SPORTS NEWS THE WEEK AFTER
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

PACQUIAO HIT WITH FLURRY OF PUNCHES BY ANGRY VIEWERS
[Consumers claim they wouldn’t have paid to see the match if Pacquiao had admitted his shoulder was injured.]


Pacquiao of the Philippines takes a punch from Mayweather, Jr. of the U.S. in the second round during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas Manny Pacquiao takes a punch from Floyd Mayweather, Jr. in Las Vegas, Nevada, May 2, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Marcus Boxing metaphors are a cliché of legal journalism but for once they’re entirely appropriate:
Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao and his promoters and business advisers have been hit with a flurry of punches by viewers who paid between $90 and $100 apiece to watch Pacquiao’s fight Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr in the so-called Fight of the Century. In seven different class actions filed in federal courts in four different states, consumers claim they wouldn’t have paid to see the match if Pacquiao had admitted his shoulder was injured. Instead, the lawsuits assert, Pacquiao, his promotion company Top Rank and his advisers hid the injury from the Nevada Athletic Commission and from prospective pay-per-view customers. Only after the fight, according to the filings, did Pacquiao’s camp admit he had been injured in a training session in early April and was fighting at significantly less than full strength. Five of the suits just name defendants associated with Pacquiao. One, filed in federal court in Chicago, also names Mayweather and his promotion company as well as broadcasters HBO, Showtime, AT&T, Comcast and DirecTV. The Chicago complaint doesn’t offer specific evidence that anyone outside of Pacquiao’s entourage was aware of the injury but asserts all of the defendants concealed the news to maximize their pay-per-view profits. My Reuters colleague David Ingram reached out to all of the defendants but received a response only from Pacquiao lawyer Daniel Petrocelli of O’Melveny & Myers, who said in an email, “The lawsuits are factually wrong and legally wrong, and we expect they will be dismissed in due course.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: Mayweather wants to visit the Philippines and along with Manny help feed less fortunate


UNDEFEATED pound-for-pound king Floyd Mayweather Jr., who cemented his status with a lopsided 12-round unanimous decision over eight-division world champion Manny Pacquiao last Sunday, said he wants to visit the Philippines, and along with Pacquiao, “help feed the less fortunate.”  “I still want to go over to the Philippines and help feed the people, who are less fortunate,” said Mayweather in an interview with close friend Ben Thompson of Fight Hype. He pointed out he has “Filipino people who work for me and they love me and support me the same way I support them.” 
Mayweather cushioned the impact of the loss to Pacquiao by stating, “Manny Pacquiao still is a winner. We both made good money, it was a match that had to happen whether it was toe-to-toe, counter punching, smart boxing it was just a fight that had to happen. A lot of people are more upset because it was a one-sided victory to be honest. I’m not saying that he didn’t put up a good fight because he did, at times.”  THIS IS THE FULL REPORT

ALSO: Pacquiao, Mayweather face lawsuits; the 2 boxers accused of deception to sell the bout


Photographers and writers pose Manny Pacquiao inside his home in Hollywood, CA during an interview on Tuesday, 5 May 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA/INQUIRER/See more at FRAME
 LOS ANGELES—Call it the fallout of the century. Others describe it as the “Dud of the Century.”  At least five class-action suits have been filed across the United States, seeking millions of dollars in compensation on behalf of those who bought tickets for the fight between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr., forked out pay-per-view fees or bet on the fight. Mayweather earned an emphatic, unanimous 12-round decision over Pacquiao in the feverishly anticipated bout that will go down as the richest in boxing history and by critics as one of the most overhyped. The complainants are suing Pacquiao and others for failing to disclose a shoulder injury the Filipino ring icon suffered prior to his “Fight of the Century” against Mayweather. The lawsuit filed in the US District Court in Illinois not only names Pacquiao and promoters of Top Rank but also telecasters of HBO and Showtime, who combined to produce the pay-per-view fight program that was sold in the United States for about $100. The suit also names Mayweather, Mayweather Promotions and cable television providers AT&T, Comcast and DirecTV, and accuses the defendants of deceptive practices in marketing and advertising the bout. Misrepresented.READ MORE...

ALSO: Mayweather changes mind, calls Pacquio sore loser, nixes rematch


MAYWEATHER:
A few days after saying he’s open to a rematch with Manny Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather Jr. has taken a 180-degree turn. In a text message to Stephen A. Smith of ESPN a couple of days ago, Mayweather said he’ll fight Pacquiao again next year after the Filipino’s right shoulder heals. But that isn’t the case anymore. The undefeated American, according to a report by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael, told Showtime’s Jim Gray that he has changed his mind, blasting Pacquiao as a “sore loser" and a “coward.”  "Did I text Stephen A. Smith and say I will fight him again? Yeah, but I change my mind. At this particular time, no, because he's a sore loser and he's a coward," Mayweather told Gray in a taped interview that will air this Saturday night on Showtime (Sunday in Manila). Mayweather outfoxed Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas last Sunday to remain unbeaten and become the unified WBC, WBA and WO welterweight champion. It was revealed after the bout – the richest ever in boxing history – that Pacquiao entered the ring with a bum right shoulder which he sustained in training three weeks prior to his encounter with Mayweather. READ MORE...

