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SPORTS NEWS THE PAST WEEKS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

BOXING BY JOAQUIN HENSON: NO HARD FEELING


APRIL 28 -Manny Pacquiao, since losing his first fight against Rustico Torrecampo in 1996, has lost after every 16 fights. The congressman's last loss was against Erik Morales in 2005, and his match against Timothy Bradley is the 16th fight after that loss. Only seven fighters can boast of having put boxing legend Manny Pacquiao on the canvas. The first to do it was Rustico Torrecampo who halted Pacquiao in the third round in Mandaluyong in 1996. Pacquiao scaled over the weight limit for the fight and was penalized by wearing bigger gloves, softening the impact of his punches to compensate for his excess poundage. The second was Medgeon 3-K Battery who stopped a dehydrated Pacquiao with a body shot in the third round of a WBC flyweight title fight in Thailand. Once again, Pacquiao failed to make the weight limit and was stripped of the crown on the scales. The match went on just the same with the title awarded to Medgeon if he won and the throne declared vacant if Pacquiao won. Pacquiao was so drained that he would’ve fallen from a glancing blow and that’s exactly what happened as he avoided a battering. The third was Australia’s Nedal Hussein who floored Pacquiao with a vicious left to the jaw in the fourth round at the Ynares Center in Antipolo in 2000. Referee Carlos (Sonny) Padilla did everything he could legally do to delay the proceedings and give Pacquiao a few more seconds to clear the cobwebs in his head. Hussein’s cornerman Jeff Fenech, a former world champion, howled in protest over Padilla’s tactics. But Padilla, who worked the Thrilla In Manila between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier in 1975, was unperturbed. A long count saved Pacquiao who went on to stop Hussein in the 10th round on cuts. Last Saturday, Hussein’s brother Billy was in Cebu City to work unbeaten Australian Paul Fleming’s corner against Mexico’s Miguel Angel Gonzalez in the Nonito Donaire-Zsolt Bedak undercard. ‘Billy said he was in Antipolo when Pacquiao got a lift from Padilla. “Yeah, it was a long count but that’s boxing,” he said. “We’re all good now. No hard feelings. We’ve moved on. My brothers (Nedal and Hussy) and I are huge Pacquiao fans. (ALA trainer) Edito (Villamor) is my good friend.” Billy was an amateur fighter who never turned pro. Instead, he trained his brothers. Nedal, now 38, campaigned from 1997 to 2007 and finished his career with a 43-5 record, including 27 KOs. He was once the WBU superbantamweight champion but never held the crown of a major governing body despite two challenges. Hussy, 40, fought as a pro from 1998 to 2008 and lost to Mexico’s Jorge Arce on a second round stoppage for the interim WBC flyweight crown in Las Vegas in 2005. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Bill Velasco in Cebu - Boxing revelations


APRIL 25 -Donaire blows out Bedak in 3 rounds CEBU CITY, Philippines – WBO superbantamweight champion Nonito Donaire Jr.’s homecoming capped a long, exciting night of boxing at a warm, packed Cebu City Sports Complex. Seven of the nine bouts on the partnership between cards ended with knockouts, capped with a sensational third-round stoppage of Hungarian challenger Zsolt Bedak. Bedak had fought four times in 2013 and four times in 2014. He was inactive from May 2010 to March 2013, “after the loss to Wilfredo Vasquez Jr. in Puerto Rico in his only world title fight. The Hungarian’s last fight was against Nick Otieno, which was a decent victory, if not for the fact that Otieno has lost to three quality Filipino fighters in Genesis Servania (2012), Rexon Flores (on whom Otieno fell by TKO in 2008) and Z Gorres. The 5’4” challenger calls himself “Mr. Left Hook”. But against Donaire, the irony of that moniker would be greatly pronounced. The champion Donaire had fought in four different countries in his last four fights: Puerto Rico, Macao, the Philippines and the US. His last loss was via a chastening TKO at the hands of Nicholas Walters at the StubHub Center in California in October of 2014. From then on, the Filipino Flash made the strategic move to stay in the 122-pound class, where he is most comfortable. The move to have the fight in the Philippines (initially in Metro Manila then Cebu) was accompanied by an impressive rededication to his craft. And the audience in his native southern Philippines was immediate and overwhelming. READ MORE...

