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SPORTS NEWS THE PAST WEEKS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

OLYMPICS: PINOYS BREAK SWEAT, TRAIN HARD IN RIO
[RELATED: 20 years ago in Atlanta]


JULY 28 -Jasmine Alkhaldi (right) in the Athletes’ Village. ABAC CORDERO RIO DE JANEIRO
- As the final countdown to the 2016 Rio Olympics began Tuesday, the seven Filipino athletes who have settled in at the Athletes Village went out to flex their muscles in their respective training venues. In Rio, it was 10 days before the opening ceremony. For the athletes who are already here, it’s the final push. Seven of the 12 qualified Filipino athletes are already in town, safely tucked in Building 2 of the Athletes Village, with rows and rows of condominiums to house the close to 11,000 athletes and 6,000 coaches and officials from 206 countries. After shaking off jetlag last Monday, swimmers Jessie Khing Lacuna and Jasmine Alkhaldi, weightlifters Nestor Colonia and Hidilyn Diaz, taekwondo’s Kirstie Elaine Alora, long jumper Marestella Torres-Sunang and table tennis’ Ian Lariba went out to train. Lariba, in her first Olympics and tapped as flag-bearer for the Aug. 5 opening ceremony, said it’s very important for her to get here ahead of schedule. “It’s good for all of us. On my part, I need all the extra time to familiarize myself with the competition – from the ball speed to the table and the venue itself,” said Lariba, who trained nearly two hours Tuesday morning. “I wanted to get used to the color of the table, the color of the floor. In the Philippines our tables are blue and the floors are red. Here, the tables are of different shade of blue. The floors are green. You need to get used to that, too” she said. “The size of the venue also affects the speed of the ball and the audio of the impact. You use that sound, that audio in making your shots. The size of the venue plays a factor. The smaller the venue, the faster the ball is. We consider all these,” she said. In two days at the venue, made up of a warm-up area with eight tables, training area with 16 tables and main competition venue with four tables, Lariba said she had gotten a feel of things. She hopes they could serve her well when she competes in her first Olympics. Among the 12 Pinoy athletes here, she will be the first to see action at around 9 a.m. of Aug. 6 or just 12 hours after the opening ceremony. READ MORE...RELATED, 20 years ago in Atlanta...

ALSO: Pinoy boxers touch down in Rio, go for gold


JULY 29 -Filipino boxers Rogen Ladon and lightweight Charly Suarez arrive in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil for the 2016 Olympics. Also in the photo is Philippine chef-de-mission Jose Romasanta. | Abac Cordero
RIO DE JANEIRO – Two Filipino boxers with equal chances of winning a medal in this Rio Olympics arrived Thursday afternoon from a one-month training in the US, and declared their readiness to slug it out with the world’s finest competitors.
Light-flyweight Rogen Ladon and lightweight Charly Suarez flew in from Las Vegas via Houston accompanied by a lone coach, Nolito “Boy” Velasco. They arrived here eight days before the opening ceremony on August 5. For both boxers, it’s their first Olympics. “First time,” said the 22-year-old Ladon of Bago City in Negros Occidental, the birthplace of Mansueto “Onyok” Velasco, a silver medalist in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, and brother Roel Velasco, bronze winner in 1992 in Barcelona. Mansueto’s silver in the light-flyweight class was the last medal in the Olympics for the Philippines, which is fielding 12 athletes in seven sports and hoping to finally end the 20-year medal drought in the Summer Games. Ladon is aware that the country of more than 100 million has long been searching for an Olympic hero. Under this circumstance, Filipinos, known as die-hard boxing and basketball fans, will settle for a medal of any color. Ladon said he wants to win the gold. “Go for gold tayo,” said Ladon, borrowing the slogan of the Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines headed by Ricky Vargas. Ladon said it’s been his lifelong dream to make it to the Olympics, and follow the footsteps of the Velasco brothers. He said he did everything in training the past two years as he hoped that someday he will win an Olympic medal. “Every athlete dreams of being in the Olympics,” said Ladon as he walked with some members of the Philippine delegation, including chef-de-mission Jose Romasanta, from the Pinoy quarters to the main dining hall of the Athletes Village. “Step by step,” said Suarez, who will turn 28 on August 14. If he gets the breaks, the Bible-preaching native of Sawata in Davao del Norte will be fighting in the semifinals of the 60 kg weight class on his birthday, assured of a bronze. READ MORE...

