SPORTS NEWS THE WEEK AFTER
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

MAYWEATHER-PACQUIAO BOUT, RICHEST IN HISTORY, ATTRACTS RECORD 4.4M PPV BUYS


MAY 13 ---In this May 2, 2015 file photo, Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, hits Manny Pacquiao, from the Philippines, during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas. The broadcast of fight was marred by technical snafus and got sucker punched by Internet streamers, exposing the industry’s vulnerabilities. AP Photo/John Locher, File
- It’s official: The super fight between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao is the richest and most viewed boxing match in history. The fight held last May 3 generated more than 4.4 million pay-per-view buys and over $400 million in revenue, shattering the previous record to become the highest-grossing PPV of all time. Organizers said the fight’s total income could even go over $500 million once revenues from other sources – such as from the live gate at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, international television distribution, sponsorships, closed circuit and merchandise sales – come in. The news was announced jointly by Showtime Networks Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, and HBO in conjunction with event promoters Mayweather Promotions and Top Rank, Inc. The welterweight world championship unification bout nearly doubled the previous record of 2.48 million buys generated by the Oscar De La Hoya- Mayweather fight in 2007 and almost tripled the record $150 million in US PPV revenue made by the Mayweather-Canelo Alvarez bout in 2013. READ MORE...

ALSO: Nation welcomes people’s champ


Manny and Jinkee Pacquiao and their children before leaving for home. instagram.com/jinkeepacquiao
- Ten days after his gallant stand against Floyd Mayweather Jr., Filipino boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao finally comes home to a hero’s welcome today. The Philippine Airlines jumbo jet carrying Pacquiao and his family from Los Angeles is expected to land at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport at 5 a.m. After a brief press conference at the NAIA Terminal 2 VIP Lounge, Pacquiao will be brought to his hotel in Makati City for breakfast and a brief rest. Then he will be paraded around town as the “People’s Champion.”  A Pacquiao associate said a courtesy call on President Aquino depends on the latter’s schedule for the day. The 36-year-old fighting congressman lost a unanimous decision against Mayweather last May 2 before a sellout crowd of 16,507 at the MGM Grand and a worldwide audience. It was billed as “The Fight of the Century” and early tracking of the pay-per-view sales suggests over five million buys or twice as much as the previous high. As he prepared to leave his Los Angeles home, Pacquiao posed for a picture with his entire family, including wife Jinkee and kids Emmanuel, Michael, Princess, Queenie and Israel. “Preparing for departure back to the Philippines,” said Pacquiao on his Instagram account, his right arm resting on a black sling. READ MORE...

ALSO: Low-key return as injured Pacquiao says retirement ‘near’


Manny Pacquiao thumbs up where MANNY-lanios welcome Manny Pacman Pacquiao led by Manila Mayor Joseph Ejercito Estrada at the Rajah Sulayman Park along Roxas Boulevard in Malate Manila, May 13, 2015. Eight division world champion Manny Pacquiao receive a hero's welcome upon his arrival in Manila. Photo by: Linus Guardian Escandor II 
Manila, Philippines –Manny Pacquiao made a low-key return to the Philippines on Wednesday after losing his mega-fight with Floyd Mayweather and said retirement was drawing closer as he recovers from shoulder surgery. Few signs of Pacquiao’s early-morning arrival were visible at Manila airport, and he was later welcomed by modest crowds as he paraded the capital on the back of a flatbed truck. It was very different from previous joyous homecomings for the eight-weight world champion and congressman, whose fights bring the Southeast Asian country to a standstill. A smiling Pacquiao, his right arm supported by a black sling, told reporters he hadn’t yet decided on his future after his May 2 defeat by unanimous decision in Las Vegas. “I will focus first on healing my shoulder. After that, I will announce continuing my career or announcing retirement,” Pacquiao said. “I’m not saying I am going to retire, but it’s near. I’m already 36, turning 37 this December.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: Is Floyd’s credibility in tatters?