ALSO: Unbeaten but unappreciated - By Joaquin Henson


Mayweather:  I'm proud of my defense' There is a dictum in boxing that when a round is close or could go either way, you score it for the aggressor. There is another dictum that according to Tom Kaczmarek in his 29-page booklet “You Be The Boxing Judge!,” good defense is not holding, clinching or running … “in fact, holding and clinching are subject to penalty by the referee if abused.”  What happened in the supposed Fight of the Century between Floyd Mayweather, Jr. and Manny Pacquiao in Las Vegas last weekend was a disappointment. Fans paid good money to watch an eventful bout at the MGM Grand Garden Arena or in their homes on pay-per-view TV or in closed circuit theaters. They felt robbed in the end. So did Pacquiao. The Battle For Greatness was touted to preserve the integrity of boxing by determining the true world welterweight champion since the winner would be recognized by three of the four leading governing bodies, the WBA, WBC and WBO. READ MORE...

ALSO PHNO 'Must Read': Rematch looms but when?


By Joaquin M. Henson It’s hard enough to beat Floyd Mayweather, Jr. with two hands. But last weekend, Manny Pacquiao battled Mayweather with just one hand starting the third round after he hyperextended his previously injured right shoulder. Despite the handicap, Pacquiao pursued Mayweather like a dog chasing a bone. He was clearly the aggressor as Mayweather reprised his role in “Dancing With the Stars” and did his best interpretation as a lover boy, demonstrating an embrace that put romantics to shame. Compubox, the reliable gatherer of fight stats, came up with surprising figures in the end. Its owner and operator Bob Canobbio sat beside me on the first row at ringside during the bout. I was probably the first to see what numbers Canobbio wrote on the stats sheet. Throughout the fight, Canobbio’s eyes were fixed on a screen monitor above a long desk in front of him showing the punches thrown and landed, broken down into jabs and power shots. He wrote down the numbers and connect rates then passed the sheet over to a staffer who made copies for media. READ MORE...

ALSO: 5 Boxers Who Can Save Boxing from Irrelevance
[" That used to be the mentality — boxers went into the ring to fight. They wanted to knock people out. They wanted to take the decision out of the judges hands. Today, instead of boxing for the knockout, fighters are boxing for the decision. Instead of fighting to win, they’re fighting not to lose and they’re getting rewarded for it. ” ]


SOLOBOXEO.COM by SALVADOR RODRIGUEZ ESPNDeportes.com the May 7, 2015 News MEXICO
- One of the greatest heavyweight champions of all time, Evander Holyfield, refused to criticize Floyd Mayweather for the way he won last Saturday Manny Pacquiao, but launched strong challenges to boxing in general, the referees and judges rewarded today more to the defense than aggression. Evander-Holyfield-9342655-1-402About to turn 53, Holyfield is currently serving four years he retired, and was witness called by many as the 'fight of the century "between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd, and like many, was disappointed, but not the fight, which even he cataloged good, but the way boxing is conducted today. 
On Wednesday, Evander Holyfield contributed a piece to The Players' Tribune about the lack of action in today's boxing world. He stated: "The concept of fighting is simple: Hit the other guy and don’t let the other guy hit you. Today, there’s a whole lot of trying not to get hit and not a whole lot of hitting. How can you have a boxing match if guys aren’t throwing and landing punches?"  The fight billed as "The Fight of the Century" pitting Floyd Mayweather against Manny Pacquiao may have been a huge let down to many fans. In the eyes of some fight fans, it may have tarnished the reputation of boxing, as Holyfield highlighted. READ MORE....who the 5 boxers are...


READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

Next fight for Pacquiao? Fending off class actions by angry viewers.

LOS ANGELES, MAY 11, 2015 (REUTERS) By Alison Frankel May 6, 2015 - Boxing metaphors are a cliché of legal journalism but for once they’re entirely appropriate:

Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao and his promoters and business advisers have been hit with a flurry of punches by viewers who paid between $90 and $100 apiece to watch Pacquiao’s fight Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr in the so-called Fight of the Century.

In seven different class actions filed in federal courts in four different states, consumers claim they wouldn’t have paid to see the match if Pacquiao had admitted his shoulder was injured. Instead, the lawsuits assert, Pacquiao, his promotion company Top Rank and his advisers hid the injury from the Nevada Athletic Commission and from prospective pay-per-view customers.

