PART 2: PHNO SPECIAL PAGE ON THE WEB FOR GILBERTO 'GIBO' TEODORO, JR
 

TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA, MAY 21, 2010 (PHNO) Culled by Lee Quesada: www.newsflash.org - Our country, the Philippines, now for decades have been corrupt of its beauty and purity by declining and decadent rulers of government. And now here we are. With a brand new President and where are we going? Philippine president apparent, Benigno 'Noynoy' Aquino III pledged a 'would-be lean, graft-free Cabinet, to travel overseas less, investigate corruption and renew peace talks on ending decades long insurgencies'. Sounding all very politically cliché. Therefore, hard to grasp this election promises. The elections are done. We have conceded. We have accepted Noynoy as our next President. We know his win meant one important thing, that democracy is alive in the Philippines. How he, as our new leader, can make this democracy work to lessen the corruption and uplift the lives of the poor and totally innovate our educational system so our students, the youth of our country will excel and have better lives in their new world of advanced technology and competitive global economy, the 21st Century global community.... is and will be the same unanswered question. No one ever before and in the last decades have seriously tried. Gloria Arroyo tried a little and failed big time in the longest 9-years of her reign. We hope and pray, this time the Philippines will be enabled to move, move forward to its full potential as a bright and democratic country within the global community, with Noynoy in the helm. We give him 6 years and so we will wait and see.  And we continue to hope steadfastly and pray! 

POST ELECTION NEWS: MAY 21, 2010 FROM THE DAILY INQUIRER @INQUIRER.NET

Teodoro seeks 'deeper inquiry' into alleged poll fraud By Lira Dalangin-Fernandez INQUIRER.net First Posted 07:24:00 05/21/2010 Filed Under: Eleksyon 2010, Politics, Elections

MANILA, Philippines -- An alleged victim of vote-shaving in the May 10 automated elections, administration standard-bearer Gilbert Teodoro Jr. has called for an investigation into allegations of fraud by an unidentified witness.

“The allegation of electoral fraud made by the alleged whistleblower demands no less than a serious investigation as to the veracity of his statements,” Teodoro, who ran under the banner of the Lakas-Kampi-Christian Muslim Democrats, said in a statement Friday.

“In the interest, therefore, of transparency which is a standard that we cherish in governance, I request all concerned to take the necessary steps in order to determine the truth of the allegations made by the whistleblower because if proven correct, they seriously affect the integrity of the election. If, on the contrary, there is no closure to this controversy, there will always be a lingering doubt on the outcome of the election,” he added.

Teodoro, fourth in the ongoing tally of the presidential race, said he wanted a deeper inquiry into the claims of the masked witness in the interest of truth and to remove taints on the credibility of the country’s first automated elections.

Teodoro has conceded to front-runner Senator Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III.

“If the statement of the whistleblower is proven false, then he must suffer the corresponding penalties. But such shall only be known, after a transparent, public and thorough investigation by an impartial body,” he said.

The witness, described by Makati Representative Teodoro Locsin Jr., as a “koala bear,” said the votes of Teodoro, Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino’s Joseph Estrada and Bangon Pilipinas’ Eddie Villanueva were shaved to benefit dilaw, or yellow, Aquino's campaign color.

Newspaper communist Buddy Cunanan said Teodoro lost about five million to six million votes, while Villanueva lost two million to three million votes. Estrada also lost a lot, he added did not provide a figure.

Vice presidential candidate Loren Legarda, who has conceded the race, supposedly lost four million to five million through vote-shaving.

The votes were allegedly transferred to Binay, according to the witness.

The Commission on Elections has dismissed the claims of the witness.

CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS PASS-IN-REVIEW:
Presenting Gibo, the man: his mind, his spirit, his heart, his understanding of our country, his mission.

FROM THE 'PHILIPPINE CENTER OF INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM:

Gilberto C. Teodoro Jr. ‘Scary brilliant’ guy, zero social, love life
by Maritoni Tiongco, Beatriz Bermundo, Katreena Cosme and Eliza Ferolino Saturday, May 1st, 2010 · Share this story

GIBO TEODORO'S LAW SCHOOL study buddies spew out superlatives when asked for proof that Gilberto Cojuangco Teodoro Jr., candidate for president of the administration Lakas-Kampi party, is true “Galing at Talino.”