ALSO: Pacquiao presses senatorial campaign despite kidnap threat


april 14 -BULLIT MARQUEZ Associated Press April 28, 2016
FILE - In this Thursday, April 14, 2016 file photo, Filipino boxer and Congressman Manny Pacquiao smiles as he answers questions from reporters upon his arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines, after beating American Timothy Bradley during their WBO welterweight title boxing match in Las Vegas. Pacquiao pressed on with his campaign for a seat in the Philippine Senate on Thursday, April 28, barnstorming in a province, south of Manila, despite a reported militant plot to kidnap him. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File) SAN PABLO, Philippines (AP) — Boxing star Manny Pacquiao pressed on with his campaign for a seat in the Philippine Senate on Thursday, barnstorming in a province south of Manila despite a reported militant plot to kidnap him. Pacquiao had few visible security escorts as he campaigned in Laguna province, shaking hands and allowing mobs of villagers to take selfies with him. President Benigno Aquino III had revealed Wednesday that Abu Sayyaf militants may have plotted against his life and considered kidnapping Pacquiao and the president's sister, who is a popular actress. The 37-year-old Pacquiao, currently a congressman and among the wealthiest sports celebrities in the world, said the intelligence report about the alleged kidnap plot should have been given to him confidentially instead of being announced publicly. "I doubt (the threat) but I'm not ignoring it," he told reporters. The latest voter preference surveys ahead of May 9 elections show Pacquiao has a strong chance of landing a Senate seat despite a considerable dip in his ratings weeks ago over a remark which gay and lesbian groups detested. The Bible-quoting Pacquiao got embroiled in controversy in February for saying that people in same-sex relations are "worse than animals." He apologized to people hurt by his comments but made clear he opposed same-sex marriage. The eight-division champion is the Philippines' most famous athlete. He has represented southern Sarangani province in the Philippines' House of Representatives since May 2010, though he has drawn criticism for seldom showing up for legislative duties. full report

ALSO: Pacquiao moves to heavyweight class


april 30 -Boxing champion Manny Pacquiao speaks during a press conference with Vice President Jejomar Binay in Sarangani on April 19. YUJI GONZALES/INQUIRER.net
SAN PABLO CITY—Boxing legend Manny Pacquiao smiles as he soaks up the sounds of adoring fans screaming his name, their cheers heralding a new career as one of the Philippines’ most powerful politicians.
After winning his farewell fight against Timothy Bradley, the eight-time world champion hit the campaign trail this week in a bid to secure a seat in the Senate when Filipinos go to the polls on May 9. Pacquiao’s rise from desperate street kid to world-boxing superstar has made him one of the nation’s biggest heroes and, in a nation where celebrities often become lawmakers, he is effortlessly translating sporting success into the political ring. Surveys show Pacquiao is virtually guaranteed to win a Senate seat and his journey through shantytowns near Manila, where he threw caps and other souvenirs to joyous fans holding life-size posters of him, appeared more a victory lap than an effort to convince skeptical voters. “I’m happy campaigning right now. So many people are shouting, cheering for me. I’m glad with the warm welcome in every rally. I really didn’t expect that,” Pacquiao told Agence France-Presse (AFP) on Thursday during a break from the festivities. With constant speculations that another megabucks bout against American rival Floyd Mayweather Jr. might lure him out of retirement, Pacquiao insisted he was enjoying “retired life” and that he was not thinking about boxing at all. “I’m now a full-time politician. I remember when I dedicated myself to be a boxer and become a champion. It’s my feeling right now,” he said. Pacquiao, who has served two terms as a congressman, is running for a seat in the 24-member Senate as part of a long-term strategy to become President, a not unrealistic ambition given his wild popularity. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Recah Trinidad - So who’ll care for Philippine sports?


APRIL 28 -WE WILL be facing what promises to be the worst sporting era under the next administration. The Philippines has remained a dominant doormat in the Southeast Asian Games under the administration of President Noynoy Aquino. This means we cannot afford to slip further, finish any lower in the biennial competition among the youths of the Asean region.
* * * Too bad, cried veteran sportswriter Eddie Alinea, that there was not even a single mention about poor Philippine sports as the presidential debates for the next national elections wound up in Dagupan City over the weekend. They didn’t even have to promise anything, wrote Alinea in his column for PhilBoxing.com yesterday, they just have to show signs that something would be done for Philippine sports. Alinea added this means the next national leader could just be as unmindful, uncaring about sports development in the country as the outgoing one. * * * A pity, because, as stated in the national charter, it’s the duty of a national leader to care for and attend to the well-being of the citizenry, mainly the youth. Alinea cited an article under the principle and state policies which says: “The state recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation-building and shall promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual, and social well-being.” Going to specifics, Alinea cited Article XIV, Section 19 of the Constitution: “The State shall promote physical education and encourage sports programs, league competitions, and amateur sports, including training for international competitions, to foster self-discipline, teamwork, and excellence, for the development of a healthy and alert citizenry.” * * * “Kulelat na naman ang Atletang Pilipino,” Alinea cried, noting how the Philippines finished sixth in last year’s SEA Games in Singapore; after having slipped to seventh in 2013, its worst since joining the biennial meet in 1977. The SEA Games, which host Philippines topped in 2005, is considered the lowliest sports competition in the Asian region. Lowliest among the lowly, noted Alinea, the Philippines as dominant doormat. THE FULL COLUMN.