Only after the fight, according to the filings, did Pacquiao’s camp admit he had been injured in a training session in early April and was fighting at significantly less than full strength.

Five of the suits just name defendants associated with Pacquiao. One, filed in federal court in Chicago, also names Mayweather and his promotion company as well as broadcasters HBO, Showtime, AT&T, Comcast and DirecTV.

The Chicago complaint doesn’t offer specific evidence that anyone outside of Pacquiao’s entourage was aware of the injury but asserts all of the defendants concealed the news to maximize their pay-per-view profits.


PETROCELLI

My Reuters colleague David Ingram reached out to all of the defendants but received a response only from Pacquiao lawyer Daniel Petrocelli of O’Melveny & Myers, who said in an email, “The lawsuits are factually wrong and legally wrong, and we expect they will be dismissed in due course.”

READ MORE...
Obviously, we’ll have to wait to see what arguments Petrocelli – a fierce lawyer who, to use one of those boxing clichés, is good to have in your corner – comes up with. (I called to ask him to expand on his email statement but didn’t hear back.)

And unless the Chicago plaintiffs can come up with evidence that Mayweather and the broadcasters were aware of Pacquiao’s injuries, I don’t think those defendants have much to worry about.

The case against Pacquiao and his people, on the other hand, definitely has a lot of common-sense appeal (assuming the allegations are true and the Pacquiao camp really did cover up his injury): Because of Pacquiao’s supposed lies, customers didn’t get what they paid for.

The class actions raise claims under state consumer and fraud laws, and eventually, judges are going to have to figure out whether the litigation should proceed as a nationwide class action or as statewide cases. (Two of the suits, one filed in Texas and the other in California, were brought on behalf of statewide classes.)

Regardless of how that sorts out, viewers will argue that they were promised a fight between two healthy boxers and that’s not the product they received.

I’m pretty confident, however, that their simple, common-sense argument isn’t going to turn out to be so simple at all. One big issue will be whether consumers actually bought anything from Pacquiao and the Pacquiao defendants.

Yes, the fighters received a cut of the pay-per-view proceeds, but was the money directly from pay-per-view customers? And if not – if money from consumers went to their television and internet service providers, which, in turn paid the boxers – do consumers have a right to sue Pacquiao for defrauding them? You can be sure Petrocelli and O’Melveny & Myers will argue that they do not.

There is also the complication of what pay-per-view customers agreed to in contracts with their television and Internet service providers. Most consumer contracts require arbitration and prohibit class actions.

Pacquiao could argue that even if pay-per-view purchasers have a claim against him, they can’t sue as a class but must go to individual arbitration. Consumers typically don’t bother to bring $100 arbitration cases so if Pacquiao could win a ruling that their claims are subject to arbitration, he’d erase most of his exposure.

Plaintiffs’ lawyer William Federman of Federman & Sherwood, who represents a viewer in a Los Angeles federal court class action against Pacquiao and his promotion company, told me he anticipates the defendants will raise both mandatory arbitration and right-to-sue arguments.

He said that because Pacquiao received pay-per-view revenue, consumers ought to be able to sue him for fraud. He also said he doesn’t believe consumer contracts with their television and Internet service providers will apply to the claims against Pacquiao so the case will be allowed to proceed as a class action.

Plaintiffs’ lawyer Robert Duncan, who filed the Chicago case along with Agruss Law Firm and Cronin & Co, also said pay-per-view customers can sue Pacquiao even if they did not pay him directly to see the fight. “We believe our clients were sold a product that didn’t exist,” he said.

If courts do allow pay-per-view purchasers to litigate against Pacquiao, they may have a hard time showing that they didn’t get what they paid for, according to Michael McCann, a sports law professor at the University of New Hampshire.

McCann pointed to suits by New York Jets ticket holders who said the New England Patriots owed them compensation for stealing Jets plays and by San Antonio Spurs fans who sued to recover ticket prices for a game in which the team rested star players. Both cases were tossed, McCann said.

Interestingly, the litigation that was expected to follow the fight hasn’t materialized. Before the match, Showtime, HBO and the boxers’ promotion companies filed a preemptive copyright infringement suit against unnamed Internet sites they expected to provide unauthorized live streams of the fight.

The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that users of the services Periscope and Meerkat posted links to live-stream video during the fight.

Both services told the Journal they’d received dozens of takedown notices from copyright holders.

But so far – and maybe because the services responded quickly to the takedown notices – copyright holders haven’t sued any known sites for showing unauthorized video.

(This story has been corrected. A previous version incorrectly identified Dan Petrocelli’s law firm.)


