto.

"Father Bill" as he was universally known had been assistant to the the Jesuit Provincial, then from 1984-1990 Provincial of the Jesuits in English Canada Province (at that time known as the Upper Canada Jesuit Province). He was very much appreciated by so many of his Jesuit confreres for whom he showed great esteem and support, often in hidden ways and preferably with himself out of the limelight.

A proud Haligonian, he probably knew that it would take some adjusting on my part--as someone who had "come from away"--when I went to the Atlantic School of Theology in his home town to teach in 1975. So, he called me on the telephone from time to time, to ask how I was doing and to give me news of the brethren in Toronto and elsewhere across Canada, to ask advice and to offer some in my role as an interviewer for aspiring candidates to the Society.

We became friends through those calls and later when I had moved to Toronto as we went looking for housing for the Regis College Jesuits in the area around the University of Toronto. His sudden departure from our midst is hard to fathom: How mysterious God's judgments; how inscrutable his ways.

May the Lord grant this servant of his a merciful judgment and lead him to the waters of eternal life in God's Kingdom that he strove to serve. He will be missed.

Rest in peace, my brother Bill.

FROM THE BLOG OF THE ARCHDIOCESE OF TORONTO

Prayers For A Pastor Called Home

Our family of faith is mourning the loss this week of Father Bill Addley, pastor of Our Lady of Lourdes parish in Toronto. It's not often we have the passing of one our clergy in the midst of their ministry and in Fr. Bill's case, a mere two weeks after his cancer diagnosis.

To learn more about a man who shared his gifts and talents with the community for so many years, see the Catholic Register article by Michael Swan below.

Visitation will take place at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, Thursday and Friday 2-4 p.m., 7-10 p.m. on both days with a funeral Mass on Saturday at 9:30 a.m at the parish.

Our sympathies to all those who mourn his loss. May he rest in peace!

Cancer claims the life of Father Bill Addley, sj

TORONTO - The parish of Our Lady of Lourdes faced the harshest command its faith can impose at the recent Sunday morning Masses. The Catholics of this diverse, downtown parish obeyed the biblical injunction to celebrate — all the while knowing that their leader, friend and pastor had died. Jesuit Father Bill Addley died at St. Michael's Hospital just before 2 a.m. Jan. 21, surrounded by friends.

The pastor of Our Lady of Lourdes for almost 13 years, a former provincial superior of the Jesuits in English Canada and one of the first Canadian Church leaders to face the sexual abuse scandal head-on, Fr. Addley died of complications from colon cancer within two weeks of being diagnosed. He went through an operation to resection his colon Jan. 13 and for a time seemed likely to recover. But the cancer had spread and he couldn't regain his energy.

Sr. Anne Purcell, Jesuit Father Jack Costello, Jesuit Superior Father Jim Webb and Jesuit Father Peter Bisson were at Addley's hospital bed when he died. They sang a Salve Regina and prayed the prayers woven into any Catholic life — Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory Be.

As news spread the next morning there were tears and quiet commiseration in every corner of Our Lady of Lourdes. Charged with proclaiming the second reading, one parishioner got as far as the lectern before she had to turn back in tears — yielding the podium to Jesuit Father Bert Foliot.

Homilist Fr. John Parry resolutely preached on the Gospel, but turned to the passing of his friend at the end."He didn't have a chance to say goodbye," said Parry. "That's part of the sadness of this whole thing."Parry noted how in the early 1990s Addley tackled the investigation of sexual abuse committed by Fr. George Epoch at Cape Croker, Manitoulin Island, in the 1970s. It was the only time Parry could recall that Fr. Addley was not encouraging, welcoming and accepting. "His heart was broken," said Parry.

Fr. Addley was a Jesuit 48 of his 69 years. Born in Halifax in 1943, he entered the novitiate in Guelph, Ont., in 1964, just after graduating with a B.A. from Saint Mary's University in Halifax.He took a Master's from Chicago's Loyola University in sociology in 1971 and studied theology at Toronto's Regis College. He was ordained in 1974.

On ordination he was almost immediately a leader among the Jesuits, appointed socius or principal assistant to the provincial superior in 1975. He became provincial superior in 1984.After a decade and a half of administrative duties he was assigned to be superior of the Pickering Jesuit community, where the Jesuits care for their elderly.

In 1999 his gifts as a homilist and a leader were put to use running one of Canada's busiest and most diverse parishes. He was also a wise and respected elder on the archdiocese of Toronto's priests council, a valued board member for Regis College and the Jesuit Communication Project.

It was not uncommon to see Lourdes parishioners with notebooks and pens in hand during Fr. Addley's meticulously crafted sermons. He often closed with the encouragement that we should all "individually and collectively, corporately and personally make this world a little bit more divine and a little bit more human."

There will be a wake at Our Lady of Lourdes Jan. 26 and 27, 2-4 p.m. and 7-10 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will follow on Jan. 28 at 9:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes. Posted by Neil MacCarthy at 5:11 PM

FROM CATHOLIC REGISTER

TORONTO PARISHIONERS SEEM TO ACCEPT NEW MISSAL COMMENTS Written by Michael Swan, The Catholic Register Wednesday, 30 November 2011 12:10

PHOTO - Our Lady of Lourdes pastor Fr. Bill Addley began the first Sunday of Advent Mass by blessing and receiving the new Sacramentary - Michael Swan

Toronto- Canadians began using the new translation of the Roman Missal on November 27th.

Archbishop Thomas Collins believes the new translation is an opportunity for everybody in Toronto to get a little closer to the liturgy. -

Toronto’s first run at the new Sacramentary hit a few rough spots but didn’t upset many parishioners.