Teodoro finished at the top of his class at the University of the Philippines College of Law in 1989. The same year, he passed the bar with a score of 86.185 percent, landing No. 1 among thousands of examinees.

Teodoro tops 1989 bar exam with a score of 86.185. (From UP Law Center)

And yet, this “very intelligent,” unconventional nerd was, they add, also a “very unassuming” and “very cool” person. Even as he was scoring quite well in class, Teodoro also dabbled in basketball, often went home straight from school, was never linked to anyone romantically, and not once hooked up with the activists on campus.

They called him plain “Gilbert” back then. His father and namesake had served as Social Security System administrator, and his mother, representative from their home province of Tarlac. He was so unassuming that one of his study group buddies did not realize Gilbert was so fully pedigreed until some time later.

Most Sundays before the bar exam, Teodoro hit the books with three batch buddies and now fellow lawyers – Antonio La Viña, who is now dean of the Ateneo School of Government; Rodrigo Lope Quimbo, who is now a partner in the Quisimbing Torres Law; and Jaime Hofileña, who is now a partner in the Poblador Bautista and Reyes Law.

Quiet, likeable

La Viña and Quimbo knew all at once about Teodoro’s parents being public figures. Hofileña did not until after another classmate told him about it. It was while studying together for the bar that the three say they witnessed the brilliance of Gilbert.

Quimbo says Teodoro struck him “like a quiet guy who was very private… but (also) very bright.”

La Viña describes him as “likeable and approachable… very bright, seemed to be always prepared.”

Asked to put a label on his study buddy, Hofileña paced his thoughts, and then says he thinks “nerd” would be more like it. Nonetheless, “the results show: he finished top of his original batch. He topped the bar… if it wasn’t for our study group.”

Teodoro was good in class as also in their private study sessions they held at the house of La Viña or Hofileña, but never in Teodoro’s house.

The four would exchange notes, answer past bar exam questions, quiz one another, and most times, Teodoro gave the precise answers. “It was at this time when I knew that he would top the exams.” Quimbo recalls. Even during the study sessions, he says Teodoro was “very focused” and “very driven academically.”

Scary brilliant

Despite this, Hofileña says studying all the time was never Teodoro’s way. “I never see him studying there, that’s the problem.”

His intellect was very impressive, even daunting, according to La Viña. “It was scary being with Gibo who had memorized every constitutional provision and all the relevant laws and could cite all the SCRA (Supreme Court Rulings Annotated) volumes for many Supreme Court decisions.”

He was so brilliant Teodoro always had answers to their questions, even without having to consult law books. It reached a point when Hofileña says he felt inadequate during the study sessions. Teodoro remembered the finer points that the others did not notice at all. “It seems he has a gift for studying,” but did not seem to be studying as hard, and between study sessions, also played hoops with Hofileña.

His routine was pretty well established: He would attend class, tarry just a while in campus, and then disappear. Once in a while, he would be spotted at the library, just for brief periods.

Hofileña tells of a “legend” about Teodoro that went around at the law school. “Legend has it that he never even entered the library. Legend also has it that he had his own library at home.”

Teodoro was so absorbed in his academics not one of his friends knew or heard about his being a member of any organizations or fraternities, except only for their bar exam study group. Not one of his friends also recalls him having any romantic relationship back then.

This story of a brilliant student starts and ends the trip to memory lane of Teodoro’s years in law school for his review buddies. Social life? Night life? Gimmicks? There is hardly anything more they could say about Teodoro as he was nearly totally inactive in school.

Conservative lot

Former UP president, Dr.Francisco Nemenzo, is not surprised at all. Despite all talk of the state university being the hotbed of activism, Nemenzo describes UP law school students as conservative by nature because of their respect for authority and reverence for the laws.

The years Teodoro spent at the law school – 1985 to 1989 – was also a period that witnessed the decline of student activism, and the UP College of Law had turned its focus on memorization rather than political discussion.