MANILA STANDARD

Mayweather wants to visit the Philippines By Ronnie Nathanielsz | May. 08, 2015 at 12:01am

UNDEFEATED pound-for-pound king Floyd Mayweather Jr., who cemented his status with a lopsided 12-round unanimous decision over eight-division world champion Manny Pacquiao last Sunday, said he wants to visit the Philippines, and along with Pacquiao, “help feed the less fortunate.”

“I still want to go over to the Philippines and help feed the people, who are less fortunate,” said Mayweather in an interview with close friend Ben Thompson of Fight Hype.

He pointed out he has “Filipino people who work for me and they love me and support me the same way I support them.”

Mayweather cushioned the impact of the loss to Pacquiao by stating, “Manny Pacquiao still is a winner. We both made good money, it was a match that had to happen whether it was toe-to-toe, counter punching, smart boxing it was just a fight that had to happen. A lot of people are more upset because it was a one-sided victory to be honest. I’m not saying that he didn’t put up a good fight because he did, at times.”


INQUIRER

Pacquiao, Mayweather face lawsuits;The 2 boxers accused of deception to sell the bout 1:21 AM | Friday, May 8th, 2015


Photographers and writers pose Manny Pacquiao inside his home in Hollywood, CA during an interview on Tuesday, 5 May 2015. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA/INQUIRER/See more at FRAME

LOS ANGELES—Call it the fallout of the century.

Others describe it as the “Dud of the Century.”

At least five class-action suits have been filed across the United States, seeking millions of dollars in compensation on behalf of those who bought tickets for the fight between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr., forked out pay-per-view fees or bet on the fight.

Mayweather earned an emphatic, unanimous 12-round decision over Pacquiao in the feverishly anticipated bout that will go down as the richest in boxing history and by critics as one of the most overhyped.

The complainants are suing Pacquiao and others for failing to disclose a shoulder injury the Filipino ring icon suffered prior to his “Fight of the Century” against Mayweather.

The lawsuit filed in the US District Court in Illinois not only names Pacquiao and promoters of Top Rank but also telecasters of HBO and Showtime, who combined to produce the pay-per-view fight program that was sold in the United States for about $100.

The suit also names Mayweather, Mayweather Promotions and cable television providers AT&T, Comcast and DirecTV, and accuses the defendants of deceptive practices in marketing and advertising the bout.

Misrepresented

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“Defendants, individually and collectively, deceptively and fraudulently promoted, produced and sold the fight as one between two healthy fighters … expressly misrepresenting the health of Manny Pacquiao to the Nevada State Athletic Commission, all in an effort to maximize and collect pay-per-view revenue,” the lawsuit claims.

Pacquiao revealed after the fight that he had been held back by a shoulder complaint.

It did not take long for the lawsuits to come flooding in.

‘Dud of the Century’

Two men in Nevada sued on Tuesday, saying the promotion violated the state’s Deceptive Trade Practices Act.

In a similar suit filed in California, plaintiff Howard B. Sirota cites former heavyweight world champion Mike Tyson as calling the long-anticipated bout the “Dud of the Century.”

Some of the lawsuits point to the prefight medical questionnaire signed by Pacquiao for Nevada boxing authorities in which he checked “no” to the question, “Have you had any injury to your shoulders, elbows or hands that needed evaluation or examination?”

Pacquiao adviser Michael Koncz, named as a defendant in some of the lawsuits, has said he inadvertently ticked the wrong box.

Biggest fight ever

Daniel Petrocelli, a lawyer for Pacquiao and Top Rank promotions, told The Los Angeles Times he was confident the lawsuit would be dismissed.

“It claims Pacquiao was injured (immediately) before the bout and that’s not true … he was injured (nearly a month) before the bout,” Petrocelli said.

The bout was expected to be the top-grossing prizefight of all time.

Mayweather walked out of MGM Grand Garden Arena with a check for $100 million—just the first installment of a payday that could reach $200 million when all the pay-per-view sales, ticket sales, closed circuit TV viewings and other revenue are totted up and shared out.

Pacquiao is expected to receive more than $100 million.

The complainants said they felt defrauded by Pacquiao’s failure to disclose his shoulder injury.

The lawsuits were filed in federal courts in California, Illinois, Nevada and Texas.

The lawsuits seek compensation under laws meant to protect consumers and ask for status as class actions on behalf of ticket buyers, pay-per-view TV viewers and people who gambled on the fight.

“The lawsuits are factually wrong and legally wrong, and we expect they will be dismissed in due course,” Petrocelli said in a statement on Wednesday.

One of the lawsuits named as defendants several businesses involved in broadcasting and promoting the fight: Time Warner unit Home Box Office Inc., CBS Corp. unit Showtime Networks Inc., AT&T, Comcast Corp. and DirecTV.

