GILAS PLAYERS WARN PBA-BOUND PACQUIAO: 'EXPECT TOUGHEST BAPTISM OF FIRE IN YOUR PBA CAREER'  

Gilas Pilipinas players intend to go hard on boxing idol Manny Pacquiao to test his competence in their coming PBA encounters. If Pacquiao is not good enough to play pro ball, Gilas players said they would make Pacquiao feel it for his own good and the dignity of professional basketball players. No one seems to be excited to play the eight-division boxing champ on the hard court. “We have talked a lot about that in Spain. The concession is that if Pacquiao can really play, well and good. If not, he can expect the toughest baptism of fire in his life,” said Gary David. “As for myself, I really intend to defend him very hard in the event we’re matched up with one another. Jayson (Castro) and LA (Tenorio) were saying they will steal the ball on him,” David also said. The Gilas players insist they’re not against Pacquiao playing in the PBA if he’s really competent to play pro ball. “If not, that’s the problem. Don’t expect us to go easy on him,” said a Gilas veteran. “We don’t want a bad precedent set. We’re thinking after him, there might be those rich basketball-crazy guys, not really deserving, saying ‘pwede pa lang pasukin ang PBA ng ganon-ganon lang eh. Sali na rin ako dyan,’” the same player said. “The bottom line is that we want to protect our profession. We want only the deserving guys to be in there,” another Gilas player said. “Of course, we have our own reputation to protect. I can’t allow Manny to shoot on me. I will block his shots,” said yet another Gilas player. “What if he keeps shooting on me or on everyone, we face the consequence of sitting on the bench.” *READ MORE...

ALSO: The Aftermath – Gilas Pilipinas moving forward  

PHOTO: 2014 FIBA World Cup Gilas huddle vs Croatia --The stint of Gilas Pilipinas in the 2014 FIBA World Cup has ended. Our team represented our country with their heads held high despite only winning one game. We may not have gone into the second round but we showed the entire world who we are. After Gilas provided us with a couple of days of euphoria and magic, we now have to look at what’s going to happen next. We have to regroup as a basketball nation and see the things that we did right and what we can do to improve. We know who we are ---First thing’s first: let’s all agree that the identity of Philippine basketball has been solidified in the World Cup. We know who we are. We know what style of basketball we want to employ. In the first game against Croatia we looked like we were just happy to be back on the global stage. Even though there were instances of good ball movement and penetration, it wasn’t enough. In our games against Argentina and Puerto Rico however, I saw Gilas in a whole new light. In the next couple of games in the tournament, we evolved into a mean, lean-running and gunning-dribble driving-three point bonanza-HOMAYGOODNESS basketball team. It wasn’t anymore just Jayson Castro of Talk ‘N Text or LA Tenorio of Barangay Ginebra. They were working as one. The team played basketball not as individuals anymore but as a well-oiled machine. The names on the back seemed irrelevant, while the country in front proved to be what mattered most. But let’s talk basketball for a bit. Our offense can be summarized into this: dribble drive penetration-pass-pump fake-cut-pass-screen-drive-weave-pass-three points. It was soooo beautiful and fun to watch. We finally utilized all our strengths in the international stage. Speed? Check. Ball movement? Of course. Shooting? Did you watch Jimmy Alapag? * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: Blatche out of Asiad; SBP mulls pullout  

The Olympic Council of Asia yesterday slammed the door on Andray Blatche suiting up for Gilas Pilipinas in the coming Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea. Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas vice chairman Ricky Vargas said the OCA decision came in the form of an e-mail sent by Haider Farman of the Asian Games department of OCA. In a hastily-called press conference in Makati, Vargas said it seemed that the OCA decision is final. “Yes, I think it’s with finality,” said Vargas. However, the SBP headed by Manny V. Pangilinan isn’t giving up, saying he will personally meet with OCA officials tomorrow in Incheon, venue of the Asian from Sept. 19 to Oct. 4. Vargas said they will give it “one last try.” If it fails, Gilas will consider fielding another naturalized player, Marcus Douthit, in Incheon, where the Philippines is out to end a long and medal drought. Gilas might also consider pulling out of the basketball competitions in Incheon, which literally means “kind river,” or seek help from the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Geneva. Boycotting the basketball competitions in Incheon will be like sending a strong message to the organizers as well as the Olympic Council of Asia. “Di naman dapat tayo magpapa-api (We should not get trampled on), said Vargas. “Anong tumutulak sa atin? We want to be able to send the best team we can give, for the Filipinos and for basketball, to fight for the gold medal. Yan and tumutulak sa atin,” he added.