Floyd Mayweather Jr 
Now that the dust is finally settled after the so-called Fight of the Century has gone down in history, undefeated WBC/WBA/IBF welterweight champion Floyd Mayweather reigns virtually supreme in the 147-pound division but is he really The Best Ever as he claims? Is he more credible as a fighter with his win on points over Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas last May 2? Or is he less believable with his pre-fight pronouncements failing to turn into reality?  Mayweather, 38, insists he’s the greatest fighter of all time, belittling the achievements of ring legends Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Robinson and Henry Armstrong. Anticipating a backlash for his boast, he said he couldn’t care less. Mayweather has been described as delusional for his comments with Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield questioning if his 48-0 record is enough basis to support the brash declaration. Defeating Pacquiao has sent Mayweather up in the clouds because it’s widely known that the Filipino had the best chance of any fighter in the horizon to put a stain on the 1996 Olympic bronze medalist’s record. But was Mayweather’s victory all that convincing? At least three judges thought so as Dave Moretti scored it 118-110 while Glenn Feldman and Burt Clements saw it 116-112. Even the Compubox stats reflected who was clearly the superior fighter that night as the numbers showed Mayweather landed 148 of 435 punches compared to Pacquiao’s 81 of 429. Never mind if the figures appeared unusually strange because Pacquiao is supposed to be a volume puncher and Mayweather, less active but more accurate. In this case, the situation was reversed. Was it because Pacquiao fought with an injured right shoulder starting the fourth round? If the shoulder hampered Pacquiao’s ability to throw, why was he the more aggressive fighter until the last bell? READ MORE...

ALSO: I just want to tell the truth, says Pacquiao


FILE – In this May 2, 2015 photo, trainer Freddie Roach, left, listens as Manny Pacquiao answers questions during a press conference following his welterweight title fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. in Las Vegas. Pacquiao could face disciplinary action from Nevada boxing officials for failing to disclose a shoulder injury before the fight. Nevada Athletic Commission Chairman Francisco Aguilar said that the state attorney general's office will look at why Pacquiao checked 'no' a day before the fight on a commission questionnaire asking if he had a shoulder injury. (AP Photo/John Locher)
GENERAL SANTOS CITY—“I’m not a sore loser. I just wanna tell the truth so the people will know.”   This was what eight-division boxing champ and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao said when asked about his reaction to Floyd Mayweather’s statement that he was not interested in a rematch with the Filipino boxer “because he’s a sore loser and he’s a coward.”  The interview was recorded for Showtime on Tuesday and will air Saturday night in the US after the replay of the Pacquiao-Mayweather fight but some of the American boxer’s quotes were released ahead of time. Mayweather also said Pacquiao was “absolutely not” hampered by his shoulder injury. But Pacquiao said he “fought in an uneven playing field where my opponent was in control of everything, inside and outside the ring.”  Pacquiao claimed the fight gave him a chance to know the real Mayweather. “He’s an astute fighter who doesn’t have the so-called sense of fair play,” Pacquiao said. READ MORE...

ALSO (Jinkee stepping down as governor next year): It’s time for Manny to retire


JINKEE - Jinkee Pacquiao is stepping down as vice governor of Sarangani next year and is hoping that Manny Pacquiao will retire from boxing. “My prayer is for Manny to retire. He should retire,” said Jinkee upon their arrival from Los Angeles yesterday morning. Jinkee believes that Pacquiao, who’s turning 37 in December, has nothing more to prove in his 20 years as a professional boxer. He’s the only boxer in history to win world titles in eight different weight classes, and has already brought so much pride and honor to the country. Despite the bitter loss to Floyd Mayweather Jr. May 2 in Las Vegas, Jinkee said her husband can leave the sport with his head held high. “Wala na siya dapat patunayan. He has accomplished everything,” Jinkee told The STAR in a recent interview. READ MORE...

ALSO By Joaquin Henson: Antithesis of sports


Joaquin Henson  You would be unnerved when you hear Floyd Mayweather, Jr. explain his philosophy of sports. He couldn’t care less about how he wins a fight, he’ll do what it takes to bring it home. Who cares if he gets booed? Who cares if the fans get bored? His motivation is money, it’s all about the hard cash. It’s what drives him. Legacy? Mayweather says that can’t buy things. Working smart is better than working hard. He doesn’t mind cutting corners or taking the easy way out for as long as he’s one step ahead of the other guy. Mexican fighter Canelo Alvarez says, “Mayweather’s a fighter that if with three punches he wins the round from you, he’s fine with that … he doesn’t expose anything and give a beautiful fight, he doesn’t care in what way he wins as long as he wins.” Writer Justin Moyer of the Washington Post quotes a source as saying, “While Floyd wins, he does so in an almost boring fashion, he doesn’t usually brawl as crowds want to see, with big punches and fighters standing toe-to-toe in a slugfest, Floyd fights the way Floyd fights and doesn’t let others dictate his style.”   If greed is what defines him, Mayweather has little concern for virtue. He has no qualms in beating up women. A prizefighter’s fists are considered deadly weapons but Mayweather was unrestrained in abusing the mother of three of his four children. The victim was assaulted in front of two of their children and was allegedly treated for a concussion, cuts and bruises. “His history of violence against women has triggered outright revulsion – three convictions, including one that landed him a two-month jail term in 2012 for misdemeanour domestic battery and harassment,” writes Tim Keown in ESPN The Magazine. “Those who hate Mayweather don’t want to see him lose; they want to see him buried.”   READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