ALSO: If Jinkee Pacquiao had her way, no more boxing for Manny
[RELATED: Pacquiao: Boxing is how I help my family]


JULY 28 -Jinkee Pacquiao with daughters Princess and Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave a restaurant after having lunch in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, 26 April 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA
Jinkee Pacquiao with daughters Princess and Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave a restaurant after having lunch in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, 26 April 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA If Jinkee Pacquiao had her way, boxing had already seen the last of Manny Pacquiao. But that doesn’t seem to be the case as boxing’s only eight-division world champion is leaning towards a ring return later in the year just three months since announcing his retirement. “Advice ko, kung ako, sana wala na,” Jinkee told reporters Wednesday. “Sa akin lang ha. Hindi naman ako magagalit. Suggestion ko lang yon sa kanya.” Jinkee accompanied Manny to Mahindra’s game against San Miguel Beer in the PBA at Smart Araneta Coliseum where the Enforcer eked out a 105-103 win, the team’s third in as many games. READ: With Senate session suspended, Pacquiao attends PBA game The two may not share the same sentiment when it comes to Manny’s potential return possibly in November, but Jinkee isn’t going to keep her husband away from his passion. “Maiintindihan ko naman kung gusto talaga niya. Siguro nami-miss niya mag-practice, siguro hinahanap din ng katawan niya pero okay lang naman kung gusto niya.” READ MORE...RELATED, Pacquiao: Boxing is how I help my family...

ALSO: Pacquiao can fight, but only between Senate rounds


JULY 22 -Senator Manny Pacquiao faces the media be JULLIANE LOVE DE JESUS/INQUIRER.net FILE PHOTO
As long as he could perform his duties as legislator, Sen. Manny “Pacman” Pacquiao may go back to the boxing ring. Senate President Franklin Drilon yesterday expressed his support for Pacquiao’s reported plan to go back to boxing, confirming for the first time that the newly-elected senator had sought his permission to fight again. “He asked me if he can box. I said ‘there’s nothing to prevent you, but you can do it in a manner that will not interfere with your job as a senator because you will be severely criticized.’ And so I said ‘you can box during the break,” said Drilon of the lawmaker in a Senate forum yesterday. Pacquiao was notoriously absent during his stint as Sarangani representative in the last Congress. The schedule of the 17th Congress has yet to be finalized, but the Senate usually takes a brief break between October and November. Pacquiao usually trains for eight weeks for his bouts. Pacquiao’s promoter Bob Arum had said last week that the boxer-turned-politician, also an international product endorser, businessman, playing basketball coach and occasional actor and recording artist, was planning a return bout sometime in November. The senator, who attended a single session of Congress and had 16 absences “without notice” in the final session of the 16th Congress, then denied that he was planning to take a leave from the Senate just so he could fight. In a statement, he said “my priority is my legislative work,” backing up his earlier vow to score a “perfect attendance” in his foray into the national legislature. READ MORE...

ALSO: Pacquiao could take on Crawford, but …
[RELATED: Roach doesn't want Pacquiao to fight Crawford soon]


JULY 26 -Manny Pacquiao during the final press conference at the David Copperfield Theater inside MGM Hotel in Las Vegas, April 6, 2016. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA
IF PLANS pitting Manny Pacquiao and Terence Crawford on Nov. 5 pushes through, the Filipino legend will have to shed more weight than he’s used to.
After beating Ukrainian Viktor Postol by unanimous decision in Las Vegas Saturday night (Sunday in Manila), Crawford announced that he intends to stay as king of the light welterweight division. Pacquiao has fought as a welterweight (147 lb) since 2012, including his “farewell victory” over Timothy Bradley on April 9. The last time the Pacquiao fought at 140 was when he beat Bradley for the International Boxing Organization crown. Even promoter Bob Arum, who had anointed the winner between Crawford and Postol, along with WBO welterweight titlist Jessie Vargas, as Pacquiao’s likely foe in his comeback fight, turned silent on the likelihood of a Pacquiao-Crawford, confounding American boxing analysts. Pacquiao, a bloated welterweight, claims that he can still make 135 lb if he wants to. Postol served as Pacquiao’s chief sparring partner in the course of his preparations for American Chris Algieri in 2014 in Macau. Pacquiao sent Algieri to the canvas six times. If Roach deems it unwise for 37-year-old Pacquiao to fight 28-year-old Crawford at 140, there’s still a chance for a catch weight at 144 (Pacquiao-Juan Manuel Marquez 3). The lure of making at least $6 million against Pacquiao, which is way beyond the $1.3M he made against Postol, may yet prove to be irresistible for Crawford. FULL REPORT...RELATED, Roach doesn't want Pacquiao to fight Crawford soon...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Pinoys break sweat, train hard in Rio