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

No hard feelings


Manny Pacquiao, since losing his first fight against Rustico Torrecampo in 1996, has lost after every 16 fights. The congressman's last loss was against Erik Morales in 2005, and his match against Timothy Bradley is the 16th fight after that loss.

MANILA, MAY 2, 2016 (PHILSTAR)  SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated April 27, 2016 - Only seven fighters can boast of having put boxing legend Manny Pacquiao on the canvas.

The first to do it was Rustico Torrecampo who halted Pacquiao in the third round in Mandaluyong in 1996. Pacquiao scaled over the weight limit for the fight and was penalized by wearing bigger gloves, softening the impact of his punches to compensate for his excess poundage.

The second was Medgeon 3-K Battery who stopped a dehydrated Pacquiao with a body shot in the third round of a WBC flyweight title fight in Thailand. Once again, Pacquiao failed to make the weight limit and was stripped of the crown on the scales.

The match went on just the same with the title awarded to Medgeon if he won and the throne declared vacant if Pacquiao won. Pacquiao was so drained that he would’ve fallen from a glancing blow and that’s exactly what happened as he avoided a battering.

The third was Australia’s Nedal Hussein who floored Pacquiao with a vicious left to the jaw in the fourth round at the Ynares Center in Antipolo in 2000.

Referee Carlos (Sonny) Padilla did everything he could legally do to delay the proceedings and give Pacquiao a few more seconds to clear the cobwebs in his head. Hussein’s cornerman Jeff Fenech, a former world champion, howled in protest over Padilla’s tactics. But Padilla, who worked the Thrilla In Manila between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier in 1975, was unperturbed. A long count saved Pacquiao who went on to stop Hussein in the 10th round on cuts.


champ vs hussein News -REFEREE WAS CARLOS PADILLA, JR. – THE GREATEST FILIPINO INTERNATIONAL REFEREE, FROM PHILBOXING.COM

Last Saturday, Hussein’s brother Billy was in Cebu City to work unbeaten Australian Paul Fleming’s corner against Mexico’s Miguel Angel Gonzalez in the Nonito Donaire-Zsolt Bedak undercard.

‘Billy said he was in Antipolo when Pacquiao got a lift from Padilla. “Yeah, it was a long count but that’s boxing,” he said. “We’re all good now. No hard feelings. We’ve moved on. My brothers (Nedal and Hussy) and I are huge Pacquiao fans. (ALA trainer) Edito (Villamor) is my good friend.”

Billy was an amateur fighter who never turned pro. Instead, he trained his brothers. Nedal, now 38, campaigned from 1997 to 2007 and finished his career with a 43-5 record, including 27 KOs. He was once the WBU superbantamweight champion but never held the crown of a major governing body despite two challenges. Hussy, 40, fought as a pro from 1998 to 2008 and lost to Mexico’s Jorge Arce on a second round stoppage for the interim WBC flyweight crown in Las Vegas in 2005.

READ MORE...

“We’ve got the biggest boxing stable in Australia,” he said. “Right now, we’re training 14 pros, including former world champion Billy Dib. We operate two Bodypunch boxing gyms in Sydney. One of our top boxers is Fleming.”

The fourth was Kazakhstan’s Serikzhan Yeshmegambetov who decked Pacquiao in the fourth round at the Quirino Grandstand in Luneta Park in 2003. Pacquiao floored the Kazakh in the first round and toyed with him when he got careless and took a shot on the chin. Pacquiao recovered to dispose of Yeshmegambetov in the fifth.