Mayweather-Pacquiao bout, richest in history, attracts record 4.4M PPV buys


In this May 2, 2015 file photo, Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, hits Manny Pacquiao, from the Philippines, during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas. The broadcast of fight was marred by technical snafus and got sucker punched by Internet streamers, exposing the industry’s vulnerabilities. AP Photo/John Locher, File

MANILA, MAY 18, 2015 (PHILSTAR) By Dino Maragay - It’s official: The super fight between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao is the richest and most viewed boxing match in history.

The fight held last May 3 generated more than 4.4 million pay-per-view buys and over $400 million in revenue, shattering the previous record to become the highest-grossing PPV of all time.

Organizers said the fight’s total income could even go over $500 million once revenues from other sources – such as from the live gate at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, international television distribution, sponsorships, closed circuit and merchandise sales – come in.

The news was announced jointly by Showtime Networks Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, and HBO in conjunction with event promoters Mayweather Promotions and Top Rank, Inc.

The welterweight world championship unification bout nearly doubled the previous record of 2.48 million buys generated by the Oscar De La Hoya- Mayweather fight in 2007 and almost tripled the record $150 million in US PPV revenue made by the Mayweather-Canelo Alvarez bout in 2013.

READ MORE...
Live gate receipts for the star-studded event at the MGM Grand Garden Arena produced more than $71 million in revenue, dramatically eclipsing the previous live gate record of $20 million (for Mayweather vs. Canelo) for both the sport of boxing and Las Vegas.

Additionally, Mayweather-Pacquiao set the record for closed circuit admissions and revenue both in Las Vegas and at establishments nationwide. The event sold nearly 46,000 closed circuit admissions at MGM Resorts International properties in Las Vegas alone and was available at more than 5,000 bars, restaurants and commercial establishments throughout the US.

Distributed in 175 countries worldwide, the fight was available in essentially 75 percent of the world’s territories, setting the revenue record for international distribution.

Mayweather outpointed Pacquiao to become the unified WBC, WBA and WBO welterweight champion and extend his unbeaten streak to 48-0.


PHILSTAR

Nation welcomes people’s champ By Abac Cordero (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 13, 2015 - 12:00am


Manny and Jinkee Pacquiao and their children before leaving for home. instagram.com/jinkeepacquiao

MANILA, Philippines - Ten days after his gallant stand against Floyd Mayweather Jr., Filipino boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao finally comes home to a hero’s welcome today.

The Philippine Airlines jumbo jet carrying Pacquiao and his family from Los Angeles is expected to land at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport at 5 a.m.

After a brief press conference at the NAIA Terminal 2 VIP Lounge, Pacquiao will be brought to his hotel in Makati City for breakfast and a brief rest.

Then he will be paraded around town as the “People’s Champion.”

A Pacquiao associate said a courtesy call on President Aquino depends on the latter’s schedule for the day.

The 36-year-old fighting congressman lost a unanimous decision against Mayweather last May 2 before a sellout crowd of 16,507 at the MGM Grand and a worldwide audience.

It was billed as “The Fight of the Century” and early tracking of the pay-per-view sales suggests over five million buys or twice as much as the previous high.

As he prepared to leave his Los Angeles home, Pacquiao posed for a picture with his entire family, including wife Jinkee and kids Emmanuel, Michael, Princess, Queenie and Israel.

“Preparing for departure back to the Philippines,” said Pacquiao on his Instagram account, his right arm resting on a black sling.

READ MORE...
“I love my family so much,” he wrote.