Old injury

Spokespeople for Mayweather and the companies did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Barely one hour after the contest ended, Pacquiao’s promoter, Bob Arum, said the 36-year-old southpaw had been hampered by an “old” injury to his right shoulder.

Neither Pacquiao nor his team appeared to have informed the Nevada commission about the shoulder issue until a couple of hours before the start of the fight when they asked for an anti-inflammatory injection.

$300M suit for monopoly

Oscar De La Hoya’s boxing promotion company is suing Floyd Mayweather’s manager and investors for $300 million, alleging they’re trying to illegally monopolize US championship fighting.

Golden Boy Promotions filed the federal antitrust and unfair competition suit on Wednesday in Los Angeles.

It names Al Haymon, his companies, and the venture capital firm Waddell & Reed Financial.

The suit alleges Haymon, who represents more than 150 fighters, violates the federal Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act and also California and Nevada state laws by acting as both manager and promoter.

Disciplinary action

While Haymon doesn’t call himself a promoter, the suit claims he has forbidden his boxers to sign with other promoters and both arranged and paid for sponsors, arenas and TV airtime for championship matches—and even paid the purses.

Messages left at Waddell & Reed and Haymon’s Premier Boxing Champions weren’t immediately returned.

The suits come as Nevada boxing regulators are looking into possible disciplinary action against Pacquiao for failing to disclose the injury suffered in training for the fight.

Rematch

“Our job is to protect the health and safety of fighters and the integrity of the sport,” Nevada State Athletic Commission chair Francisco Aguilar said. “We expect our fighters to be forthright.”

Pacquiao said he reinjured the shoulder in the fourth round when he landed his best punches of the night against Mayweather.

Mayweather said in a text to ESPN personality Stephen A. Smith that he would welcome a rematch with Pacquiao.

“I will fight him in a year after his surgery,” the text read.

Different kind of suit

Mayweather is facing another lawsuit, but of a different kind.

Earlier, his ex-girlfriend filed a defamation suit against him, claiming he lied in an interview about her being intoxicated with drugs during a domestic abuse incident in 2010.

Josie Harris, mother of Mayweather’s three children, is asking for $20 million in damages after Mayweather claimed that she was on drugs and that he was just trying to restrain her during an altercation, according to a CNN report.

Mayweather was arrested in 2010 after authorities said he punched Harris in her Las Vegas home. He pleaded guilty and served two months of a three-month jail term.–Wire reports and Bong Lozada, Inquirer.net


PHILSTAR

Mayweather changes mind, nixes Pacquiao rematch By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated May 8, 2015 - 7:26am


"Did I text Stephen A. Smith and say I will fight him again? Yeah, but I change my mind. At this particular time, no, because he's a sore loser and he's a coward,"


MANILA, Philippines – A few days after saying he’s open to a rematch with Manny Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather Jr. has taken a 180-degree turn.

In a text message to Stephen A. Smith of ESPN a couple of days ago, Mayweather said he’ll fight Pacquiao again next year after the Filipino’s right shoulder heals.

But that isn’t the case anymore. The undefeated American, according to a report by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael, told Showtime’s Jim Gray that he has changed his mind, blasting Pacquiao as a “sore loser" and a “coward.”

"Did I text Stephen A. Smith and say I will fight him again? Yeah, but I change my mind. At this particular time, no, because he's a sore loser and he's a coward," Mayweather told Gray in a taped interview that will air this Saturday night on Showtime (Sunday in Manila).

Mayweather outfoxed Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas last Sunday to remain unbeaten and become the unified WBC, WBA and WO welterweight champion. It was revealed after the bout – the richest ever in boxing history – that Pacquiao entered the ring with a bum right shoulder which he sustained in training three weeks prior to his encounter with Mayweather.

READ MORE...
Mayweather, however, isn’t buying Pacquiao’s injury.

"If you lost, accept the loss and say, 'Mayweather, you were the better fighter,'" added Mayweather, who ran away with a unanimous decision victory over Pacquiao.

"I'm not going to buy into the [expletive] ... and I don't want the public to buy into the [expletive," he continued.

Pacquiao was supposed to take anti-inflammatory injections to numb the pain in his shoulder just before the fight, but his camp’s failure to disclose the injury to state sports officials prohibited him from taking the shots.

For his part, Mayweather said Pacquiao shouldn’t be making excuses.

"He [Pacquiao] lost. He knows he lost. I lost a lot of respect for him after all of this," the Las Vegas-based boxer continued.

Pacquiao, who yesterday underwent successful surgery for a torn rotator cuff, claimed the injury prevented him from unleashing powerful right hooks, and that he was limited to throwing jabs and left straights instead.

Asked if he felt Pacquiao’s injury affected the fighting congressman’s performance that night, Mayweather disagreed.