The fifth was Mexico’s Marco Antonio Barrera who scored a first round knockdown in San Antonio, also in 2003. It was actually a slip but referee Laurence Cole gave Pacquiao a mandatory eight-count. Pacquiao downed Barrera twice, once in the third round, before Cole stepped in with four seconds left to end the 11th. At the time of the stoppage, Pacquiao led on the three judges scorecards, 97-90, 97-90, 97-89. The win earned for Pacquiao recognition as the lineal and Ring Magazine featherweight champion.

The sixth was Sugar Shane Mosley who was credited with an undeserved knockdown in the 10th round in Las Vegas in 2011. Mosley, floored by Pacquiao in the third, pushed the Filipino to the deck and referee Kenny Bayless ruled it a knockdown. Pacquiao got up quickly and was clearly unhurt.

A video replay on the giant screen at the venue showed it was a push and not a knockdown, drawing a chorus of boos from the spectators in reaction to Bayless’ call. Bayless later apologized for the mistake. Pacquiao defeated Mosley by a mile, 119-108, 120-107, 120-108. The judges disregarded Bayless’ knockdown call and none gave Mosley a 10-8 round.

Finally, the last man to put Pacquiao on the floor was Mexico’s Juan Manuel Marquez in Las Vegas in 2012. Marquez decked Pacquiao with a long right straight in the third then finished him off with a counter right hook with a second to go in the sixth. Pacquiao was ahead on the judges scorecards, 47-46 thrice, when tragedy struck. Marquez was floored in the fifth and on his way to a knockout defeat when he landed a lights-out shot on Pacquiao.


PHILSTAR

Boxing revelations THE GAME OF MY LIFE By Bill Velasco (The Philippine Star) | Updated April 25, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


Donaire blows out Bedak in 3 rounds

CEBU CITY, Philippines – WBO superbantamweight champion Nonito Donaire Jr.’s homecoming capped a long, exciting night of boxing at a warm, packed Cebu City Sports Complex.

Seven of the nine bouts on the partnership between cards ended with knockouts, capped with a sensational third-round stoppage of Hungarian challenger Zsolt Bedak.

Bedak had fought four times in 2013 and four times in 2014. He was inactive from May 2010 to March 2013, “after the loss to Wilfredo Vasquez Jr. in Puerto Rico in his only world title fight. The Hungarian’s last fight was against Nick Otieno, which was a decent victory, if not for the fact that Otieno has lost to three quality Filipino fighters in Genesis Servania (2012), Rexon Flores (on whom Otieno fell by TKO in 2008) and Z Gorres. The 5’4” challenger calls himself “Mr. Left Hook”. But against Donaire, the irony of that moniker would be greatly pronounced.

The champion Donaire had fought in four different countries in his last four fights: Puerto Rico, Macao, the Philippines and the US. His last loss was via a chastening TKO at the hands of Nicholas Walters at the StubHub Center in California in October of 2014. From then on, the Filipino Flash made the strategic move to stay in the 122-pound class, where he is most comfortable. The move to have the fight in the Philippines (initially in Metro Manila then Cebu) was accompanied by an impressive rededication to his craft. And the audience in his native southern Philippines was immediate and overwhelming.

READ MORE...

Early on, you could tell the difference. Donaire had a grim determination that was rarely seen after his banner year of 2012. In fact, after the fight, he admitted avoiding eye contact with the fans, lest their expectant smiles add to the pressure he was feeling. Nonito was at the venue every night in Cebu. Getting a feel for the heat and humidity which would be his ally against Bedak, who had only been outside Europe once in his pro career. The champion needed to make a loud statement, and he was hell-bent on making it in front of his countrymen.

At the outset, the difference in power was obvious. The diminutive Bedak was being walloped around by his host, with a devastating left hook that bounced him from pillar to post. In the second round, the crowd jumped to its feet, as Donaire sent Bedak to the canvas twice with that overpowering left. Midway through the third round, you could sense that the end was near. Bedak fell in a neutral corner. Referee Russell Mora, flown in from Las Vegas expressly for the occasion, had to ask Bedak twice if he was okay. After the dazed challenger responded, Mora followed up, asking him “What do you see? What do you see?” When the Hungarian was unresponsive, Mora waved the fight off.


Nonito Donaire scores third-round TKO win over Zsolt Bedak to retain WBO title belt

An emotional Donaire grabbed the microphone and thanked the crowd in Cebuano. He thanked his countrymen for loving boxing and supporting him, saying he only wanted to do them proud. Donaire Sr. said it was Bedak’s own fault for engaging his son in a brawl, thinking he could spring a surprise. The Hungarian Olympian’s 10-fight winning streak thus came to an abrupt end earlier than expected, and Donaire kept his promise to his father that he would go for a knockout in the first half of the fight.