Many students who transfer to UP from other schools like Teodoro did not automatically turn activists, Nemenzo says. Teodoro obtained his undergraduate degree in Commerce from De la Salle University in 1985, and finished secondary school at Xavier University in 1981.

Teodoro obtained his masters of laws degree from Harvard Law School in Boston, Massachusetts in 1997.

Hofileña sees another side to Teodoro’s non-involvement in campus politics. The law school and its faculty, he recalls, had no united stand on issues, the university respects one’s personal choice to be or not to be activists.

Besides, he says Teodoro was very busy with other commitments outside school, including being a member of the Sangguniang Kabataan in Tarlac and learning how to fly planes. “He was some sort of a reserved officer in the Air Force.”

That early, he had jumped into politics, a natural thing to do, according to Hofileña, for one born to the part almost.

“I think that even then he was motivated by a calling for public service that characterized also his own father’s public life,” La Viña says. “At the same time, Gibo was not necessarily interested in holding power for its own sake.”

Yet while they were just students, Hofileña says Teodoro and his study buddies shared the same, simple goal: to become lawyers. Running for president was not part of it at all. Thus, when Teodoro finally decided to do so, even his law school friends were stunned to some degree.

FROM THE WEB SITE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENSE OF THE PHILIPPINES
URL: <http://www.dnd.gov.ph/DNDWEBPAGE_files/teodoro/teodoro.htm>

Honorable Gilberto “Gilbert” Cojuangco Teodoro, Jr. is the youngest Secretary to hold the Defense portfolio at the age of 43, when he assumed the post in August 2007. As head of the Department of National Defense, Secretary Teodoro is keen on ably pursuing Philippine defense reforms and is determined to make the defense and military establishment truly responsive to the needs and aspirations of the Filipino people.

Before he became the Secretary of National Defense, he was Congressman of the First District of Tarlac for three (3) consecutive terms starting 1998. At the House, he assumed the position of Assistant Majority Leader (11th Congress) and Head of the Nationalist People’s Coalition House members. He was also a member of the House contingent to the Legislative-Executive Development Advisory Council.

His passion for public service and aptitude for leadership is evident even at a very young age. Shortly after he completed his secondary education at the Xavier School, he was elected President of the Kabataang Barangay for Tarlac in 1980 and concurrently assumed Presidency of the Kabataang Barangay for Central Luzon until 1985. He also became a member of the Sanguniang Panlalawigan of Tarlac from 1980 to 1986.

Even with his hands full, Secretary Teodoro successfully completed his Bachelor of Science in Commerce, Major in Financial Institutions at the De La Salle University in 1984. Since then, he focused his sights on acquiring for himself further education and knowledge to aid him in his desire to pursue public service. In 1989, he completed his Law studies at the University of the Philippines where he was awarded the Dean’s Medal for Academic Excellence. In the same year, he topped the Philippine Bar exams.

For seven years, he honed his skills as a lawyer in the famed EP Mendoza Law firm. Armed with years of experience, he went to the Harvard Law School in Cambridge for his Master of Laws and completed it in 1997. He was also admitted to the State Bar of New York during the same year.

Secretary Teodoro, who holds distinct memberships in the Integrated Bar of the Philippines, UP Alumni Association, UP Law Alumni Association, Harvard Alumni Association and the Harvard Law Alumni Association, is also a licensed commercial pilot and a Colonel in the Philippine Air Force Reserve. He is the son of the former SSS Administrator Gilberto, Sr., and Mercedes Cojuangco and is married to Representative Monica Prieto-Teodoro; they have one son – Jaime Gilberto.

Department of National Defense From WikiPilipinas: The Hip 'n Free Philippine Encyclopedia

Established: March 22, 1897 Re-established: December 21, 1935 Organized: November 1, 1939 Secretary: Norberto B. Gonzales (Officer-in-charge until August 3, 2007) Gilberto C. Teodoro, Jr. (Secretary effective on August 3, 2007) Budget: P49.342 billion (2007) Website: www.dnd.gov.ph The Philippines' Department of National Defense (Filipino: Kagawaran ng Tanggulang Pambansa), abbreviated as DND is the executive department of the Philippine Government responsible for guarding the country against external and internal threats to its national peace and security. The Department of National Defense exercises executive supervision over the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), the Office of Civil Defense (OCD), the Philippine Veterans Affairs Office (PVAO), the National Defense College of the Philippines (NDCP), and the Government Arsenal (GA).

