PACQUIAO BREAKS NOSE OF SPARMATE  

OCT 29 --Manny Pacquiao is way ahead of schedule that after breaking the nose of his sparring partner, Freddie Roach decided to give his fighter a few days off in Hong Kong. “That’s why I want him to come to Hong Kong. We weren’t going to come because the fight is more important. But the thing is that we are way ahead of schedule,” Roach told the South China Morning Post. Pacquiao was in Hong Kong over the weekend and pressed flesh with his Pinoy fans. The trip was also designed to promote his Nov. 24 bout with Chris Algieri in nearby Macau. The 35-year-old Pacquiao is back in sparring in General Santos City and will have more than a couple more weeks before he flies to Macau for fight week.

“We still have three hard weeks of work in front of us. With three good sparring partners, it’s working out well. I have one more sparring partner coming over as a reserve, but I will use him as well,” Roach said. The extra sparring partner may be called in just in case Viktor Postol needs to have his broken nose fixed. Reports said Pacquiao broke the nose of the boxer born in Ukraine after hurting another sparring partner, Mike Jones. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Trainer says Algieri can KO Pacquiao  

Chris Algieri’s trainer just made a bold declaration that his ward can knock out Manny Pacquiao. A confident Tim Lane, Algieri’s chief trainer, told Victor Salazar of Tha Boxing Voice that a knockout victory for the New Yorker isn’t out of the question. This is despite Algieri being known more for his boxing skills than his power. Of his 20 wins, only 8 came by way of knockout. But Lane is upbeat on Algieri’s chances of stopping Pacquiao, saying their fight in Macau next month won’t even go to the scorecards. “Chris gets warm mid fight and picks up the pace. Chris Algieri will beat Manny Pacquiao November 22nd. He most certainly has a chance of stopping Pacquiao. I don’t expect it to go the distance,” Lane said.

Algieri is the current WBO light welterweight (140 lbs) champion but will meet Pacquiao at a catchweight of 144 pounds at the insistence of the Filipino’s camp. According to Lane, it is something that will work to Algieri’s advantage. “He’s [Algieri] a huge 140 pounder. His best weight is at 144 so right in between 140 and 147, which is where we’re going to meet, which is Chris’ best weight. I don’t know who chose this weight but they chose it perfectly for Chris. The catch weight played into our hands for sure,” the trainer continued. Algieri will be entering the fight as a huge underdog, the same state he was in before his breakthrough win over Ruslan Provodnikov in June. Both he and his trainer believes he can duplicate the feat against Pacquiao. “Welcome to the Chris Algieri Show. He went from 0-100 and he’s ready for Pacquiao,” said Lane. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT

ALSO: Pacquiao says Algieri ‘a big puzzle’  

OCT 29 ---PHOTO: Manny Pacquiao shakes hands with his fan during a promotional tour for his upcoming WBO welterweight boxing match, in Hong Kong, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Pacquiao will fight with Chris Algieri of the US in their WBO welterweight title bout in Macau on November 23. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung) MANILA, Philippines – When Manny Pacquiao locks horns with Chris Algieri on November 23 in Macau, the boxing icon thinks he’ll be in for some mind games as well. In an interview transcript published by ESPN.com, Pacquiao likened Algieri to a challenging puzzle that requires a lot of thinking to solve. "Chris Algieri poses many puzzles for me to solve. In terms of his height and reach, only Antonio Margarito surpasses him in the scope of opponents I have faced. Algieri is also the most scientific, fluid and fittest fighter I have ever opposed,” the fighting congressman said.