Another big development was the breakthrough victory of Mark “Magnifico” Magsayo. The scary test for the undefeated 20-year-old came at the hands of the versatile Chris Avalos. Avalos had previously fought for the IBF superbantamweight, but lost to champion Carl Frampton, a potential next target for Donaire. Abalos floored Magsayo in third round, but the youngster got up and recovered. Tightening up his defense, Magsayo got his revenge, almost ending the fight at the end of the fifth round with a vicious barrage of left hooks. The assault continued into the next round, and Avalos could take no more.

Honorable mention goes to 19-year-old Jeo “Santino” Santisima, who marched on to his eighth consecutive KO win and 10th victory in 12 fights. Santisima made short work of Thai opponent Tabtong Tor Buamas, dismissing the visitor before he had barely broken into a sweat. The sweet win pumped up the crowd of more than 15,000 who had endured the heat and gotten rewarded with hours of breathtaking boxing. Filipino boxing makes the next big leap out into the rest of the world.


YAHOO NEWS ASIA

Pacquiao presses senatorial campaign despite kidnap threat FILE - In this Thursday, April 14, 2016 file photo


BULLIT MARQUEZ Associated Press April 28, 2016

Filipino boxer and Congressman Manny Pacquiao smiles as he answers questions from reporters upon his arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines, after beating American Timothy Bradley during their WBO welterweight title boxing match in Las Vegas. Pacquiao pressed on with his campaign for a seat in the Philippine Senate on Thursday, April 28, barnstorming in a province, south of Manila, despite a reported militant plot to kidnap him. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File)
More
SAN PABLO, Philippines (AP) — Boxing star Manny Pacquiao pressed on with his campaign for a seat in the Philippine Senate on Thursday, barnstorming in a province south of Manila despite a reported militant plot to kidnap him.

Pacquiao had few visible security escorts as he campaigned in Laguna province, shaking hands and allowing mobs of villagers to take selfies with him.

President Benigno Aquino III had revealed Wednesday that Abu Sayyaf militants may have plotted against his life and considered kidnapping Pacquiao and the president's sister, who is a popular actress.

The 37-year-old Pacquiao, currently a congressman and among the wealthiest sports celebrities in the world, said the intelligence report about the alleged kidnap plot should have been given to him confidentially instead of being announced publicly.

"I doubt (the threat) but I'm not ignoring it," he told reporters.

The latest voter preference surveys ahead of May 9 elections show Pacquiao has a strong chance of landing a Senate seat despite a considerable dip in his ratings weeks ago over a remark which gay and lesbian groups detested.

The Bible-quoting Pacquiao got embroiled in controversy in February for saying that people in same-sex relations are "worse than animals." He apologized to people hurt by his comments but made clear he opposed same-sex marriage.

The eight-division champion is the Philippines' most famous athlete. He has represented southern Sarangani province in the Philippines' House of Representatives since May 2010, though he has drawn criticism for seldom showing up for legislative duties.


INQUIRER

Pacquiao moves to heavyweight class SHARES: 723 VIEW COMMENTS @inquirerdotnet Agence France-Presse 01:15 AM April 30th, 2016


Boxing champion Manny Pacquiao speaks during a press conference with Vice President Jejomar Binay in Sarangani on April 19. YUJI GONZALES/INQUIRER.net

SAN PABLO CITY—Boxing legend Manny Pacquiao smiles as he soaks up the sounds of adoring fans screaming his name, their cheers heralding a new career as one of the Philippines’ most powerful politicians.

After winning his farewell fight against Timothy Bradley, the eight-time world champion hit the campaign trail this week in a bid to secure a seat in the Senate when Filipinos go to the polls on May 9.

Pacquiao’s rise from desperate street kid to world-boxing superstar has made him one of the nation’s biggest heroes and, in a nation where celebrities often become lawmakers, he is effortlessly translating sporting success into the political ring.

Surveys show Pacquiao is virtually guaranteed to win a Senate seat and his journey through shantytowns near Manila, where he threw caps and other souvenirs to joyous fans holding life-size posters of him, appeared more a victory lap than an effort to convince skeptical voters.

“I’m happy campaigning right now. So many people are shouting, cheering for me. I’m glad with the warm welcome in every rally. I really didn’t expect that,” Pacquiao told Agence France-Presse (AFP) on Thursday during a break from the festivities.