Jasmine Alkhaldi (right) in the Athletes’ Village. ABAC CORDERO RIO DE JANEIRO

MANILA, AUGUST 1, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Abac Cordero Updated July 28, 2016 - 12:00am - As the final countdown to the 2016 Rio Olympics began Tuesday, the seven Filipino athletes who have settled in at the Athletes Village went out to flex their muscles in their respective training venues.

In Rio, it was 10 days before the opening ceremony. For the athletes who are already here, it’s the final push.

Seven of the 12 qualified Filipino athletes are already in town, safely tucked in Building 2 of the Athletes Village, with rows and rows of condominiums to house the close to 11,000 athletes and 6,000 coaches and officials from 206 countries.

After shaking off jetlag last Monday, swimmers Jessie Khing Lacuna and Jasmine Alkhaldi, weightlifters Nestor Colonia and Hidilyn Diaz, taekwondo’s Kirstie Elaine Alora, long jumper Marestella Torres-Sunang and table tennis’ Ian Lariba went out to train.

Lariba, in her first Olympics and tapped as flag-bearer for the Aug. 5 opening ceremony, said it’s very important for her to get here ahead of schedule.

“It’s good for all of us. On my part, I need all the extra time to familiarize myself with the competition – from the ball speed to the table and the venue itself,” said Lariba, who trained nearly two hours Tuesday morning.

“I wanted to get used to the color of the table, the color of the floor. In the Philippines our tables are blue and the floors are red. Here, the tables are of different shade of blue. The floors are green. You need to get used to that, too” she said.

“The size of the venue also affects the speed of the ball and the audio of the impact. You use that sound, that audio in making your shots. The size of the venue plays a factor. The smaller the venue, the faster the ball is. We consider all these,” she said.

In two days at the venue, made up of a warm-up area with eight tables, training area with 16 tables and main competition venue with four tables, Lariba said she had gotten a feel of things.

She hopes they could serve her well when she competes in her first Olympics. Among the 12 Pinoy athletes here, she will be the first to see action at around 9 a.m. of Aug. 6 or just 12 hours after the opening ceremony.

READ MORE...

Lariba, the flag bearer, is having mixed emotions.

“I’m nervous and excited at the same time. There’s pressure,” she said over dinner of salmon, vegetable salad and fruits, in the company of her South Korean coach Mi Sook Kwon.

Lacuna and Alkhaldi were at the pool twice Tuesday morning and afternoon. Each visit lasted two hours, and in the company of their respective coaches, Archie Lim and American Jennifer Buffin.

“I guess everybody’s feeling better now. We’re all sleeping better. We’re all rested,” said Lacuna, who trained three months in Australia for this Olympics. It was his longest overseas training.

Last Monday, members of the Philippine delegation moved around Rio de Janeiro to loosen up.

Alkhaldi flew in the other day from Hawaii via Dallas and Miami, a trip that covered 31 hours. She will vie in the women’s 100-m freestyle; Lacuna in the men’s 400-m freestyle.

Unlike Lariba, both Lacuna and Alkhaldi are in their second Olympics after seeing action in London in 2012.

Colonia (men’s 56 kg) and Diaz (women’s 53 kg) were at the training venue at 6 p.m.

“We’re okay,” said Colonia.