Pacquiao fought with a lot of heart despite injuring his right shoulder a month before the fight and hurting it again after throwing a flurry in the fourth round.

To some, Pacquiao won a close fight.

During the post-fight interview at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Pacquiao himself said, “I thought I won the fight.”

However, days after, he said Mayweather “deserved” the victory.

But that’s all water under the bridge now.

Tomorrow, Pacquiao and his family will fly to General Santos City where a red-carpet welcome has been prepared by local government officials for its proudest son.

The chief of staff of of General Santos City Mayor Ronnel Rivera said they had prepared a grand arrival for Pacquiao.

“There would be military honors, motorcade along the main thoroughfares of the city and a press conference before he goes to Sarangani,” Glenda Narcilla told www.philboxing.com.

“Our fighting congressman deserves a hero’s welcome. Despite his right shoulder injury, he was the more aggressive fighter during the bout. We are proud of his performance and, for us, he is still the champion,” Narcilla added.

Pacquiao’s public information officer, Aquiles Zonio, said organizers of the parade have prepared a float for Pacquiao and his wife and top local officials.

People will shower Pacquiao with confetti.

“This is to show our moral support to our people’s champ despite his loss,” the mayor’s chief of staff also said.

An elaborate breakfast tribute to welcome Pacquiao will be hosted by the telecast team which aired the fight. The team headed by Solar Entertainment Corp. president CEO Wilson Tieng, includes representatives of ABS-CBN, GMA, TV5, Skycable and Cignal TV.

When Pacquiao faces the press at the NAIA, he will field questions surrounding his injury, the rehabilitation process, and the possibility of a rematch.

Pacquiao will be asked whether or not he’s thinking of retirement.

One of his closest friends, two-division world champion Gerry Peńalosa, said Pacquiao has nothing more to prove inside the ring, and it’s time to call it a day.

Pacquiao is in his second term as congressman in Sarangani province, and this early, he has set his sights on the 2016 election.

Prior to the fight, he said he may run for senator, but nothing is definite as of the moment.

Pacquiao’s chief adviser, Mike Koncz, told The STAR the other day there’s nothing on the table regarding boxing, and priority is how the boxer will recover from the injury.

Koncz did not comment on reports that the fight may exceed the five million mark in PPV sales.

If it does, then both superstars may end up earning twice as much as their guaranteed purse of $120 million and $80 million, respectively.

“When I have the documentation to substantiate the pay-per-view amount then I’ll disclose it. But I’m not going to speculate at this time,” said Koncz.

He took his hat off to Mayweather.

“Floyd was the better man that night and he won and he deserves the accolades for winning. As of this moment he’s called the best fighter in the world. We have no excuses,” he said.

Pacquiao, according to his adviser, is not bothered by the class-suits filed against him by disgruntled fans who felt cheated because Pacquiao climbed the ring injured.

“The lawsuits and the legal issues and anything else, we have our lawyers working on it. We have competent and great lawyers and they’ll take care of all these issues,” Koncz said.


MANILA BULLETIN

Low-key return as injured Pacquiao says retirement ‘near’ by AFP May 13, 2015 (updated)


Manny Pacquiao thumbs up where MANNY-lanios welcome Manny Pacman Pacquiao led by Manila Mayor Joseph Ejercito Estrada at the Rajah Sulayman Park along Roxas Boulevard in Malate Manila, May 13, 2015. Eight division world champion Manny Pacquiao receive a hero's welcome upon his arrival in Manila. Photo by: Linus Guardian Escandor II

Manila, Philippines –Manny Pacquiao made a low-key return to the Philippines on Wednesday after losing his mega-fight with Floyd Mayweather and said retirement was drawing closer as he recovers from shoulder surgery.

Few signs of Pacquiao’s early-morning arrival were visible at Manila airport, and he was later welcomed by modest crowds as he paraded the capital on the back of a flatbed truck.

It was very different from previous joyous homecomings for the eight-weight world champion and congressman, whose fights bring the Southeast Asian country to a standstill.

A smiling Pacquiao, his right arm supported by a black sling, told reporters he hadn’t yet decided on his future after his May 2 defeat by unanimous decision in Las Vegas.

“I will focus first on healing my shoulder. After that, I will announce continuing my career or announcing retirement,” Pacquiao said.

“I’m not saying I am going to retire, but it’s near. I’m already 36, turning 37 this December.”