"Absolutely not. He was fast. His left hand was fast. His right hand was fast and he was throwing them both fast and strong. Excuses, excuses," Mayweather ended.


PHILSTAR

Unbeaten but unappreciated SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 8, 2015 - 12:00am


By Joaquin Henson

There is a dictum in boxing that when a round is close or could go either way, you score it for the aggressor.

There is another dictum that according to Tom Kaczmarek in his 29-page booklet “You Be The Boxing Judge!,” good defense is not holding, clinching or running … “in fact, holding and clinching are subject to penalty by the referee if abused.”

What happened in the supposed Fight of the Century between Floyd Mayweather, Jr. and Manny Pacquiao in Las Vegas last weekend was a disappointment. Fans paid good money to watch an eventful bout at the MGM Grand Garden Arena or in their homes on pay-per-view TV or in closed circuit theaters. They felt robbed in the end. So did Pacquiao.

The Battle For Greatness was touted to preserve the integrity of boxing by determining the true world welterweight champion since the winner would be recognized by three of the four leading governing bodies, the WBA, WBC and WBO.

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Only the IBF was left out of the equation. The IBF welterweight champion is unbeaten Englishman Kell Brook.

The commercially-oriented WBA has two titlists, Mayweather in the “super” category and undefeated Keith Thurman in the “regular” category, so it charges sanction fees both ways. Mayweather is the WBA’s business class champion while Thurman is the economy class ruler.

There are 74 world champions in 17 weight divisions recognized by the four bodies, an anomaly that Mayweather and Pacquiao were out to address at least in the welterweight class.


'Feels proud of his defense'

The megafight went the distance and the decision went to Mayweather.

Three judges were unanimous in picking Mayweather and it seemed like Pacquiao had no chance to pull off an upset from the onset with the judges awarding the first three and last two rounds to the American. It was like they gave Mayweather an early cushion and made sure of the outcome with a late padding.

* * *

Did the fight actually preserve the integrity of the sport or did it contribute to its deterioration?

Firstly, the verdict was questionable. I thought it was close and could’ve gone either way. That was how trainer Freddie Roach and chief assistant Marvin Somodio saw it. I actually scored it for Pacquiao who was surprised that he lost. Sugar Shane Mosley and Evander Holyfield said Pacquiao had done enough to win.

Secondly, the disparity in the scores was unreal. How could Moretti have given Pacquiao only two rounds? Surely, Pacquiao deserved some credit for his aggressiveness.

Thirdly, it appeared that the cards were stacked against Pacquiao from the start as Mayweather was the lead promoter of the shebang. Mayweather controlled the show from when conditions were set for it to happen. Pacquiao had virtually no say on the terms of engagement.

In Kaczmarek’s booklet, he said a judge must be impartial, fully concentrated, objective and fair.

“Do not score on the basis of race, color or creed (and) do not be influenced by the location of the bout,” he said.

Kaczmarek said the basis factors used to score a round and ultimately a fight are clean punching, effective aggressiveness, ring generalship and defense.

“Boxing is a combative sport,” he said. “Getting off first, scoring clean punches in quantity and with quality, regardless of the direction the fighter is moving, should win the round.” He qualified that “simply moving forward without effective punching is not enough.”

Kaczmarek said “because of the combative nature of boxing, it would be difficult to award a round to a fighter who has not displayed a more effective offense than his opponent … a good defense simply can’t overcome an effective offense.”

* * *

Against Pacquiao, Mayweather resorted to holding down his head with a headlock or clipping his right hand while banging with his own right whenever they came dangerously close to each other.

“Holding is usually a last resort employed to avert aggressive tactics of an opponent,” said Kaczmarek. “Remember that holding and clinching are subject to penalty by the referee if abused. What is good defense? It is averting punches by blocking, bobbing and weaving, good footwork and lateral movement. These are assets possessed by the skilled fighter. In close rounds, when neither fighter has an edge offensively, good defense could well be the deciding factor.”

Kaczmarek said of the three basic fundamentals in scoring a fight, a combination of clean punching and effective aggressiveness are the key factors. “Whatever else is happening in the round, the fighter who is scoring clean solid punches, forcing the action and getting off first is going to win the round,” he said. “Skillful ring generalship which enables the fighter to control his opponent is also significant. Good fighters usually possess a combination of both clean punching/effective aggressiveness and ring generalship. They score points and ultimately win rounds.”

Mayweather was warned for holding, clinching and even low blows by referee Kenny Bayless but got away with running.

Pacquiao knew what Mayweather would do entering the fight. He was prepared to chase him down, cut the ring off and force an engagement. But with only one effective hand starting the third or fourth round, Pacquiao couldn’t execute the way he planned. Still, he was the aggressor.