List of Filipino Athletes Who are Already Qualified to Play in the 2016 Rio Olympics- Name: Eric Shauwn Cray Event: 400 m hurdles Name: Rogen Ladon Event: Boxing (Light flyweight) Name: Charly Suarez Event: Boxing (Lightweight) Name: Ian Lariba Event: Table Tennis (Women's singles) Name: Kristie Alora Event: Taekwondo (Women's +67 kg)

Diaz, the 2012 London Olympics flag bearer, is in her third Olympics. The past few days she was coughing hard but has started to feel better with the help of team physician Ferdinand Brawner.

Alora (women’s +67 kg) trained twice Tuesday. She did plyometrics in the morning then sparred with her coach, former Southeast Asian Games finweight Kitoy Cruz in the afternoon.

“We always do that,” said Alora of her sparring session with the six-time SEA Games champion from 1991 to 2001. In Manila, she normally spars with male members of the national pool.

Torres, in her third straight Olympics like Diaz, also trained with her coach, Joebert Delicano.

Chef-de-mission Jose Romasanta is making sure everything is in place for the Philippine delegation here in Rio. He is joined here by Philippine Olympic Committee officials Jeff Tamayo, the second vice president, and Julian Camacho, the treasurer.

The Philippines is seeking to end a 20-year medal drought in the Olympics. The last time a Filipino athlete came home with a medal was in 1996 from Atlanta when boxer Onyok Velasco won the silver in the light-flyweight division.

“Things are in place. Our athletes are fully rested now and are seriously training. If everything falls into place, the medal or medals will come,” said Romasanta.

-----------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR (COLUMN)

20 years ago THE GAME OF MY LIFE By Bill Velasco (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 1, 2016 - 12:00am 0 3 googleplus0 0

The 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro are fast approaching, and many Filipino sports fans are reserving their excitement until there is a very clear hope of winning a medal.

In other words, they’re trying not to get their hopes up. Twenty years ago, it was a different story.

The centennial of the modern Olympic Games was set in the warm, conservative city of Atlanta, where this writer covered the Olympic Games for the first time. Along with Ronnie Nathanielsz, Freddie Abando, Freddie Webb, Bea Lucero, Chiqui Roa-Puno, Christine Jacob and Lydia de Vega, we tried to cover as many events as humanly possible, sometimes working 18 hours a day.

There were often 16 events taking place at the same time, so you knew that you’d eventually end up in a sound booth recording over a match that had just taken place. I ended my days covering two basketball games by my lonesome until midnight.

Onyok Velasco made the finals against Bulgarian Daniel Bojilov, the first Filipino to make it that far since Anthony Villanueva in 1964.

It was the first time computerized scoring was being implemented (and manipulated), and the Philippines paid the price for going up against the last remaining countryman of AIBA’s president. Ron’s immortal cries of robbery are forever etched into our collective consciousness. It was a sad day for Philippine sports.

But there were also many historical moments in those two and a half weeks.

The US women’s basketball team, after a whirlwind world tour playing mostly against men’s teams, successfully laid claim to a gold medal, and gave birth to the Women’s National Basketball Association or WNBA. Lisa Leslie and Jennifer Azzi became household names, creating new generations of girls who could dream of making basketball their livelihood.


Muhammad Ali lights the the Olympic Flame at Atlanta 1996

On the men’s side, the third edition of the US Dream Team won the gold medal against Yugoslavia, with a special appearance by Muhammad Ali at halftime.

Ali was presented with a medal to replace his 1960 gold which he had thrown away in protest against racism in the US. It was also in Atlanta where Shaquille O’Neal announced that he was leaving the Orlando Magic for the Los Angeles Lakers.

The look on Penny Hardaway’s face said it all. He would never get within sniffing distance of an NBA title again.

Of course, to the non-sporting world, it was also where a home-made pipe bomb went off in Centennial Park, killing two people. Ron and I were walking less than a hundred feet from the blast. The ground shook, and we saw a woman in a red dress collapse, bleeding from shrapnel in her neck.