READ MORE...
Pacquiao said it could take six months to recover from the operation on his torn rotator cuff, which he underwent days after what was billed as the “Fight of the Century”.

The American called Pacquiao a “sore loser” for blaming the injury for his defeat, and the Filipino is facing a law suit which claims he fraudulently concealed the problem.

Asked about a possible rematch with Mayweather, Pacquiao said: “I (would) like that. I want that. But my focus right now is my shoulder, my work as a congressman and my family.”

- ‘I won by two points’ -

Pacquiao said he had accepted his defeat to Mayweather, but after reviewing the fight on video, he believed he won by a slim margin.

“I reviewed the fight and kept score. I won by two points… But a decision has been made and we have to accept it,” he said.

Despite the loss, officials still laid on the motorcade around Manila, where autographed T-shirts and CDs of Pacquiao’s songs were flung to waiting fans.
Filipino ring icon Manny Pacquiao poses for photo after a press conference shortly after arriving from the US at the international airport in Manila on May 13, 2015. The Floyd Mayweather-Manny Pacquiao mega fight generated an eye-watering $400 million in US revenues fueled by more than 4.4 million pay-per-view buys, making it the highest-grossing fight in boxing history, organizers announced May 12. AFP PHOTO / TED ALJIBE

Later, the rags-to-riches “National Fist” was scheduled to pay a courtesy call to President Benigno Aquino.

Asked about his own presidential ambitions, Pacquiao said: “I am considering that. I am thinking about it.

“Our family has no other intention but to help our countrymen. We consider it an obligation.”

Pacquiao is not eligible to stand until he reaches the minimum age of 40, ruling him out of the next election in 2016, with 2022 likely to be his first opportunity.

But he said his wife’s worries over the enormous cost of higher political office — both to their bank accounts and to their family — was making him cautious.

“My wife said it’s difficult because we are losing time for our children,” Pacquiao said of his wife, Jinkee, with whom he has three sons and two daughters.

“We’ve also been spending millions out of our own pockets to help the poor. We can’t just shoo away people lined up at our door,” he said.

Pacquiao is on his second three-year term in the Philippines’ House of Representatives, representing his wife’s home province of Sarangani in the south. (Joel GUINTO)


PHILSTAR

Is Floyd’s credibility in tatters? By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 13, 2015 - 12:00am


Floyd Mayweather Jr

MANILA, Philippines - Now that the dust is finally settled after the so-called Fight of the Century has gone down in history, undefeated WBC/WBA/IBF welterweight champion Floyd Mayweather reigns virtually supreme in the 147-pound division but is he really The Best Ever as he claims? Is he more credible as a fighter with his win on points over Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas last May 2? Or is he less believable with his pre-fight pronouncements failing to turn into reality?

Mayweather, 38, insists he’s the greatest fighter of all time, belittling the achievements of ring legends Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Robinson and Henry Armstrong. Anticipating a backlash for his boast, he said he couldn’t care less. Mayweather has been described as delusional for his comments with Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield questioning if his 48-0 record is enough basis to support the brash declaration.

Defeating Pacquiao has sent Mayweather up in the clouds because it’s widely known that the Filipino had the best chance of any fighter in the horizon to put a stain on the 1996 Olympic bronze medalist’s record. But was Mayweather’s victory all that convincing? At least three judges thought so as Dave Moretti scored it 118-110 while Glenn Feldman and Burt Clements saw it 116-112. Even the Compubox stats reflected who was clearly the superior fighter that night as the numbers showed Mayweather landed 148 of 435 punches compared to Pacquiao’s 81 of 429. Never mind if the figures appeared unusually strange because Pacquiao is supposed to be a volume puncher and Mayweather, less active but more accurate. In this case, the situation was reversed.

Was it because Pacquiao fought with an injured right shoulder starting the fourth round? If the shoulder hampered Pacquiao’s ability to throw, why was he the more aggressive fighter until the last bell?

READ MORE...
Why didn’t Pacquiao reveal the injury when he was interviewed by HBO’s Max Kellerman in the ring shortly after it was announced that Mayweather had won a unanimous decision?