“We cannot just not try and allow these things to happen without fighting for our rights,” the SBP official said. Blatche, who played for the Brooklyn Nets in the NBA, became a naturalized Filipino last June, and was able to play for Gilas in the still ongoing FIBA World Cup in Spain. But Incheon organizers said OCA’s rules are different from FIBA’s. For the Asian Games, naturalized players need a three-year residency before they are allowed to see action. Patrick Baumann, FIBA secretary-general, wrote Incheon the other day questioning its decision to declare Blatch ineligible to play in the Asian Games when the NBA star just saw action for Gilas in Spain. However, the FIBA message fell on deaf ears. Now, Gilas will give it one last try to convince OCA and the organizers to let Blatche in. Moying Martelino, former secretary-general of the Asian Basketball Confederation and now SBP consultant, will leave for Incheon tomorrow. Joining Martelino in the negotiating team is Richie Garcia, Philippine Sports Commission chairman and chef-de-mission of the Pinoy delegation to this year’s Asiad. Philippine Olympic Committee president Jose Cojuangco said he’s with SBP in this battle but reserved further comment.THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Gilas 5 still a force sans Blatche 

PHOTO: Cone --WITH or without naturalized center Andray Blatche, the Philippines will still be a force to reckon with in the basketball competitions of the upcoming Asian Games. No less than grand slam coach Tim Cone gave this assessment when asked about the country’s chances in basketball, which will most likely play without its prized recruit. While he believes that Blatche was a major factor in making Gilas Pilipinas play competitive basketball during the FIBA World Cup, the team’s performance was not really anchored on the American’s presence. “Andray is a great player and he changes the way we play, but I’m not sure that we really need him that badly. I think we could do really well in the Asian Games without him. Especially if Marcus Douthit plays,” said Cone.

The Nationals ended their FIBA World Cup campaign with a solitary win in five games, with three of the four losses deemed winnable if not for some endgame errors. Making its first World championship appearance after a 36-year hiatus, the Nationals were supposed to be manhandled by the opposition, owing to its long absence from the sport’s most prestigious tournament. Recently, the Incheon Asian Games Organizing Committee, citing a specific rule set by the Olympic Council of Asia regarding naturalized players, has disqualified Blatche from the country’s basketball roster because of residency issue. Under the OCA rules, a naturalized player is required to reside for a minimum of 36 months in their adopted country. Blatche, who averaged 21.2 points and a team-best 13.8 rebounds during his Gilas stint, got his Philippine citizenship last June. “He gave great confidence to the team, but there were times when he was on the court, we played much better without him. Still, that’s only for short stretches and you’re talking about a 40-minute game,” said Cone. *READ MORE...

ALSO: Mayweather to retire in 2015, denies negotiating with Pacquiao 

Floyd Mayweather says he will fight for one more year before hanging up his gloves. Mayweather, still undefeated after 46 outings, confirmed he will quit boxing in 2015 after two more fights, which are part of his lucrative six-bout deal with broadcaster Showtime. "I only got two more fights left (after Saturday) and after the next two fights I just want to build the Mayweather Promotions brand,” the American boxer said in a report by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael. Mayweather will take on Marcos Maidana in rematch Sunday, his fourth fight under Showtime, then plans to see action again in May and September next year before finally calling it quits. It’s a schedule he vowed to stick to. "My next fight is in May and my last fight is in September, so a year from now will be my last fight,” Mayweather said, refusing to state his preferred opponents. "As of right now, my focus is on Maidana. I can't focus on the other two fights after that. I have to focus on Maidana. After that we can't say who's the next two are going to be but I'm pretty sure the next two will be exciting fights," the boxer added. *READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Gilas players warn PBA-bound Pacquiao: 'Expect toughest baptism of fire in your PBA career!