It is headed by the Secretary of National Defense, who is a member of the President's Cabinet. The current Secretary of National Defense of the Philippines is Atty. Gilberto Teodoro, Jr. who was a Congressman of the First District of Tarlac for three (3) consecutive terms starting 1998, assumes the position of Assistant Majority Leader (11th Congress) and Head of the Nationalist People’s Coalition House members. He was also a member of the House contingent to the Legislative-Executive Development Advisory Council.

The Department of National Defense was formally organized on November 1, 1939 pursuant to Executive Order No. 230 of President Manuel L. Quezon, to implement Commonwealth Act No. 1 or the National Defense Act of 1935 passed by the National Assembly on December 21, 1935 and Commonwealth Act No. 340 creating the department.

Representative, 1st District of Province of Tarlac
June 30, 1998–June 30, 2007

Teodoro is the only child of Gilberto C. Teodoro Sr., the former Social Security System administrator and Mercedes Cojuangco, former Batasang Pambansa member. Teodoro is closely identified with his uncle, San Miguel Corp. boss Eduardo Cojuangco Jr..

Teodoro got exposed to politics at an early age, serving as president of the Kabataang Barangay in Tarlac from 1980 to 1985 and the KB Federation of Central Luzon. He also became a member of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan.

Interests Teodoro has been reading “The Miracle of Asia”, a book which cites the story of the development of China and Indonesia and a book about the insurgenicies of fourth generation warfare entitled “The Slingshot and the Stone”. He listens to 70s and 80s music and bands like the Beach House, Itchyworms, Rivermaya, and Parokya ni Edgar.

Education Teodoro graduated from De La Salle University with a degree in Management of Financial Institutions. He also holds a law degree from the University of the Philippines, and a master’s degree from the Harvard Law School in the US.

Teodoro topped the bar exams in 1989, becoming one of the youngest bar topnotchers in the country. He also took and passed the New York State Bar exams in 1997.

Teodoro is married to Monica Louise Prieto, a Representative of Tarlac. He is also the father of Jaime Gilberto Teodoro.

Career Teodoro is the youngest secretary to hold the Defense portfolio at the age of 43, when he assumed the post in August 2007. As head of the Department of National Defense, Teodoro is keen on ably pursuing Philippine defense reforms and is determined to make the defense and military establishment truly responsive to the needs and aspirations of the Filipino people.

Before he became the Secretary of National Defense, he was Congressman of the First District of Tarlac for three (3) consecutive terms starting 1998. At the House, he assumed the position of Assistant Majority Leader (11th Congress) and Head of the Nationalist People’s Coalition House members. He was also a member of the House contingent to the Legislative-Executive Development Advisory Council.

His passion for public service and aptitude for leadership is evident even at a very young age. Shortly after he completed his secondary education at the Xavier School, he was elected President of the Kabataang Barangay for Tarlac in 1980 and concurrently assumed Presidency of the Kabataang Barangay for Central Luzon until 1985. He also became a member of the Sanguniang Panlalawigan of Tarlac from 1980 to 1986.

Even with his hands full, Teodoro completed his Bachelor of Science in Commerce, Major in Financial Institutions at the De La Salle University in 1984. Since then, he focused his sights on acquiring for himself further education and knowledge to aid him in his desire to pursue public service. In 1989, he completed his Law studies at the University of the Philippines where he was awarded the Dean’s Medal for Academic Excellence. In the same year, he topped the Philippine Bar exams.

Lawyer and a Pilot For seven years, he honed his skills as a lawyer in the famed EP Mendoza Law firm. Armed with years of experience, he went to the Harvard Law School in Cambridge for his Master of Laws and completed it in 1997. He was also admitted to the State Bar of New York during the same year.