Before the bout, Mayweather promised it would be an exciting encounter. Was it? Did Mayweather do his part to make it exciting? This was the Fight of the Century, the Battle For Greatness but Mayweather turned it into a holding and dancing affair. How could Mayweather have thrown more punches than Pacquiao when most of the way, he held, danced and avoided engaging the Filipino dervish? Would Ali, Robinson and Armstrong have done the same to win a fight? Mayweather figured the only way to win was to stay away from Pacquiao’s strike zone so he fought defensively. He was out there not to lose instead of to win. Surely, this couldn’t be the right way to win by the man who’s self-proclaimed to be The Best Ever.

Mayweather’s father and trainer Floyd Sr. predicted a decisive ending. “Floyd gonna hit him so easy,” he said. “Floyd will dominate him bad. He gonna paralyze him. Floyd got a good chance of knocking him out. He’s going to look smaller than that when Floyd gets through with his ass. We gonna chop him down some more.”

As it turned out, Mayweather was nowhere close to scoring a knockout. That’s because he never risked a close encounter. He kept a safe distance away, backtracking, sidestepping and clinching whenever Pacquiao came dangerously close to punching away. Pacquiao was never hurt, never staggered.

For Mayweather, living is all about money which by the way, is what he calls himself. “There ain’t no losers when you make nine figures for 36 minutes of work,” he said quoted by Tim Keown in ESPN The Magazine. For sure, Mayweather works hard to earn his millions. He’s the only fighter in history with at least two bouts of over two million pay-per-view buys and when the accounting is done for the Pacquiao match, it will be three. To Mayweather, money is all that counts in life and it’s what brings him friends, adulation and fame. He is the embodiment of greed, extravagance, opulence and avarice.

“Mayweather is invariably described as polarizing, a word that is as woefully noncomprehensive as it is factual,” wrote Keown. “He is the greatest fighter of his generation. He is also a man whose eagerness to proclaim his own talent – he calls himself TBE or The Best Ever – and flaunt his extreme lifestyle has caused a good percentage of those who pay attention to boxing to revile him. His history of violence against women has triggered outright revulsion – three convictions, including one that landed him a two-month jail term in 2012 for misdemeanor domestic battery and harassment. Those who hate Mayweather don’t want to see him lose; they want to see him buried.”

Mayweather said he’ll fight Pacquiao in a rematch “a year after his surgery.” He previously said his last fight ever will be in September against a still unknown opponent. Then, a few days later, he changed his mind and branded Pacquiao “a sore loser” and “a coward.” Mayweather had earlier praised Pacquiao as “a hell of a fighter, I take my hat off to him, now I see why he’s one of the guys that are at the pinnacle of the sport of boxing.” Mayweather’s Jekyll and Hyde routine makes him difficult to pin down for a clear statement. He’s as elusive outside the ring as in it. But maybe, that’s what makes Mayweather a marketable commodity. He thrives in being controversial, contradictory, unpredictable and unreliable.

For over five years, he avoided battling Pacquiao, raising speculation he didn’t want to gamble losing his perfect record at the peak of the Filipino’s career. Mayweather put out different reasons, if not excuses, to delay the inevitable until he was good and ready to get it on. There was talk that the CBS-owned Showtime pressured Mayweather into coming to terms with Pacquiao because the cable TV network pushed for a big ticket item after noticing a drop in his pay-per-view popularity. But that couldn’t be confirmed. It’s hard to confirm anything with Mayweather because of his volatility. His credibility took a hit in beating Pacquiao but Mayweather is still the world’s No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter and money is really all that matters to him.


INQUIRER

I just want to tell the truth, says Pacquiao Philippine Daily Inquirer 1:44 AM | Sunday, May 17th, 2015


FILE – In this May 2, 2015 photo, trainer Freddie Roach, left, listens as Manny Pacquiao answers questions during a press conference following his welterweight title fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. in Las Vegas. Pacquiao could face disciplinary action from Nevada boxing officials for failing to disclose a shoulder injury before the fight. Nevada Athletic Commission Chairman Francisco Aguilar said that the state attorney general's office will look at why Pacquiao checked 'no' a day before the fight on a commission questionnaire asking if he had a shoulder injury. (AP Photo/John Locher)

GENERAL SANTOS CITY—“I’m not a sore loser. I just wanna tell the truth so the people will know.”

This was what eight-division boxing champ and Sarangani Rep. Manny Pacquiao said when asked about his reaction to Floyd Mayweather’s statement that he was not interested in a rematch with the Filipino boxer “because he’s a sore loser and he’s a coward.”