Two people died as a result of a bombing at the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, and more than 100 others were injured. Eric Robert Rudolph was convicted of placing the 40-pound bomb, filled with nails and screws, in Centennial Olympic Park. ON November 15, 200, Rudolph was simultaneously indicted by federal grand juries in Atlanta and Birmingham on a total of 23 charges. The indictments formalize charges previously filed against Rudolph for the Olympic Park bombing and two other bombings in Atlanta, as well as one in Birmingham. CNN

She and a Turkish cameraman who died of a heart attack were the only apparent casualties. We tried to get closer to the small crater the blast left behind, but were stopped by police who threatened to arrest us for supposedly obstructing their efforts. The entire downtown Atlanta was shut down within minutes, and we were confined to our booth at the International Broadcast Centre. Calls flooded in from our brothers in broadcasting in the Philippines, wondering how we were.

Despite the fact that the explosion was right behind CNN’s headquarters and in walking distance of temporary studios of the other American broadcast networks, we were able to report it first.

Centennial Park, which was built for those who didn’t have tickets for any of the games, was then fenced in. US president Bill Clinton arrived to assure the public that security was not an issue.

Security officer Richard Jewell, who had actually notified authorities of suspicious activity surrounding the bombing, was wrongfully accused of having been involved with the act instead, and it ruined his career.


Atlanta's Olympic Stadium during opening ceremonies in for the 1996 Summer Games.

On the technological front, four new types of cameras were first used in those games. The Skycam, an updated version of which was used in the FIBA Manila OQT, first floated on thin wires over the basketball games at the Georgia Dome.

After the first day, it was sparingly used, as it had the effect of making fastbreaks looked terribly slow. There were also cameras that followed divers from the peak of their dives to the bottom of the pool, others that snaked along cables following kayaks in raging rivers, and still others that could outrun the world’s fastest man to document winners in the sprints, minimizing the need for photo finishes.

Of course, the Atlanta Olympics were also criticized for mistakes committed by some of its volunteers and being overly commercialized. But for those of us who were there it was an eventful, historic celebration that changed our lives.

For those who will be in Rio, we wish the same thrilling experience.


PHILSTAR

Pinoy boxers touch down in Rio, go for gold By Abac Cordero (philstar.com) | Updated July 29, 2016 - 2:41pm 12 3 googleplus0 0


Filipino boxers Rogen Ladon and lightweight Charly Suarez arrive in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil for the 2016 Olympics. Also in the photo is Philippine chef-de-mission Jose Romasanta. | Abac Cordero

RIO DE JANEIRO – Two Filipino boxers with equal chances of winning a medal in this Rio Olympics arrived Thursday afternoon from a one-month training in the US, and declared their readiness to slug it out with the world’s finest competitors.

Light-flyweight Rogen Ladon and lightweight Charly Suarez flew in from Las Vegas via Houston accompanied by a lone coach, Nolito “Boy” Velasco. They arrived here eight days before the opening ceremony on August 5.

For both boxers, it’s their first Olympics.

“First time,” said the 22-year-old Ladon of Bago City in Negros Occidental, the birthplace of Mansueto “Onyok” Velasco, a silver medalist in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, and brother Roel Velasco, bronze winner in 1992 in Barcelona.

Mansueto’s silver in the light-flyweight class was the last medal in the Olympics for the Philippines, which is fielding 12 athletes in seven sports and hoping to finally end the 20-year medal drought in the Summer Games.

Ladon is aware that the country of more than 100 million has long been searching for an Olympic hero. Under this circumstance, Filipinos, known as die-hard boxing and basketball fans, will settle for a medal of any color.

Ladon said he wants to win the gold.

“Go for gold tayo,” said Ladon, borrowing the slogan of the Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines headed by Ricky Vargas.

Ladon said it’s been his lifelong dream to make it to the Olympics, and follow the footsteps of the Velasco brothers. He said he did everything in training the past two years as he hoped that someday he will win an Olympic medal.

“Every athlete dreams of being in the Olympics,” said Ladon as he walked with some members of the Philippine delegation, including chef-de-mission Jose Romasanta, from the Pinoy quarters to the main dining hall of the Athletes Village.

“Step by step,” said Suarez, who will turn 28 on August 14. If he gets the breaks, the Bible-preaching native of Sawata in Davao del Norte will be fighting in the semifinals of the 60 kg weight class on his birthday, assured of a bronze.