“I didn’t notice a lot of difference. It was more what the priest says, I think,” noted Our Lady of Lourdes parishioner Peter Maigher at the end of the 11:30 a.m. Sunday Mass. Maigher’s reaction was typical of what churchgoers told The Catholic Register at Nov. 26-27 Masses.

Lourdes pastor Fr. Bill Addley began the first Sunday of Advent Mass by blessing and receiving the new Sacramentary and assuring his parishioners that the prayers in the new translation of the Roman Missal are deeply connected to Catholic tradition and Christian history.

There has been a book called the Roman Missal since at least 1570, and some of the prayers in the book date back to the fourth century, Addley told the packed Our Lady of Lourdes downtown church (photo at right)

But months of preparation didn’t stop the Lourdes choir from singing the Memorial Acclamation they know best: “Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.”

Because it is not addressed to Christ, this memorial acclamation did not make it into the new English version of the Mass.

At St. Brigid’s parish, pastor Fr. Carlos Sierra can’t blame the choir for the first liturgical faux pas of the season. When the singers declined to sing the Gloria, Sierra enthusiastically led the assembly in reading the new text.

By the end, Sierra realized what he had done.

“That is the words of the new Glory,” Sierra said. “Except that in Advent we don’t say it. But it’s good practice.”

Sierra has been preparing his parish for the new translation for weeks in his Sunday homilies. The opportunity for people to really examine what they are praying and why has been a blessing, he said.

“It’s not there automatically,” he said.

When sleepwalking through the Mass is not an option there’s always a chance the prayers will catch us by the heart. Which is not to say everybody embraces change.

“I like the old one better,” said Kate Semple, a Grade 9 student, after the Saturday evening Mass at St. Brigid’s. “The old one was easier to learn.”

Diana FitzGerald, who teaches catechism to Catholic public school children, notes the new language is more difficult, especially in a city full of immigrants whose first language may not be English.

“Consubstantiation, that’s a very difficult word,” she said.

But even the difficult words may eventually get easier, she said.

“You get used to it,” said FitzGerald.

For Maria Martinez the surprising thing about the new English translation is how some of it is closer to the words she grew up saying in Spanish. Right off the top, the new reply to the priest’s greeting of “The Lord be with you,” now translated as “And with your spirit,” is just what is said in Spanish — “Y con tu espíritu.”

Gerald Day was struck by similarities to an Anglican service he recently attended.

“I was astounded how close they were,” he said on his way out from Lourdes.

Sharma Mahendralingan at Lourdes didn’t realize the new translation would be used the first Sunday of Advent.

“I wasn’t expecting a change, but it was OK,” said Mahendralingan.

“I noticed there were some changes and they were interesting, but minor,” said Lourdes parishioner Martha Lynch.

The new translation is an opportunity for everybody in Toronto to get a little closer to the liturgy, said Archbishop Thomas Collins in a letter to the archdiocese.

“We pray that the Third Edition of the Roman Missal will bring us new appreciation for a sacrament that is the summit of our experience as Catholics,” he wrote. “Renewed in worship, renewed in Christ, let us walk together as this new chapter of our faith journey unfolds.”

FROM FCJ COMPANIONS IN MISSION ONLINE

June 12th, 2005 was a very special day for FCJs in Toronto as the Companions in Mission (Dovercourt) made their commitment for two years. Marcella, as facilitator of the programme, had met with Susan, Tomi and Molly each month over the course of two years.

The three companions in Mission and eighteen others, including Francisco and Carlos who had made their commitment earlier, assembled in our chapel/living room/dining room area. The commitment took place before Mass. Fr Bill Addley SJ presided at the Mass and in attendance was Fr Scott Lewis, SJ, a professor at Regis College.

Afterwards, with the help of Jane, Lois Anne and Mary we served a full dinner buffet. Cameras clicked for formal as well as informal picture-taking during the course of the afternoon.

FROM www.ronadea.com

Teen's special musical talent showcase

From the FILIPINIANA NEWS, June 2009, page 52: written by Arnie Quesada

It was an evening of Special Dinner and a Special Concert by a Special Teenager with a Special Talent. It was everything special held at an extraordinary venue-- at the Braeben Golf & Country Club in the City of Mississauga.

An evening an autistic concert pianist presented himself at his first solo fund raising concert proceeds of which went to the Autistic Special School of his parent`s hometown, Paete, Laguna, Philippines.

Ron Michael Adea, the only child of Romeo (Jun) Adea and Lucy Carolino Adea was born with PDD (Pervasive Development Disorder) Autism with a special talent for math and piano. He learned to play the piano at an early age by memory. He loves to play classical compositions of famous composers like Beethoven, Lizt and Chopin.

The concert was a success with several notable guests, sponsors and donors in attendance including Ms. Evangeline Cayongcat, the Cultural officer of the Philippine Consulate General of Toronto, Msgr. Espedito Joano, Founder Spiritual Director of the Fil-Ontario Seminary Scholarship Inc. who gave the opening prayers that night.

Delegates from the Parish of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in downtown Toronto, members of the Sunday morning 8thirtychoir of Our Lady of Lourdes led by Fr. Terry Fay, SJ and Pastor Fr. Bill Addley, SJ.

Paetenians International Northeast chapter (New York, New Jersey & Pennsylvania) and Paetenians International Southern California were present to support this worthy project of the Canada chapter. Other guests were Mississauga's Kalayaan Mama Ching Quejas accompanied by Ben Cadang, families from the Filipino Canadian Parents Support Group and many friends, former teachers of Ron.

A PRAYER:
I just want to be where you are, dwelling daily in your presence.
I don`t want to worship from afar, draw me near to where you are.
I just want to be where you are,
in your dwelling place forever and ever, amen!

Fr. Bill, God loves you so much and so do we at Our lady of Lourdes Parish, Toronto. (Excerpt from lyrics of Don Moen`s song)


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