The interview was recorded for Showtime on Tuesday and will air Saturday night in the US after the replay of the Pacquiao-Mayweather fight but some of the American boxer’s quotes were released ahead of time.

Mayweather also said Pacquiao was “absolutely not” hampered by his shoulder injury.

But Pacquiao said he “fought in an uneven playing field where my opponent was in control of everything, inside and outside the ring.”

Pacquiao claimed the fight gave him a chance to know the real Mayweather.

“He’s an astute fighter who doesn’t have the so-called sense of fair play,” Pacquiao said.

READ MORE...
The Pinoy ring icon emphasized he had accepted his defeat and he did not harbor rancor against the judges.

“I respect the decision of the judges and I accept my defeat,” he said.

Pacquiao also said he was not thinking of a rematch with Mayweather.

“Right now, my focus is to fully recover from my right shoulder injury and on my job as a lawmaker,” he said.

Speaking at a mall here Friday, Pacquiao bared he was moved to tears after watching the footage of the fight.

“When I went back to my hotel, I reviewed the fight and I saw the people’s reactions; that’s when I cried because of the support of the people before and after my fight,”ť he said.

He also apologized to his fans and the Filipino people in general for his loss.

“I was disappointed because I failed to give you joy,” he added. Aquiles Zonio and Jeoffrey Maitem, Inquirer Mindanao


PHILSTAR

Jinkee: It’s time for Manny to retire By Abac Cordero (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 14, 2015 - 12:00am


JINKEE

MANILA, Philippines - Jinkee Pacquiao is stepping down as vice governor of Sarangani next year and is hoping that Manny Pacquiao will retire from boxing.

“My prayer is for Manny to retire. He should retire,” said Jinkee upon their arrival from Los Angeles yesterday morning.

Jinkee believes that Pacquiao, who’s turning 37 in December, has nothing more to prove in his 20 years as a professional boxer.

He’s the only boxer in history to win world titles in eight different weight classes, and has already brought so much pride and honor to the country.

Despite the bitter loss to Floyd Mayweather Jr. May 2 in Las Vegas, Jinkee said her husband can leave the sport with his head held high.

“Wala na siya dapat patunayan. He has accomplished everything,” Jinkee told The STAR in a recent interview.

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Yesterday, at the NAIA Terminal 2, Jinkee told GMA News that she’s stepping down as vice governor of her province, a post she has held since 2013.

“I’m thinking of my family now. At least I’ve experienced how it is being a politician,” she said.

Jinkee said life in politics is difficult one.

“Mahirap,” she said.

“And magastos (It’s costly),” added Jinkee, who plans to spend more time with their five children – Emmanuel, Michael, Princess, Queenie and Israel.

But she’s hoping that Pacquiao retires from boxing as well.

Jinkee is not against Pacquiao moving on as a politician, and help the people, especially the poor, as long as he quits boxing.

“That’s my stand. I want Manny to retire from boxing. That’s what I told him after the fight with Mayweather,” she said.

“And I’ve been praying for that. I want a simple life,” she said, adding that the injury Pacquiao sustained in his latest fight could be a sign.

“Maybe it’s a message for him na magpahinga na (to take a break). He’s not getting any younger. It’s the first time he had a surgery – in his whole life,” she said.

Jinkee is also thinking about the safety of her husband, who’d been to 65 professional fights.

“I really wish Manny retires,” she said.


PHILSTAR

Antithesis of sports SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 17, 2015 - 12:00am


Joaquin Henson

You would be unnerved when you hear Floyd Mayweather, Jr. explain his philosophy of sports. He couldn’t care less about how he wins a fight, he’ll do what it takes to bring it home. Who cares if he gets booed? Who cares if the fans get bored? His motivation is money, it’s all about the hard cash. It’s what drives him. Legacy? Mayweather says that can’t buy things. Working smart is better than working hard. He doesn’t mind cutting corners or taking the easy way out for as long as he’s one step ahead of the other guy.

Mexican fighter Canelo Alvarez says, “Mayweather’s a fighter that if with three punches he wins the round from you, he’s fine with that … he doesn’t expose anything and give a beautiful fight, he doesn’t care in what way he wins as long as he wins.” Writer Justin Moyer of the Washington Post quotes a source as saying, “While Floyd wins, he does so in an almost boring fashion, he doesn’t usually brawl as crowds want to see, with big punches and fighters standing toe-to-toe in a slugfest, Floyd fights the way Floyd fights and doesn’t let others dictate his style.”