Players of Gilas Pilipinas warn Manny Pacquiao (inset) to 'expect the toughest baptism of fire in his life' as he embarks on a career in the PBA.

MANILA, SEPTEMBER 15, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Nelson Beltran - Gilas Pilipinas players intend to go hard on boxing idol Manny Pacquiao to test his competence in their coming PBA encounters.

If Pacquiao is not good enough to play pro ball, Gilas players said they would make Pacquiao feel it for his own good and the dignity of professional basketball players.

No one seems to be excited to play the eight-division boxing champ on the hard court.

“We have talked a lot about that in Spain. The concession is that if Pacquiao can really play, well and good. If not, he can expect the toughest baptism of fire in his life,” said Gary David.

“As for myself, I really intend to defend him very hard in the event we’re matched up with one another. Jayson (Castro) and LA (Tenorio) were saying they will steal the ball on him,” David also said.

The Gilas players insist they’re not against Pacquiao playing in the PBA if he’s really competent to play pro ball.

“If not, that’s the problem. Don’t expect us to go easy on him,” said a Gilas veteran.

“We don’t want a bad precedent set. We’re thinking after him, there might be those rich basketball-crazy guys, not really deserving, saying ‘pwede pa lang pasukin ang PBA ng ganon-ganon lang eh. Sali na rin ako dyan,’” the same player said.

“The bottom line is that we want to protect our profession. We want only the deserving guys to be in there,” another Gilas player said.

“Of course, we have our own reputation to protect. I can’t allow Manny to shoot on me. I will block his shots,” said yet another Gilas player. “What if he keeps shooting on me or on everyone, we face the consequence of sitting on the bench.”

* The other PBA players should have the same thing in mind so Pacquiao must really prepare himself the best he can before pushing through with his plan to play pro ball.

There’s no word yet on when does Pacquiao plan to make his PBA debut since he’s busy promoting his November fight against Chris Algieri.

If plans don’t miscarry, the PBA is holding the opening of its grand 40th season at the 50,000-seater Philippine Arena in Bocaue in October, pitting Kia Motors versus Blackwater then Barangay Ginebra against Talk n Text.

With Pacquiao busy on his boxing commitment, assistant coach Glenn Capacio is the main man handling Kia’s buildup for its PBA debut.

Kia is still in the process of forming its team to be led by playing coach Pacquiao, the 11th pick overall in the last PBA draft.

FROM SLAMONLINEPH.COM

The Aftermath – Gilas Pilipinas moving forward By Yoyo Sarmenta Share Button TwitterFacebookGoogle PlusPinterest


2014 FIBA World Cup Gilas huddle vs Croatia

The stint of Gilas Pilipinas in the 2014 FIBA World Cup has ended. Our team represented our country with their heads held high despite only winning one game. We may not have gone into the second round but we showed the entire world who we are.

After Gilas provided us with a couple of days of euphoria and magic, we now have to look at what’s going to happen next. We have to regroup as a basketball nation and see the things that we did right and what we can do to improve.

We know who we are

First thing’s first: let’s all agree that the identity of Philippine basketball has been solidified in the World Cup. We know who we are. We know what style of basketball we want to employ.

In the first game against Croatia we looked like we were just happy to be back on the global stage. Even though there were instances of good ball movement and penetration, it wasn’t enough. In our games against Argentina and Puerto Rico however, I saw Gilas in a whole new light.

In the next couple of games in the tournament, we evolved into a mean, lean-running and gunning-dribble driving-three point bonanza-HOMAYGOODNESS basketball team.