At 5-foot-10, the undefeated Algieri indeed dwarfs the 5-foot-6 Pacquiao while also enjoying a five-inch reach advantage (72” to 67”). Combine those with the New Yorker’s stiff jab and solid all-around boxing skills, then it can be a tough night for Pacquiao. “All of those factors, plus he is five years younger than me, make him the most dangerous opponent of my career,” he added. Pacquiao went on to say that boxing is also a thinking game, stressing the need for him to adjust to whatever Algieri brings to the table on fight day. "To me, boxing is a lot like chess. You don't just move a piece and wait for your opponent to respond, you have to see the board and think 10 to 12 moves ahead and anticipate the variables your opponent may counter with. Algieri does that and he does that very well,” he continued. The WBO welterweight champion will be entering the fight as a huge favorite, but he’s wary of Algieri’s propensity to buck the odds. In his last outing, the American pulled off a shocker against the heavily favored Ruslan Provodnikov to crown himself the WBO light welterweight champion. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Algieri ready and confident vs Pacquiao

NOVE 3 ---Three weeks before thier face off at around high noon in Macau (Saturday night in the US), Algieri said that he is looking forward to his coronation at The Venetian. “I feel way too confident. Way too confident,” Algieri, 30, said in a story that appeared over the weekend in Newsday, the main paper of his native Long Island, New York. Algieri was asked what things were keeping him preoccupied as his training for the Nov. 23 clash was about to reach its peak because he’d been reviewing Pacquiao’s last two fights the last few weeks, he answered that he has gone beyond watching videos. Weeks of seeing Pacquiao flash his lightning-quick reflexes and dominate Brandon Rios and Tim Bradley has left him sick and tired of watching the Filipino dynamo.

Algieri swears he has already mastered the gameplan and he is itching to execute it to perfection at the CotaiArena. Even one of his trainers believes Algieri is not only ready to rumble physically but raring to do it mentally. Keith Trimble, who shares the training duties with long-time cornerman Tim Lane, also told Newsday that Algieri is “so mentally tough that you can’t frustrate him, you can’t get in his head, you can’t psych him out.”  Going into the final weeks before the big day, both camps have been exchanging barbs with Mike Koncz, Pacquiao’s Canadian adviser boasting that the fight won’t go past six rounds. Even Algieri’s promoter, Joe DeGuardia, was caught up with all the hoopla as well, saying that they are very much willing to give Pacquiao a rematch in 2015. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Chris Algieri forced to vacate 140 pound belt for Pacquiao fight 

Chris Algieri is no longer the WBO junior welterweight champion, a surprising move that could signal the sanctioning body hedging their bets at 140 and 147 on Manny Pacquiao. The WBO announced at its convention this week that junior welterweight titlist Chris Algieri would have to relinquish his title because of his welterweight title fight with Manny Pacquiao on November 22 in Macau, which will air on HBO pay-per-view. Algieri (20-0, 8 KO) won the belt from Ruslan Provodnikov in one of the year's more notable upsets, which opened him up to the Pacquiao bout, and eventually landed him the opportunity of a lifetime.

The move by the WBO to strip Algieri of the belt without allowing him to defend, while also sanctioning the welterweight title fight with Manny, is controversial at best. Usually in a circumstance like this, where the sanctioning body controls both of the belts in question, the fighter in Algieri's position would be given time to decide which belt to keep, at the very least, should he beat Pacquiao and win a title in a second weight class. And more often than not, that fighter is also then open to return to defending the title in the lower weight class. Floyd Mayweather currently holds the WBA and WBC junior middleweight titles, but hasn't defended his WBA belt at 154 pounds since he won it against Canelo Alvarez in September 2013. The WBA does have a "regular" titleholder in the division, which is Erislandy Lara, who fought Alvarez at a catchweight in a non-title bout in July. Lara still has his belt, and will defend it on December 12 against Ishe Smith. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Chris Algieri not worried about judges against Pacquiao 

NOV 2 ---PHOTO: Chris Algieri speaks with Marcos Villegas of Fight Hub TV about his upcoming fight with Manny Pacquiao. Now it's the final stages. What's the difference between the beginning of camp and these final stages? "The beginning of camp is a lot of strength work, a lot of conditioning, more basic stuff. Then we started to build on technique and strategy. This part is just sparring, which is actually my favorite part. It's definitely the most difficult, it wears on your body, because sparring is tough. But I actually look forward to my sparring sessions." Has it been hard to simulate a guy like Manny?