Teodoro, who holds distinct memberships in the Integrated Bar of the Philippines, UP Alumni Association, UP Law Alumni Association, Harvard Alumni Association and the Harvard Law Alumni Association, is also a licensed commercial pilot and a Colonel in the Philippine Air Force Reserve.

from the ASIAN CORRESSPONDENT ONLINE- http://us.asiancorrespondent.com/

Of all the Philippine presidential candidates in this year’s general elections, no one has inspired the youth and captivated their imagination more than former defense secretary Gilbert ‘Gibo’ Teodoro.

Of course, the left-leaning League of Filipino Students and the Kabataan Partylist organization would totally disagree with that supposition.

But there is no mistake that the reason Teodoro has trail blazed in the campuses and attracted many students is because of his intellect, articulateness and good looks – characteristics and traits that youth are most fascinated with.

Teodoro is taking off where former senators Miriam Defensor-Santiago and the late Raul Roco left off – both of whom launched their own failed presidential bids by hopping from one campus to another with the hope of mobilizing the youth.

That is where comparisons between the two former presidential candidates and Teodoro however end even if all of them held impeccable scholastic records during their student days.

While both Santiago and Roco were then candidates of a faction of a fractured opposition, Teodoro is the anointed bet of the ruling Lakas-KAMPI-CMD party.

Santiago (she ran in the 1992 presidential elections) and Roco (2004) enjoyed national exposure by virtue of them having been elected senators and landing on the top of the heap before they joined the presidential race.

Teodoro, on the other hand, crashed into the national political limelight only after he was appointed defense chief – a rather not so visible position although very strategic in terms of clout and influence.  

Although only 45 years old, Teodoro is already a seasoned politician. He first joined politics as a member of the Marcos-era Kabataang Barangay and was seated as a member of the town council in his hometown in Tarlac.

He was undefeated as a congressman representing his district in Tarlac when he later rejoined politics and was a favorite nephew and protégé of former Marcos crony and business tycoon Eduardo ‘Danding’ Cojuangco.

Teodoro is trailing behind his cousin Benigno ‘Noynoy’ Aquino III and Manny Villar in almost all surveys but isn’t losing hope he will emerge the winner after the May 10 elections.

He is pinning his hopes on 51 of the country’s 82 governors who have pledged their support to him.

The campaign period for candidates seeking seats in the local government won’t start until Friday, March 26. 

It remains to be seen if the pledge of support from provincial governors and other Lakas-KAMPI-CMD local government officials will help turn the tide for Teodoro.

Teodoro however also hopes to tap the youth and student sector as a provider of core warm bodies for his presidential bid, organizing them into his Green Team or Green Army.

With more than half of the country’s estimated 51 million registered voters falling into the 35 years old and below age brackets, the youth vote will, for the first time in the history of Philippine elections, be a significant and decisive force in the country’s electoral politics.

The youth are by nature idealists, energetic and excellent and articulate propagandists.  Where their voices go will be a big factor for a presidential candidate hoping to win in a three or four-cornered contest.

Gibo’s Green Team must in turn launch their campaign in the most creative way.

Teodoro’s biggest drawback and liability is his identification with the unpopular Arroyo administration.

The Green Team should address this public perception squarely rather than evade it.  The Green Team should turn the skeptical into believers that Gibo will be his own man.  

Their candidate, after all, has shown he can transcend politics of patronage and has shown a strong political will.

Cutting his umbilical cord with uncle Danding, and decisive expulsion of the Ampatuans from the ruling political party at the instance of the Ampatuan massacre, are strong points of Teodoro they should capitalize on.

More importantly, Teodoro’s vision and platform of government, including his economic agenda, are a cut above the rest of the presidential candidates. This is where the positive sides of Teodoro stand out.

My friends from the Left may disagree, but Teodoro should be a better adversary as a president than the outright traditional politician Manny Villar and the pseudo-progressive Noynoy Aquino. 

At the onset, the Left will not have to make pretensions of cooperating with a government that will inevitably preserve the status quo and end up frustrated with either Villar or Aquino sitting as the president.

I would rather see the Red and the Green square off in the post presidential election.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART 3...


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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