READ MORE...

Suarez is a two-time gold medalist in the Southeast Asian Games (2009 in Laos and 2011 in Jakarta) and silver medalist in the 2014 Incheon Asian Games.

“I think this my best chance to win a medal in the Olympics,” he said, adding that he was very satisfied with the training he and Ladon went through in Las Vegas and Washington.

"Okay naman, sir," he said.

“Boxing has always been a medal hope in the Olympics for our country,” said Romasanta, who said he could not understand why there’s only one coach to handle the two boxers in this Games that will run from August 5-21.

The Philippines tried to have another coach accredited for the Games but could not get what it wanted. Having a single coach to handle two boxers in a tournament of this magnitude is not the ideal situation for any team.

Romasanta is also concerned who would serve as cutman for the Filipino boxers – if needed. He joined the boxing team for lunch Thursday and offered the services of the Philippine team physician, Dr. Ferdinand Brawner, as cutman.

“With no head gear, there’s the possibility for any of our boxers to suffer a cut, considering that they have to fight as many as six bouts to get to the finals. I don’t think our coach, being alone, can perform both duties during the fight,” said Romasanta.

Under the Philippine Incentives Act, a gold medal in the Olympics is worth P10 million in cash incentives, a silver medal P5 million and a bronze P2 million.


Table tennis player Ian Lariba

“It can serve as a motivation,” said Ladon, who has made some heads turn during the last Asian Championships and World Championships. With his relentless style, he has drawn the attention of his top rivals.

“But you need to focus on the fights. The medal and incentives will come afterwards,” said Ladon in Filipino.

With the arrival of the two boxers, only three members of the Philippine team haven't checked in here. They are hurdler Eric Cray who will fly in from Houston, marathoner Mary Joy Tabal who will come in from Japan, and golfer Miguel Tabuena, still in Thailand competing in the King’s Cup.

The seven Pinoy athletes who are in Rio since last Sunday are just making sure that stay in tip-top shape – from swimmers Jasmine Alkhaldi and Jessie King Lacuna, weightlfters Hidilyn Diaz and Nestor Colonia, taekwondo’s Kirstie Elaine Alora, long jumper Marestella Torres-Sunang and table tennis’ Ian Lariba, the flag bearer.

Looking over the athletes here in Rio are Philippine Olympic Committee officials Col. Jeff Tamayo and Julian Camacho, and administrative offers Liza Ner of the POC and Merly Ibay of the Philippine Sports Commission.


PHILSTAR

If Jinkee Pacquiao had her way, no more boxing for Manny SHARES: 117 VIEW COMMENTS By: Mark Giongco @MGiongcoINQ INQUIRER.net 05:05 PM July 28th, 2016


Jinkee Pacquiao with daughters Princess and Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave a restaurant after having lunch in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, 26 April 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA

Jinkee Pacquiao with daughters Princess and Queen Elizabeth prepares to leave a restaurant after having lunch in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, 26 April 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA

If Jinkee Pacquiao had her way, boxing had already seen the last of Manny Pacquiao.

But that doesn’t seem to be the case as boxing’s only eight-division world champion is leaning towards a ring return later in the year just three months since announcing his retirement.

“Advice ko, kung ako, sana wala na,” Jinkee told reporters Wednesday. “Sa akin lang ha. Hindi naman ako magagalit. Suggestion ko lang yon sa kanya.”

Jinkee accompanied Manny to Mahindra’s game against San Miguel Beer in the PBA at Smart Araneta Coliseum where the Enforcer eked out a 105-103 win, the team’s third in as many games.

READ: With Senate session suspended, Pacquiao attends PBA game

The two may not share the same sentiment when it comes to Manny’s potential return possibly in November, but Jinkee isn’t going to keep her husband away from his passion.

“Maiintindihan ko naman kung gusto talaga niya. Siguro nami-miss niya mag-practice, siguro hinahanap din ng katawan niya pero okay lang naman kung gusto niya.”