With constant speculations that another megabucks bout against American rival Floyd Mayweather Jr. might lure him out of retirement, Pacquiao insisted he was enjoying “retired life” and that he was not thinking about boxing at all.

“I’m now a full-time politician. I remember when I dedicated myself to be a boxer and become a champion. It’s my feeling right now,” he said.

Pacquiao, who has served two terms as a congressman, is running for a seat in the 24-member Senate as part of a long-term strategy to become President, a not unrealistic ambition given his wild popularity.

READ MORE...

Pacquiao’s international reputation took a huge hit in February when the devout evangelical Christian described homosexuals as “worse than animals.”

READ: Abunda to Pacquiao: Who are you to judge me as someone worse than an animal? / Pacquiao likens gays to animals, draws flak

Major sponsor Nike immediately canceled its partnership with him and a host of US celebrities voiced outrage.

But the comments had far less impact in the Philippines, with surveys showing his popularity slumping only slightly afterward then quickly recovering.

Boosted by his success against Bradley this month, Pacquiao is now in third place in the Senate race and a near certainty to take one of the 12 seats available, according to the latest survey from a major pollster.

READ: Pacquiao slugs his way to No. 3 in senatorial poll

Campaigning in the bustling city of San Pablo on Thursday, there was no sign of rancor. Vendors and tricycle drivers mobbed Pacquiao as he got off a flatbed truck, eager to touch their hero and pose for selfies.

Message for the poor

A high school dropout, Pacquiao entered boxing to feed his family, and he says his political ambitions are anchored in his desire to help the poor.

He is promising to increase the salaries of teachers, offer scholarships to poor students and give subsidies to farmers, selling himself as a beacon of hope for millions of poor who have not felt the benefits of stellar economic growth under President Aquino.

“I tell them not to be discouraged because our life was worse than theirs. We did not have our own house, our own land and sometimes even food,” Pacquiao said.

“I experienced what it was like to sleep on the streets. I want to serve so they will be proud that Manny is for the poor.” Many in San Pablo said they were drawn to Pacquiao’s message, as they talked about their own hardships.

“I hope he gives projects for noncollege graduates,” said housewife Jessica Bautista, 29, who only finished grade school.

“I hope we get training because the government and companies only prioritize graduates but we have no diploma,” Bautista’s husband, Julius, a tricycle driver, said he also supported Pacquiao.

“He is already rich so he will not be corrupt. I hope he just gives his salary to the poor,” he said.

Answering his critics, who say he is not fit to be a senator because he has little education or track record as an effective lawmaker, Pacquiao insisted his rags-to-riches story was enough to qualify him for the job.

“God raised me from nothing into something. I think I am the right person, the best person to answer the poor,” he said. TVJ


inquirer commentary

So who’ll care for Philippine sports? SHARES: New VIEW COMMENTS By: Recah Trinidad @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 10:23 PM April 27th, 2016

WE WILL be facing what promises to be the worst sporting era under the next administration.

The Philippines has remained a dominant doormat in the Southeast Asian Games under the administration of President Noynoy Aquino.

This means we cannot afford to slip further, finish any lower in the biennial competition among the youths of the Asean region.

* * *

Too bad, cried veteran sportswriter Eddie Alinea, that there was not even a single mention about poor Philippine sports as the presidential debates for the next national elections wound up in Dagupan City over the weekend.

They didn’t even have to promise anything, wrote Alinea in his column for PhilBoxing.com yesterday, they just have to show signs that something would be done for Philippine sports.

Alinea added this means the next national leader could just be as unmindful, uncaring about sports development in the country as the outgoing one.

* * *

A pity, because, as stated in the national charter, it’s the duty of a national leader to care for and attend to the well-being of the citizenry, mainly the youth.

Alinea cited an article under the principle and state policies which says: “The state recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation-building and shall promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual, and social well-being.”

Going to specifics, Alinea cited Article XIV, Section 19 of the Constitution: “The State shall promote physical education and encourage sports programs, league competitions, and amateur sports, including training for international competitions, to foster self-discipline, teamwork, and excellence, for the development of a healthy and alert citizenry.”

* * *

“Kulelat na naman ang Atletang Pilipino,” Alinea cried, noting how the Philippines finished sixth in last year’s SEA Games in Singapore; after having slipped to seventh in 2013, its worst since joining the biennial meet in 1977.

The SEA Games, which host Philippines topped in 2005, is considered the lowliest sports competition in the Asian region.

Lowliest among the lowly, noted Alinea, the Philippines as dominant doormat.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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