It wasn’t anymore just Jayson Castro of Talk ‘N Text or LA Tenorio of Barangay Ginebra. They were working as one. The team played basketball not as individuals anymore but as a well-oiled machine. The names on the back seemed irrelevant, while the country in front proved to be what mattered most.

But let’s talk basketball for a bit. Our offense can be summarized into this: dribble drive penetration-pass-pump fake-cut-pass-screen-drive-weave-pass-three points. It was soooo beautiful and fun to watch. We finally utilized all our strengths in the international stage. Speed? Check. Ball movement? Of course. Shooting? Did you watch Jimmy Alapag?

* Granted, we still have a lot to improve on, like shooting more consistently, or the squad’s overpassing, but it was beyond awesome to see our national team at work. Our defense might still be in a bad place right now, but at least now we know what we’re up against. Next time around, I’m sure our boys will adjust and close out on those European or African shooters better.

We’re not just a bunch of six-something feet players running around and depending on a naturalized behemoth to save us. No, we’re a damn fine basketball team. Finally we can say, this is our brand of basketball.


Andray Blatche - 2014 FIBA World Cup

Everybody has a say

After our loss versus Puerto Rico, there were a lot of different comments against Gilas. Bakit talo na naman? Bakit hindi nilaro si ganyan? Sana iba yung ginawa nila sa ganito.

On one hand, my basketball mind wants to go berserk and battle every negative comment against Gilas. Some points had no basis and made you say to yourself, “Seryoso ka ba?”

However, even though there’s a time to debate and even argue with different basketball pundits and so-called experts, I do appreciate everything that’s been said. For one, it shows that the Philippines really, and I mean really, cares about competing and winning in the World Cup. I’m glad that we’ve gone from one of those “just happy to be in Spain” teams into “you better watch out for us” teams. From being just content, we became hungry. From simply caring about them, we became overly attached and cared too much till it hurt. From saying “Sana manalo” it became “Dapat panalo na yun eh!!!” I do appreciate the comments, both the good and the bad because it means that we’re serious. The Philippines loves basketball so much and sometimes that love breeds different views from various people.

Moving forward

Despite appreciating the comments of everyone, I’m afraid that they might somehow negatively influence the team.

The most important thing right now is the leadership of the Gilas program. Manny V. Pangilinan and Coach Chot Reyes should stand firm with the team they built for Spain.

What I’m afraid of is that some people might overreact and suggest something crazy. Like what you ask? Oh I don’t know, maybe someone says that Coach Chot should be replaced. Or what if somebody opposes our dribble drive offense? What if somebody says getting Andray Blatche was a stupid move and we shouldn’t get a naturalized player anymore? What if other PBA teams still don’t want their players competing for Gilas kasi matatalo lang naman? Of course these may seem far-fetched and even stupid, but hey, anything can happen and I’m scared some of our basketball officials might do something irrational.

It’s essential to have consistency in our program, win or lose. Take a look at what Team USA has been doing over the years. Forget first that they’re huge, athletic, and NBA players. Take a look at their program, at what they’ve built over time through hard work and scouting. Jerry Colangelo, the mastermind behind Team USA’s roster changes and whatnot, and Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski have been consistent in what they are trying to build every time the US competes internationally. Despite the numerous roster changes and loss of superstars, they’re confident of Team USA’s chances because they trust in their system. In turn, the player themselves buy into that system. Even though they don’t have Kevin Durant right now, their style of driving in the lane and dishing to the perimeter is still evident. Just ask Steph Curry and his three-point shooting.

The same should apply for our Gilas Pilipinas. There are reasons why Coach Chot picked those twelve players. It’s not just talent or statistics, he was looking for a team that would gel and would utilize our style of play. That’s why he got a lot of shooters and that’s why he got big men who could do multiple things on the floor. Moving forward, we can be assured that we can still compete against the Europeans, South Americans, and Asians because Coach Chot and Gilas have built a reliable system that we can improve on.