----------------------------------

IRELATED FROM THE NQUIRER

Pacquiao: Boxing is how I help my family By: Mark Giongco @MGiongcoINQ INQUIRER.net
09:48 PM July 27th, 2016


Manny Pacquiao during the post-fight press conference of Pacquiao-Bradley 3 at MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Pacquiao beat Timothy Bradley via unanimous decision. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA

Manny Pacquiao during the post-fight press conference of Pacquiao-Bradley 3 at MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Pacquiao beat Timothy Bradley via unanimous decision. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA

It’s only been three months since Manny Pacquiao announced his retirement, but that is long enough for him to miss the sport that made him who he is now.

As boxing’s only eight-division world champion, Pacquiao doesn’t have anything left to prove in the ring.

But the former pound-for-pound king needed only a few reasons why he will eventually make a comeback before the year ends.

“Para sa akin, unang-una, aaminin ko, boxing is my passion, dyan talaga ako lumaki, hilig ko talaga yan,” the 37-year-old Pacquiao told reporters on Wednesday when asked why he decided to come out of retirement.

“Nami-miss ko ang boxing and pangalawa, karangalan ko na makapagbigay ng honor sa ating bansa and boxing is my vocation,” added Pacquiao, who attended Mahindra’s 105-103 win over San Miguel Beer in the 2016 PBA Governors’ Cup. “Boxing is my profession kung saan ko tinutulungan ang pamilya ko.”

READ MORE...

Pacquiao said boxing is his way to cater to his and his family’s financial needs, assuring that he has no plans to make money as a politician.

He also reiterated that his boxing career won’t interfere with his duty as senator as he is determined to be present in Congress sessions after being labeled as one of the top absentees in 2014 back when he was still a Representative of Sarangani.

“Sa pagseserbisyo ko wala naman akong balak magnakaw diyan. In fact, sarili kong pera ginagastos ko para makatulong ako sa ating mga kababayan na mahirap. Ayan lang ang hanapbuhay ko,” he said.

“Basta hindi maaapektuhan ang trabaho ko, yan ang sinisigurado ko na ayaw kong maaapektuhan ang pagtatrabaho ko at pagseserbisyo ko sa taong bayan. In the meantime, kumikita ako para sa pamilya ko at ayokong gawing livelihood ang pagseserbisyo ko because I believe government is a public service not our personal business.”


INQUIRER

Pacquiao can fight, but only between Senate rounds By: Tarra Quismundo @TarraINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer 06:00 AM July 22nd, 2016


Senator Manny Pacquiao faces the media be JULLIANE LOVE DE JESUS/INQUIRER.net FILE PHOTO

As long as he could perform his duties as legislator, Sen. Manny “Pacman” Pacquiao may go back to the boxing ring.

Senate President Franklin Drilon yesterday expressed his support for Pacquiao’s reported plan to go back to boxing, confirming for the first time that the newly-elected senator had sought his permission to fight again.

“He asked me if he can box. I said ‘there’s nothing to prevent you, but you can do it in a manner that will not interfere with your job as a senator because you will be severely criticized.’ And so I said ‘you can box during the break,” said Drilon of the lawmaker in a Senate forum yesterday.

Pacquiao was notoriously absent during his stint as Sarangani representative in the last Congress.

The schedule of the 17th Congress has yet to be finalized, but the Senate usually takes a brief break between October and November. Pacquiao usually trains for eight weeks for his bouts.

Pacquiao’s promoter Bob Arum had said last week that the boxer-turned-politician, also an international product endorser, businessman, playing basketball coach and occasional actor and recording artist, was planning a return bout sometime in November.

The senator, who attended a single session of Congress and had 16 absences “without notice” in the final session of the 16th Congress, then denied that he was planning to take a leave from the Senate just so he could fight.

In a statement, he said “my priority is my legislative work,” backing up his earlier vow to score a “perfect attendance” in his foray into the national legislature.

READ MORE...

He said he would time his future bout—if ever he decides to fight again —while Congress is on recess so he won’t have to disrupt his legislative work.

Drilon said he would hold Pacquiao to his promise, adding that a senator with any other profession may pursue his or her job while being a member of Congress.

“I am a lawyer, I can exercise my profession as a lawyer. A businessman can continue running his or her business while being a member of the legislature. An entertainer can continue his or her profession while being a member of Congress. Why should we impose a different standard on a professional boxer?” he said.