The problem was the three judges weren’t impressed. In boxing, you win by boxing not by running or holding. Mayweather did little to preserve the integrity of the fight game.

In fact, he might have compromised it. He remains unbeaten with a 48-0 record but fans find it difficult to agree with his self-proclaimed declaration that he’s The Best Ever.


PHILSTAR

PHNO 'Must Read': Rematch looms but when? SPORTING CHANCE By Joaquin M. Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 7, 2015 - 12:00am


By Joaquin M. Henson

It’s hard enough to beat Floyd Mayweather, Jr. with two hands. But last weekend, Manny Pacquiao battled Mayweather with just one hand starting the third round after he hyperextended his previously injured right shoulder.

Despite the handicap, Pacquiao pursued Mayweather like a dog chasing a bone. He was clearly the aggressor as Mayweather reprised his role in “Dancing With the Stars” and did his best interpretation as a lover boy, demonstrating an embrace that put romantics to shame.

Compubox, the reliable gatherer of fight stats, came up with surprising figures in the end. Its owner and operator Bob Canobbio sat beside me on the first row at ringside during the bout. I was probably the first to see what numbers Canobbio wrote on the stats sheet.

Throughout the fight, Canobbio’s eyes were fixed on a screen monitor above a long desk in front of him showing the punches thrown and landed, broken down into jabs and power shots. He wrote down the numbers and connect rates then passed the sheet over to a staffer who made copies for media.

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I
couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw Canobbio’s numbers. Mayweather threw more punches than Pacquiao, 439 to 429 and his connect rate was much higher, 34 to 19 percent. In contrast, Pacquiao landed 229 of 669 against Chris Algieri last November and 198 of 563 against Timothy Bradley in their rematch in April last year.

So against Mayweather, Pacquiao – known as a volume puncher – threw 240 less and landed 148 less than when he battled Algieri. The stats confirmed Mayweather’s defensive ability – he’s just too difficult to tag.

By the way, I noticed a reproduced copy of a photo-shopped picture of Mayweather and Pacquiao taped on Canobbio’s notebook. It showed Mayweather looking like Satan and Pacquiao looking like Jesus. I asked Canobbio if I could take a picture of it with my phone. He asked why. I said I’d put it out on Instagram. He said no because “you don’t know how crazy some of Mayweather’s people are.” I left it at that.

The drop in Pacquiao’s workrate could only be explained by the injury in his right shoulder. He couldn’t catch Mayweather with only one hand. He needed to throw combinations, a right jab to set up his left straight. He needed to crumble Mayweather’s shoulder-roll defense by breaking it down with a right hook. He needed to cut the ring off on Mayweather by funneling him towards a spot where he could be caught with a right. None of those happened with any consistency. Without a right hand, Pacquiao was a one-armed warrior stalking a shadow in the ring.

* * * *

But even with just one hand, Pacquiao made a fight of it. I thought it was close and the decision could’ve gone either way. Sugar Shane Mosley thought Pacquiao had done enough to win. The three judges, however, weren’t impressed by Pacquiao’s aggressiveness and gave it to Mayweather by a wide margin. One awarded only two rounds for Pacquiao and the two others, four.

After the fight, Pacquiao revealed that he fought with an injured shoulder. Actually, he fought with a healed injured shoulder that was reinjured during the fight. Fans are now wondering if Pacquiao would’ve won a clear decision with two hands. If some observers like Mosley thought Pacquiao had done enough to win with one hand, imagine if he had fought with two?

An MRI has revealed a tear in Pacquiao’s rotator cuff and doctors are recommending repair surgery. It will take months of rehab to regain full extension of the right arm and it may take at least nine months before Pacquiao is able to box again.


After winning a unanimous decision against Manny Pacquiao on Saturday night in Las Vegas, Floyd Mayweather Jr. maintained that he only has one more fight left in his career before he retires. Shared by Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated.

Mayweather has a fight left on his Showtime contract valued at $200 to $250 Million. There is no fixed day when Mayweather will finish his six-fight obligation to the CBS-owned cable TV network but he has said he will pick a date in September. That’s only four months away. If there’s a rematch, Pacquiao won’t be ready until possibly, early next year. Mayweather, however, said he’ll wait for Pacquiao – even a year after he heals from surgery.

* * * *

At first, Mayweather wasn’t cool to the idea of a rematch. But probably after some thought, he’s warmed up to it. After all, is there anyone else out there who can deliver a big payday for Mayweather? If boxing is a business more than a sport to Mayweather, his primary consideration is how much he’ll earn from a fight, regardless of who’s in the opposite corner.