"There's only one Manny Pacquiao. There's nobody out there that fights like him. But we can take different aspects of his style and find partners that have done that. We have. My coaches have done a great job doing that. Every session we're just trying to accomplish certain goals, and little check-offs as we go from week-to-week, and put it all together. Fight night will be the finished product." What makes your approach different from other fighters? "I don't concentrate too much on my opponents. I really focus on myself inwardly and think about what my job is. I'm not really concerned about what they're doing. My job is every day. Every session for me is important. And when you have two sessions a day, it's a lot of mental preparation every single day. I don't think too far ahead, think about what my opponent is doing, because I don't have time for that. I gotta focus on what I have. I think that may be a little different from a lot of other athletes, who may really be concerned about their opponent, really focused in on what their opponent is up to."  * READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Pacquiao breaks nose of sparmate

MANILA, NOVEMBER 3, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Abac Cordero - Manny Pacquiao is way ahead of schedule that after breaking the nose of his sparring partner, Freddie Roach decided to give his fighter a few days off in Hong Kong.

“That’s why I want him to come to Hong Kong. We weren’t going to come because the fight is more important. But the thing is that we are way ahead of schedule,” Roach told the South China Morning Post.

Pacquiao was in Hong Kong over the weekend and pressed flesh with his Pinoy fans. The trip was also designed to promote his Nov. 24 bout with Chris Algieri in nearby Macau.

The 35-year-old Pacquiao is back in sparring in General Santos City and will have more than a couple more weeks before he flies to Macau for fight week.

“We still have three hard weeks of work in front of us. With three good sparring partners, it’s working out well. I have one more sparring partner coming over as a reserve, but I will use him as well,” Roach said.

The extra sparring partner may be called in just in case Viktor Postol needs to have his broken nose fixed.

Reports said Pacquiao broke the nose of the boxer born in Ukraine after hurting another sparring partner, Mike Jones.

* Roach had earlier pronounced that these sparring partners that he brought in from Los Angeles are better than Algieri himself.

“The thing is I have my number one contender from Ukraine and he’s a very good boxer and he could beat Algieri right now,” said Roach.

Pacquiao is in such terrific shape.

“We were sparring 12 rounds in the mitts. Pacquiao wasn’t even breathing heavy. His condition is terrific right now,” said the celebrated trainer.

Postol, the top contender in the light-welterweight class, hurt his nose inside the ring against Pacquiao but Roach said the former has no plans of going home.

“Manny broke Postol’s nose three days ago. But Postol’s okay. I train him. He’s a fighter, he’s a tough kid and he’s not going home,” Roach told the South China Morning Post.

Pacquiao (56-5-2), who has won titles in a record eight different weight classes, suffered successive defeats in 2012 but has got back on track with two impressive wins over Brandon Rios and Timothy Bradley.

A win over former kickboxer Algieri could bring the long-awaited super fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr one step closer.

The 30-year-old Algieri has a 20-0 professional record and won the WBO light-welterweight title last month by a split decision against Russia’s Ruslan Provodnikov.

Pacquiao has not scored a knockout since stopping Miguel Cotto in Nov. 2009, and was himself knocked out by Juan Manuel Marquez in 2012 in his first outing after losing to Bradley the same year.

While some have questioned how much gas Pacquiao has left after 63 professional fights, Roach said Pacquiao was way ahead of schedule.

“Manny Pacquiao is in great shape. Our strength coach came in 10 days before me. He started working him and by the time I worked with him, we were sparring 12 rounds in the mitts,” he added.

“Pacquiao wasn’t even breathing heavy. His condition is terrific right now.” – With report from Reuters

Trainer says Algieri can KO Pacquiao By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated October 29, 2014 - 3:49pm 0 0 googleplus0 0


WBO Welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao, left, of the Philippines, and WBO junior welterweight champion Chris Algieri of United States, right, pose for photographers during a news conference in Macau, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. The boxers are scheduled to battle in WBO welterweight title match at The Venetian Macao on Nov. 23 in Macau. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

MANILA, Philippines – Chris Algieri’s trainer just made a bold declaration that his ward can knock out Manny Pacquiao.