If greed is what defines him, Mayweather has little concern for virtue. He has no qualms in beating up women. A prizefighter’s fists are considered deadly weapons but Mayweather was unrestrained in abusing the mother of three of his four children. The victim was assaulted in front of two of their children and was allegedly treated for a concussion, cuts and bruises. “His history of violence against women has triggered outright revulsion – three convictions, including one that landed him a two-month jail term in 2012 for misdemeanour domestic battery and harassment,” writes Tim Keown in ESPN The Magazine. “Those who hate Mayweather don’t want to see him lose; they want to see him buried.”

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Unfortunately, for the haters, they’ll have to wait for somebody other than Manny Pacquiao to beat Mayweather and that somebody may not even come along. Pacquiao had his chance in Las Vegas last May 2 but lost a unanimous decision. It’s a wasteful exercise to debate whether or not Mayweather deserved to win. Could there have been a conspiracy to assure a Pacquiao defeat?

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Was there a deliberate conditioning of the mind in the way judge Dave Moretti awarded only two rounds for Pacquiao and the Compubox stats showed a wide disparity of punches landed? Compubox said Mayweather connected 148 punches to Pacquiao’s 81. But an American website BoxingNews24 recently used a frame-by-frame, slow-motion analysis of the numbers and found Pacquiao landing 98 blows to Mayweather’s 68. Unless a conspirator comes out in public and confesses, you’ll never know for sure if a plot was hatched in the first place.

The reality is Mayweather won and his perfect record remains intact. He’s now 48-0 and a win away from duplicating the late heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano’s 49-0 mark when he retired in 1955.

Yet, if you ask Mayweather how important it is to preserve his unblemished record, he’ll say it’s not as important as stashing money in the bank. Mayweather used to be known as Pretty Boy as in Pretty Boy Floyd, the American gangster of the ‘30s. The fighter obviously enjoyed being called Pretty Boy Floyd and in early publicity shots, posed as the bank robber, holding a machine gun and wearing garish ‘30s garb. Now, he’s called Money and enjoying the notoriety of taking money from the people like Pretty Boy Floyd did when he robbed banks.

Mayweather likes to flaunt his wealth. He worked hard for his money so in his mind, he’s earned the right to spend it as he pleases. During a torrid 18-month spending spree that ended last December, he bought 35 cars including a $3.2 Million red Ferrari Enzo. Mayweather is a betting machine and when he wins, announces to the world what a smart gambler he is. Keown says Mayweather is shameless in “the way he throws out his chin and holds up his money and dares the world to tell him what it sees.”

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Mayweather says fighting is just a means to making money. “It (the perfect record) don’t define my career,” he says. “The great thing about my career is I was a smart businessman. Let’s talk about that – a 19-year career with no punishment on the body and hundreds of millions. Now, that’s something to talk about. At the end of the day, my daughter can’t eat no zero. She can eat the money zero. She can’t spend the boxing record. It’s just work. I just look at it as my job to do what I do. Even 10 years from now, I’m still going to be getting a seven-figure check every month. Of course, I love the fans. I want to give them excitement. I love them. But no, it was the money. Me investing. I look at things in a business aspect.”

Because of Mayweather’s attitude, don’t be surprised if he sells the $1 Million emerald green belt that was awarded by the WBC after the Las Vegas bout. The belt has diamonds and is embossed with 3,000 emeralds. Letters and logos are in gold. There are pictures of the late WBC president Jose Sulaiman, Muhammad Ali, Mayweather and Pacquiao clamped on the belt. Since Mayweather cares only for money, it’s a sure thing that he’ll sell the belt to the highest bidder. Why not?

As for somebody coming along to beat Mayweather, the window is slowly closing on finding the mystery man. Mayweather says he’ll fight one last time in September. His opponent can’t be Pacquiao in a rematch because the Filipino icon won’t be ready until after a year to recover from surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff in the right shoulder. Will Mayweather backtrack and fight beyond September, perhaps against Pacquiao in a rematch? First, he said yes then he said no. That’s Mayweather for you. The man speaks with forked tongue. But if money is his god, you can bet he’ll be back to fight Pacquiao if there is public clamor that translates into another fat paycheck.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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