"WE NEED NO WIN, ONLY A KNOCKOUT" PACMAN'S ADVISER KONCZ

THE mood in Team Pacquiao is upbeat and the consensus is best reflected by the Filipino ring icon’s adviser Michael Koncz, who told the Manila Standard: “We don’t need a win. We need a knockout!” Koncz, who has been with Pacquiao for the past nine years, has consistently maintained that a win, no matter how lopsided, won’t help reinstate Pacquiao among the roster of elite fighters in the world. He told the Manila Standard in an overseas telephone conversation from Las Vegas that Pacquiao needs to erase all doubts about his status as one of the greatest fighters of all time and the best way to achieve that is by scoring “a spectacular knockout” over World Boxing Organization welterweight champion Timothy Bradley in their rematch at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Sunday (Manila time). The Top Rank fight card will be telecast by Solar Sports and GMA 7 beginning at 10 a.m. tomorrow (Sunday). Koncz expressed confidence that Pacquiao would be able to also deliver on trainer Freddie Roach’s wish for a knockout to erase the painful memory of their first fight when Bradley won a universally condemned split decision because of the inexplicable scorecards of judges Cynthia Ross and Duane Ford, who had the American winning, 115-113, while Jerry Roth had Pacquiao the winner by a similar margin.

Pacquiao wins unanimous decision vs Bradley to reclaim WBO title

Revenge was served, and it was cold. Manny Pacquiao won a 12-round unanimous decision over Timothy Bradley on Saturday to avenge his controversial 2012 loss to the previously unbeaten American. The Filipino ring icon improved to 56-5 with two drawn and 38 wins inside the distance as he regained the World Boxing Organization welterweight world title he lost to Bradley on June 9, 2012. Although he couldn’t get his first knockout win since 2009, Pacquiao lived up to his pre-fight promise to come out with more aggression, denying Bradley’s avowed aim of sending him into retirement with another defeat. “I think I can go another two years,” said Pacquiao, who has won world titles in an unprecedented eight weight divisions. “I’m so happy to be world champion again. Tim Bradley was not an easy fight.” Bradley, who said he fought from the first round with a right calf injury, fell to 31-1, with 12 knockouts. “Life goes on,” Bradley said of his first pro defeat. “It’s back to the gym. Not a big deal.”“You won the fight, you deserved the win,” Bradley said. “I have no excuses.” READ MORE...

ALSO: Mommy D steals show in Pacquiao-Bradley match with ringside antics

Did “Mommy D” just put a hex on Timothy Bradley? A short video has gone viral, showing Dionisia, the mother of boxing champion and Saranggani Rep. Manny Pacquiao, at ringside, uttering something and making hand gestures while her son was in trading punches with Bradley in Las Vegas on Thursday. Her left hand was clutching a rosary and what appeared to be an estampita, her right middle finger pointing to the cameras. The joke on social media was that she’s “casting a spell” on her son’s brash opponent. Whatever it was, it seemed to work. And with those precious few seconds during the pay-per-view telecast, Dionisia Pacquiao stole the show from Manny, who would go on to avenge his highly disputed split decision lost to Bradley in 2012. Here was an animated 64-year-old woman, wearing a terno, jumping off her ringside seat during furious exchanges between Pacquiao and Bradley. One photo circulating on Twitter showed her furiously pointing two fingers at Bradley, who had gone off balance. Seeing Dionisia on the screen, a commentator for the international broadcast thought she was uttering some “curse” in Filipino. At the end of the fight, she was shown embracing a defeated Bradley while offering some words of consolation. Her antics provided a comic relief to Filipino viewers mostly curious if Pacquiao would get a clear decision against Bradley this time. Still fresh in his supporters’ minds was his brutal one-punch knockout loss to his archrival, Mexican great Juan Manuel Marquez, more than a year ago. READ MORE...