A confident Tim Lane, Algieri’s chief trainer, told Victor Salazar of Tha Boxing Voice that a knockout victory for the New Yorker isn’t out of the question.

This is despite Algieri being known more for his boxing skills than his power. Of his 20 wins, only 8 came by way of knockout.

But Lane is upbeat on Algieri’s chances of stopping Pacquiao, saying their fight in Macau next month won’t even go to the scorecards.

“Chris gets warm mid fight and picks up the pace. Chris Algieri will beat Manny Pacquiao November 22nd. He most certainly has a chance of stopping Pacquiao. I don’t expect it to go the distance,” Lane said.

Algieri is the current WBO light welterweight (140 lbs) champion but will meet Pacquiao at a catchweight of 144 pounds at the insistence of the Filipino’s camp. According to Lane, it is something that will work to Algieri’s advantage.

“He’s [Algieri] a huge 140 pounder. His best weight is at 144 so right in between 140 and 147, which is where we’re going to meet, which is Chris’ best weight. I don’t know who chose this weight but they chose it perfectly for Chris. The catch weight played into our hands for sure,” the trainer continued.

Algieri will be entering the fight as a huge underdog, the same state he was in before his breakthrough win over Ruslan Provodnikov in June. Both he and his trainer believes he can duplicate the feat against Pacquiao.

“Welcome to the Chris Algieri Show. He went from 0-100 and he’s ready for Pacquiao,” said Lane.

Pacquiao says Algieri ‘a big puzzle’ By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated October 29, 2014 - 2:10pm 0 51 googleplus0 0


Manny Pacquiao shakes hands with his fan during a promotional tour for his upcoming WBO welterweight boxing match, in Hong Kong, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Pacquiao will fight with Chris Algieri of the US in their WBO welterweight title bout in Macau on November 23. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

MANILA, Philippines – When Manny Pacquiao locks horns with Chris Algieri on November 23 in Macau, the boxing icon thinks he’ll be in for some mind games as well.

In an interview transcript published by ESPN.com, Pacquiao likened Algieri to a challenging puzzle that requires a lot of thinking to solve.

"Chris Algieri poses many puzzles for me to solve. In terms of his height and reach, only Antonio Margarito surpasses him in the scope of opponents I have faced. Algieri is also the most scientific, fluid and fittest fighter I have ever opposed,” the fighting congressman said.

At 5-foot-10, the undefeated Algieri indeed dwarfs the 5-foot-6 Pacquiao while also enjoying a five-inch reach advantage (72” to 67”). Combine those with the New Yorker’s stiff jab and solid all-around boxing skills, then it can be a tough night for Pacquiao.

“All of those factors, plus he is five years younger than me, make him the most dangerous opponent of my career,” he added.

Pacquiao went on to say that boxing is also a thinking game, stressing the need for him to adjust to whatever Algieri brings to the table on fight day.

"To me, boxing is a lot like chess. You don't just move a piece and wait for your opponent to respond, you have to see the board and think 10 to 12 moves ahead and anticipate the variables your opponent may counter with. Algieri does that and he does that very well,” he continued.

The WBO welterweight champion will be entering the fight as a huge favorite, but he’s wary of Algieri’s propensity to buck the odds. In his last outing, the American pulled off a shocker against the heavily favored Ruslan Provodnikov to crown himself the WBO light welterweight champion.

* In that fight, Algieri dusted himself off after two first round knockdowns to outbox the heavy-handed Provodnikov en route to the upset win – which eventually earned him the ticket to face Pacquiao.

“If you look at his recent fights – against Mike Arnaoutis, Emanuel Taylor and Ruslan Provodnikov – each victory for him was considered an upset,” Pacquiao recounted.

“Yet Algieri never considered himself an underdog, he went into each fight confident and with the right game plan and no matter what happened in the ring, he was disciplined enough to stay with that game plan. And it worked. He outfought them and out-thought them.”

To come out victorious, Pacquiao knows he has to break through Algieri’s defense, which will compounded by his advantages in height and reach.

"Algieri's reach and height will require me to work on closing the distance with him in the ring and I will need my speed more than ever to be able to score damaging blows to him while avoiding his own counters,” he detailed.