From the looks of things, there isn’t an opponent who can deliver cash to Mayweather more than last Saturday’s fight. Not even Pacquiao in a rematch. Fans felt short-changed paying $100 for a high-definition pay-per-view screening of an unexciting fight and they won’t be lured into coughing up as much money for a rematch unless there is a real possibility of Mayweather losing. But a Pacquiao rematch could bring in more cash to the bank than a Mayweather duel with Amir Khan or Keith Thurman or Kell Brook.

“Mayweather is invariably described as polarizing, a word that is as woefully noncomprehensive as it is factual,” wrote Tim Keown in ESPN the Magazine (May 11, 2015). “He is the greatest fighter of his generation. He is also a man whose eagerness to proclaim his own talent – he calls himself TBE for The Best Ever – and flaunt his extreme lifestyle has caused a good percentage of those who pay attention to boxing to revile him.

“His history of violence against women has triggered outright revulsion – three convictions, including one that landed him a two-month jail term in 2012 for misdemeanor domestic battery and harassment. Those who hate Mayweather don’t want to see him lose; they want to see him buried.” The anti-Mayweather crowd will still pay good money to watch him fight not because they want him to win but because they want to see him go down.


BLEACHERREPORT.COM

5 Boxers Who Can Save Boxing from Irrelevance By , Featured Columnist


SOLOBOXEO.COM by SALVADOR RODRIGUEZ ESPNDeportes.com the May 7, 2015 News MEXICO - One of the greatest heavyweight champions of all time, Evander Holyfield, refused to criticize Floyd Mayweather for the way he won last Saturday Manny Pacquiao, but launched strong challenges to boxing in general, the referees and judges rewarded today more to the defense than aggression. Evander-Holyfield-9342655-1-402About to turn 53, Holyfield is currently serving four years he retired, and was witness called by many as the 'fight of the century "between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd, and like many, was disappointed, but not the fight, which even he cataloged good, but the way boxing is conducted today.

On Wednesday, Evander Holyfield contributed a piece to The Players' Tribune about the lack of action in today's boxing world.

He stated: "The concept of fighting is simple: Hit the other guy and don’t let the other guy hit you.

Today, there’s a whole lot of trying not to get hit and not a whole lot of hitting. How can you have a boxing match if guys aren’t throwing and landing punches?"

The fight billed as "The Fight of the Century" pitting Floyd Mayweather against Manny Pacquiao may have been a huge let down to many fans. In the eyes of some fight fans, it may have tarnished the reputation of boxing, as Holyfield highlighted.

READ MORE...
Boxing aficionados may claim that those who do not appreciate the Mayweather style do not appreciate the sport.

There is no doubt Mayweather is a brilliant tactician, but Mayweather over the past few years has made his matches looking more like a business decision than a legendary fight to remember.

There will be no Mayweather fight that equates to Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier, "Marvelous" Marvin Hagler vs. Tommy Hearns or Arturo Gatti vs. Micky Ward.

Going back to the argument that Holyfield was making:

“ That used to be the mentality — boxers went into the ring to fight. They wanted to knock people out. They wanted to take the decision out of the judges hands. Today, instead of boxing for the knockout, fighters are boxing for the decision. Instead of fighting to win, they’re fighting not to lose and they’re getting rewarded for it. ”

While many of the fighters on the list have a high knockout win percentage, a win that ends in a decision doesn't mean a fight lacked in any excitement.

These are five fighters who can erase the sour taste from the disappointment of "The Fight of the Century" and bring some relevance to the sport again.

Here they are:

1.


According to Bleacher Report's Kelsey McCarson, if there is a fighter who could take the superstar crown post-Mayweather, it is Canelo Alvarez. 

2.


Outside the ring, Golovkin has a Pacquiao-like aura to him. He's humble, polite and always smiling. Overall, he's a really nice guy. 

3.


Crawford was ESPN's Fighter of the Year in 2014, and the Omaha-native has definitely arrived. 

4.


Keith Thurman: If there is someone who could beat Mayweather, it is definitely Keith Thurman (OK, I know you have heard that before). While he may not have the hand speed of Pacquiao, Thurman is a better technician and counterpuncher than the Pac-Man. He sets his punches up beautifully behind his jab, utilizes angles and has excellent head movement. 

5.

.
Deontay Wilder: Sure, he may have been criticized in Holyfield's article for not being more aggressive in his last fight against Bermane Stiverne, but in 33 fights, he has 32 knockouts.

Honorable Mention:


A Rematch Between Lucas Matthysse and Ruslan Provodnikov --This fight was supposed to whet our appetites for Mayweather/Pacquiao the following week. Instead, this fight eclipsed MayPac in action and came closer in earning the moniker of "Fight of the Century." The intense drama of the fight swung back and forth between both fighters, and it was just 12 rounds filled with blood and excitement. Matthysse eked out the majority decision (114-114, 115-113, 115-113).  


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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