Yes, Gilas Pilipinas has a lot to work on in the next couple of months. Being at the World Cup should be just a first step to something more. We should be grateful and proud of our boys but I also understand the desire of everyone to want to do better next time. There’s a fine line between support and criticism. For now, we are left with memories of those ill-fated but glorious days. For now at least, we know who we are as a basketball team. For now, let everybody say what they want because we can only hope that we’ll improve given those comments, both the good and the bad. For now, let’s be thankful for what MVP, Coach Chot, and the rest of the players have sacrificed for. Photos from FIBA.com

FROM PHILSTAR

Blatche out of Asiad; SBP mulls pullout By Abac Cordero (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 9, 2014 - 12:00am 1 1037 googleplus0 0

MANILA, Philippines - The Olympic Council of Asia yesterday slammed the door on Andray Blatche suiting up for Gilas Pilipinas in the coming Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea.

Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas vice chairman Ricky Vargas said the OCA decision came in the form of an e-mail sent by Haider Farman of the Asian Games department of OCA.

In a hastily-called press conference in Makati, Vargas said it seemed that the OCA decision is final.

“Yes, I think it’s with finality,” said Vargas.

However, the SBP headed by Manny V. Pangilinan isn’t giving up, saying he will personally meet with OCA officials tomorrow in Incheon, venue of the Asian from Sept. 19 to Oct. 4.

Vargas said they will give it “one last try.”

If it fails, Gilas will consider fielding another naturalized player, Marcus Douthit, in Incheon, where the Philippines is out to end a long and medal drought.

Gilas might also consider pulling out of the basketball competitions in Incheon, which literally means “kind river,” or seek help from the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Geneva.

Boycotting the basketball competitions in Incheon will be like sending a strong message to the organizers as well as the Olympic Council of Asia.

“Di naman dapat tayo magpapa-api (We should not get trampled on), said Vargas.

“Anong tumutulak sa atin? We want to be able to send the best team we can give, for the Filipinos and for basketball, to fight for the gold medal. Yan and tumutulak sa atin,” he added.

“We cannot just not try and allow these things to happen without fighting for our rights,” the SBP official said.

Blatche, who played for the Brooklyn Nets in the NBA, became a naturalized Filipino last June, and was able to play for Gilas in the still ongoing FIBA World Cup in Spain.

But Incheon organizers said OCA’s rules are different from FIBA’s. For the Asian Games, naturalized players need a three-year residency before they are allowed to see action.

Patrick Baumann, FIBA secretary-general, wrote Incheon the other day questioning its decision to declare Blatch ineligible to play in the Asian Games when the NBA star just saw action for Gilas in Spain.

However, the FIBA message fell on deaf ears.

Now, Gilas will give it one last try to convince OCA and the organizers to let Blatche in.

Moying Martelino, former secretary-general of the Asian Basketball Confederation and now SBP consultant, will leave for Incheon tomorrow.

Joining Martelino in the negotiating team is Richie Garcia, Philippine Sports Commission chairman and chef-de-mission of the Pinoy delegation to this year’s Asiad.

Philippine Olympic Committee president Jose Cojuangco said he’s with SBP in this battle but reserved further comment.

FROM THE MANILA STANDARD

Gilas 5 still a force sans Blatche By Dennis Principe | Sep. 11, 2014 at 12:01am


Cone

WITH or without naturalized center Andray Blatche, the Philippines will still be a force to reckon with in the basketball competitions of the upcoming Asian Games.

No less than grand slam coach Tim Cone gave this assessment when asked about the country’s chances in basketball, which will most likely play without its prized recruit.

While he believes that Blatche was a major factor in making Gilas Pilipinas play competitive basketball during the FIBA World Cup, the team’s performance was not really anchored on the American’s presence.

“Andray is a great player and he changes the way we play, but I’m not sure that we really need him that badly. I think we could do really well in the Asian Games without him. Especially if Marcus Douthit plays,” said Cone.

The Nationals ended their FIBA World Cup campaign with a solitary win in five games, with three of the four losses deemed winnable if not for some endgame errors.