“I watched him fight Provodnikov and he fought the perfect fight against him. But I do not intend to fight Algieri's fight. I intend on fighting my fight and more importantly, making him fight my fight. This will be a battle of wills as much as it will be a battle of blows There will be a lot more going on in the ring than fans will realize, and it will be fast and it will be exciting.”

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Algieri ready and confident vs Pacquiao by Nick Giongco November 2, 2014 Share this: Moving pictures of himself toying with Manny Pacquiao are beginning to appear in Chris Algieri’s head.

Three weeks before thier face off at around high noon in Macau (Saturday night in the US), Algieri said that he is looking forward to his coronation at The Venetian.

“I feel way too confident. Way too confident,” Algieri, 30, said in a story that appeared over the weekend in Newsday, the main paper of his native Long Island, New York.

Algieri was asked what things were keeping him preoccupied as his training for the Nov. 23 clash was about to reach its peak because he’d been reviewing Pacquiao’s last two fights the last few weeks, he answered that he has gone beyond watching videos.

Weeks of seeing Pacquiao flash his lightning-quick reflexes and dominate Brandon Rios and Tim Bradley has left him sick and tired of watching the Filipino dynamo.

Algieri swears he has already mastered the gameplan and he is itching to execute it to perfection at the CotaiArena.

Even one of his trainers believes Algieri is not only ready to rumble physically but raring to do it mentally.

Keith Trimble, who shares the training duties with long-time cornerman Tim Lane, also told Newsday that Algieri is “so mentally tough that you can’t frustrate him, you can’t get in his head, you can’t psych him out.”

Going into the final weeks before the big day, both camps have been exchanging barbs with Mike Koncz, Pacquiao’s Canadian adviser boasting that the fight won’t go past six rounds.

Even Algieri’s promoter, Joe DeGuardia, was caught up with all the hoopla as well, saying that they are very much willing to give Pacquiao a rematch in 2015.

FROM BADLEFTHOOK.COM

Chris Algieri forced to vacate 140 pound belt for Pacquiao fight
By Scott Christ  @scottchristBLH on Nov 2 2014, 2:00a 32

FROM ChinaFotoPress

Chris Algieri is no longer the WBO junior welterweight champion, a surprising move that could signal the sanctioning body hedging their bets at 140 and 147 on Manny Pacquiao.

The WBO announced at its convention this week that junior welterweight titlist Chris Algieri would have to relinquish his title because of his welterweight title fight with Manny Pacquiao on November 22 in Macau, which will air on HBO pay-per-view.

Algieri (20-0, 8 KO) won the belt from Ruslan Provodnikov in one of the year's more notable upsets, which opened him up to the Pacquiao bout, and eventually landed him the opportunity of a lifetime.

The move by the WBO to strip Algieri of the belt without allowing him to defend, while also sanctioning the welterweight title fight with Manny, is controversial at best. Usually in a circumstance like this, where the sanctioning body controls both of the belts in question, the fighter in Algieri's position would be given time to decide which belt to keep, at the very least, should he beat Pacquiao and win a title in a second weight class.

And more often than not, that fighter is also then open to return to defending the title in the lower weight class. Floyd Mayweather currently holds the WBA and WBC junior middleweight titles, but hasn't defended his WBA belt at 154 pounds since he won it against Canelo Alvarez in September 2013. The WBA does have a "regular" titleholder in the division, which is Erislandy Lara, who fought Alvarez at a catchweight in a non-title bout in July. Lara still has his belt, and will defend it on December 12 against Ishe Smith.

* The WBA and WBO are not the same, of course, but it's worth noting that back in 2010, Pacquiao was in a similar spot. He held the WBO welterweight title, which he'd won from Miguel Cotto in November 2009. He defended that in March 2010 against Joshua Clottey, then moved up for a junior middleweight title fight against Antonio Margarito in November 2010.

The Pacquiao-Margarito fight was contested at a 150-pound catchweight, with the vacant WBC title at stake. But Pacquiao was never stripped of his title, and after winning and immediately vacating the WBC 154-pound title, Pacquiao returned to defending his WBO welterweight belt in 2011.