However, he vowed to be the first one to call Pacquiao out if he fails to deliver on his promise.

“I hold him to his commitment that it will not be at the price of neglecting his duty as a senator. I’d be the first one to criticize him if he does that. But I will support his decision to exercise his profession,” Drilon said.

 


INQUIRER

Pacquiao could take on Crawford, but … By: Roy A. Luarca @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer
01:31 AM July 26th, 2016


Manny Pacquiao during the final press conference at the David Copperfield Theater inside MGM Hotel in Las Vegas, April 6, 2016. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA

IF PLANS pitting Manny Pacquiao and Terence Crawford on Nov. 5 pushes through, the Filipino legend will have to shed more weight than he’s used to.

After beating Ukrainian Viktor Postol by unanimous decision in Las Vegas Saturday night (Sunday in Manila), Crawford announced that he intends to stay as king of the light welterweight division.

Pacquiao has fought as a welterweight (147 lb) since 2012, including his “farewell victory” over Timothy Bradley on April 9.

The last time the Pacquiao fought at 140 was when he beat Bradley for the International Boxing Organization crown.

Even promoter Bob Arum, who had anointed the winner between Crawford and Postol, along with WBO welterweight titlist Jessie Vargas, as Pacquiao’s likely foe in his comeback fight, turned silent on the likelihood of a Pacquiao-Crawford, confounding American boxing analysts.

Pacquiao, a bloated welterweight, claims that he can still make 135 lb if he wants to.

Postol served as Pacquiao’s chief sparring partner in the course of his preparations for American Chris Algieri in 2014 in Macau. Pacquiao sent Algieri to the canvas six times.

If Roach deems it unwise for 37-year-old Pacquiao to fight 28-year-old Crawford at 140, there’s still a chance for a catch weight at 144 (Pacquiao-Juan Manuel Marquez 3).

The lure of making at least $6 million against Pacquiao, which is way beyond the $1.3M he made against Postol, may yet prove to be irresistible for Crawford.

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Roach doesn't want Pacquiao to fight Crawford soon By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated July 28, 2016 - 12:55pm 3 412 googleplus0 0


Manny Pacquiao and Terence Crawford

MANILA, Philippines – Freddie Roach has admitted that rising star Terence Crawford presents a tough challenge for Manny Pacquiao right now.

The multi-titled trainer believes the undefeated Crawford would be difficult to beat that he does not want Pacquiao to face him any time soon.

Roach personally witnessed Crawford’s mettle when the latter dominated Viktor Postol in their super lightweight title unification bout last Sunday in Las Vegas.

The bespectacled trainer worked the corner of Postol – who interestingly was a former sparring partner of Pacquiao – and saw him get outwitted and outpunched by Crawford.

The Omaha, Nebraska-based boxer floored Postol twice in the fifth round en route to a lopsided decision victory to become the WBC and WBO super lightweight champion.

Based on what he saw, Roach thinks Pacquiao won’t have an easy time with Crawford.

“It [Pacquiao-Crawford fight]’s a very tough matchup,” Roach recently told Steve Kim of boxingscene.com.

“Crawford showed that he can move for twelve rounds, he can run for twelve rounds. But you know, in between the running and so forth, when he does land punches he does land really powerful punches. He hurt my guy a lot. I know Postol's got a pretty good chin,” he added.

Pacquiao will reportedly fight again on November 5 in Las Vegas, and Crawford – also a Top Rank fighter – heads the list of potential opponents for the Filipino icon.

But Roach isn’t receptive to the thought of his prized ward testing Crawford, whom he even likened to Floyd Mayweather Jr., the last fighter to convincingly defeat Pacquiao.

“So Crawford's a pretty good puncher, he hits hard and he moves very well and emulates (Floyd) Mayweather quite a bit, I think. I think he's like a young Mayweather, right now,” Roach continued.

If he would have his way, Roach said he wants Pacquiao to take interim fights before facing Crawford.

“You know what, with Manny in the senate and I have to go to the Philippines and so forth to train him and with all the confusion going on – I don't think I'm going to accept that fight or want that fight right away,” he said.

“I mean, give me one warm-up fight and give me a fight right after that and we can talk.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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