Making its first World championship appearance after a 36-year hiatus, the Nationals were supposed to be manhandled by the opposition, owing to its long absence from the sport’s most prestigious tournament.

Recently, the Incheon Asian Games Organizing Committee, citing a specific rule set by the Olympic Council of Asia regarding naturalized players, has disqualified Blatche from the country’s basketball roster because of residency issue.

Under the OCA rules, a naturalized player is required to reside for a minimum of 36 months in their adopted country.

Blatche, who averaged 21.2 points and a team-best 13.8 rebounds during his Gilas stint, got his Philippine citizenship last June.

“He gave great confidence to the team, but there were times when he was on the court, we played much better without him. Still, that’s only for short stretches and you’re talking about a 40-minute game,” said Cone.

* The Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas, led by its president Manny V. Pangilinan is making one final push to convince the IAGOC to reconsider its earlier decision to disqualify Blatche from the Asiad.

The SBP, apart from sending key sports officials to Korea to bat for Blatche, also sent a letter of appeal to OCA President Sheikh Ahmad Al-Fahad Al Sabah.

“It is our sincere hope that this ‘misunderstanding’ would not lead the SBP to consider any alternative other than to participate, considering that the Games are due to start in less than two weeks,” Pangilinan stated in the letter.

The SBP is banking on FIBA’s rule that allowed Blatche to be part of the Gilas Pilipinas line-up that played in this year’s FIBA World Cup.

However, a senior sports official who requested anonymity at the moment highly doubts the chances of the SBP about their request.

“That rule applies to all sports sanctioned by OCA. If you change the interpretation now, you will just open the door for all sports. It will open floodgates. It’s a general rule” said the official. “May general rule at may local rule. The Asian Games is not a FIBA event. It was OCA that granted the hosting to Korea.”

Mayweather to retire in 2015, denies negotiating with Pacquiao By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated September 10, 2014 - 3:04pm 25 197 googleplus0 0


Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao

MANILA, Philippines – Floyd Mayweather says he will fight for one more year before hanging up his gloves.

Mayweather, still undefeated after 46 outings, confirmed he will quit boxing in 2015 after two more fights, which are part of his lucrative six-bout deal with broadcaster Showtime.

"I only got two more fights left (after Saturday) and after the next two fights I just want to build the Mayweather Promotions brand,” the American boxer said in a report by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Mayweather will take on Marcos Maidana in rematch Sunday, his fourth fight under Showtime, then plans to see action again in May and September next year before finally calling it quits.

It’s a schedule he vowed to stick to.

"My next fight is in May and my last fight is in September, so a year from now will be my last fight,” Mayweather said, refusing to state his preferred opponents.

"As of right now, my focus is on Maidana. I can't focus on the other two fights after that. I have to focus on Maidana. After that we can't say who's the next two are going to be but I'm pretty sure the next two will be exciting fights," the boxer added.

* Maidana, a hard-punching slugger from Argentina, pushed Mayweather to the limit in their first meeting in May this year. He threw everything but the kitchen sink on the undefeated American in the early rounds but still came up short as Mayweather outboxed him for the rest of the fight to win a majority decision.

If Mayweather gets past Maidana again on Sunday, talks about a long-overdue megabuck bout with Pacquiao are expected to come up anew.

Pacquiao himself said there have been preliminary talks with the Mayweather camp about a fight, and Top Rank Inc. chief Bob Arum is confident the bout will finally happen in 2015.

But Mayweather denied those statements by Pacquiao and Arum.

"Not true," Mayweather said. "I can't say what the future holds, but Arum and Pacquiao is trying to sell tickets for the (fight with the) guy named (Chris) Algieri. Trying to sell tickets for that fight. I don't know where they fighting, I don't know anything about what Top Rank is doing."

Pacquiao will take on Chris Algieri on Nov. 23 in Macau, after which he’ll fight four more times – twice each in 2015 and 2016 – before also retiring from the sport.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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