Pacquiao's fights are worth a lot more money than Algieri's, of course, so the feeling might be that since Algieri is likely to lose to Pacquiao -- those are the odds, anyway -- they might as well move the 140-pound title belt off of him, too. It's a pretty surprising move overall, and one that kind of screws Algieri, but hopefully at the very least, he'll get a shot to regain that belt if he does lose to Pacquiao and wants to move back down.

Of course, Pacquiao's team has also talked about moving down to 140 pounds again if he beats Algieri and feels good at the 144-pound catchweight, so it's also very possible that if Manny beats Algieri and moves down, he'll immediately fight someone for the vacant WBO junior welterweight title.

Chris Algieri not worried about judges against Pacquiao By Scott Christ @scottchristBLH on Oct 29 2014, 3:33p 126


Chris Algieri speaks with Marcos Villegas of Fight Hub TV about his upcoming fight with Manny Pacquiao.

Now it's the final stages. What's the difference between the beginning of camp and these final stages?

"The beginning of camp is a lot of strength work, a lot of conditioning, more basic stuff. Then we started to build on technique and strategy. This part is just sparring, which is actually my favorite part. It's definitely the most difficult, it wears on your body, because sparring is tough. But I actually look forward to my sparring sessions."

Has it been hard to simulate a guy like Manny?

"There's only one Manny Pacquiao. There's nobody out there that fights like him. But we can take different aspects of his style and find partners that have done that. We have. My coaches have done a great job doing that. Every session we're just trying to accomplish certain goals, and little check-offs as we go from week-to-week, and put it all together. Fight night will be the finished product."

What makes your approach different from other fighters?

"I don't concentrate too much on my opponents. I really focus on myself inwardly and think about what my job is. I'm not really concerned about what they're doing. My job is every day. Every session for me is important. And when you have two sessions a day, it's a lot of mental preparation every single day. I don't think too far ahead, think about what my opponent is doing, because I don't have time for that. I gotta focus on what I have. I think that may be a little different from a lot of other athletes, who may really be concerned about their opponent, really focused in on what their opponent is up to." *

* This could go 12 rounds in a place that's not home for you in China. I know you want to be able to dominate and impose your game plan, but it is Manny Pacquiao. Given that, are you worried about the judges?

"I'm not really overly concerned about that. I'm just focused on doing what I need to do. I think if I go out there and I win every round the way I'm planning to or want to, then it can't be close. I don't plan for close fights. I plan for tough fights, but not for close fights. I'm going out there to win every round. That's how I approach every fight. This fight is not any different than any other fight in my career. I don't want close fights. I want to dominate fights."

Have you already pictured every single round of that fight?

"Not all the way through! With my coaches, we're only in the first half of the fight so far. We might be at four or five right now. But different parts of a fight are different fights. You've really got to prepare for every phase. Our sparring will coincide with that as well, and the strategy will change, and the different things we work on camp. My coaches are very, very specific."

I know you were a pro kickboxer, what's harder? Kickboxing or boxing?

"The talent pool in boxing is so much bigger that the talent is higher. Much, much higher. But in terms of technique, I mean kickboxing has more weapons. It's not just left hand and right hand, it's left leg and right foot, and kicking's hard."

What do you feel has translated from kickboxing to boxing?

"I definitely had to change a lot of things technically and physically, but I think the preparation, like, the lifestyle leading up to a fight and training camps, and the whole idea of the one-on-one aspect. It's a fight! This is a fight, it's not a game. Neither one of those sports are games. I didn't play kickboxing, and you don't play boxing. That mental edge has been the biggest part of helping me in boxing."

Was MMA ever on your mind?

"No, because I grew up a boxing fan. I grew up watching boxing champions. I wanted to be a boxing champion, and for me there was no MMA when I was a kid, so there was no drive to want to be a UFC or MMA fighter."

Maybe in the future?

"No. I think boxing is the top of combat sports. I really do. It's the prettiest and the best and the most highly skilled. So there's no reason for me to backtrack."


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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