ALSO: Pacquiao punching power ‘way harder’ in first fight—Bradley

Timothy Bradley admitted Manny Pacquiao was able to hurt him throughout their WBO welterweight title rematch that lasted another 12 rounds Saturday (Sunday in Manila). Bradley’s face swelled from the punches he took from Pacquiao but Bradley was convinced that the former pound-for-pound king’s power was no longer the same from the time they met in the ring the first time nearly two years ago. “I believe in the first fight his punching power was way harder but I was able to take it,” Bradley, who suffered his first loss after winning 31 straight, said during the post-fight presser. “I mean it was very effective tonight, he was able to daze me a couple of times during the fight but I still was able to stay up on my feet but I had no control of my balance this time around.” Pacquiao said he looked for the knockout but just couldn’t pull it off as Bradley managed to hang on. “There was a time I was looking for the knockout but he was moving around,” Pacquiao said after a decisive 116-112, 116-112, 118-110 unanimous decision win. “Oh yeah he went for the knockout. He definitely did,” said the 30-year-old Bradley.READ MORE...

ALSO: Bradley: No excuses despite calf injury

A calf injury in the opening round hampered Timothy Bradley the rest of the way, but he refused to make excuses for losing his World Boxing Organization welterweight world title to Manny Pacquiao. Bradley was seen limping towards his corner in several instances during the fight at the packed MGM Grand Garden Arena, and even in the post-fight presser. In their first encounter in June 2012, Bradley appeared before the media in a wheelchair because of his injured feet. “I don’t want to make any excuses and take anything from Pacquiao tonight. I don’t want to mention anything that happened to me. I don’t want to talk about it,” a reluctant Bradley said in the post-fight presser. In a story by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael, Bradley’s trainer Joel Diaz said he “didn’t have much to work with” because of the pain. “After the first round Tim came back to the corner and said, ‘I think I tore my right calf.’ I began to massage it. He was in a lot of pain from that point on.”
 


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‘We need no win, only a knockout’

MANILA, APRIL 14, 2014, (MANILA STANDARD) By Ronnie Nathanielsz - THE mood in Team Pacquiao is upbeat and the consensus is best reflected by the Filipino ring icon’s adviser Michael Koncz, who told the Manila Standard: “We don’t need a win. We need a knockout!”

Koncz, who has been with Pacquiao for the past nine years, has consistently maintained that a win, no matter how lopsided, won’t help reinstate Pacquiao among the roster of elite fighters in the world.


Pacquiao and Bradley

He told the Manila Standard in an overseas telephone conversation from Las Vegas that Pacquiao needs to erase all doubts about his status as one of the greatest fighters of all time and the best way to achieve that is by scoring “a spectacular knockout” over World Boxing Organization welterweight champion Timothy Bradley in their rematch at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Sunday (Manila time).

The Top Rank fight card will be telecast by Solar Sports and GMA 7 beginning at 10 a.m. tomorrow (Sunday).

Koncz expressed confidence that Pacquiao would be able to also deliver on trainer Freddie Roach’s wish for a knockout to erase the painful memory of their first fight when Bradley won a universally condemned split decision because of the inexplicable scorecards of judges Cynthia Ross and Duane Ford, who had the American winning, 115-113, while Jerry Roth had Pacquiao the winner by a similar margin.

Bradley and his trainer Joel Diaz have tried to get under Pacquiao’s skin, with the champ insisting he won the first fight by eight rounds to four, and that Pacquiao had lost his killer instinct and his power.

On the other hand, Diaz claimed the rematch would see the end of Pacquiao’s career.

Koncz believes Bradley’s comments “put a fire under Manny” and while Pacquiao “proved to the world that he’s back” after a superb display against former lightweight champion Brandon Rios last Nov. 24 in Macau, he “didn’t see the desire to knock somebody out.”

Given the prevalent mood around the rematch, Koncz believes Pacquiao “needs to put an exclamation mark.”

“He must show the world that if Manny puts his mind to it, he has all the tools he had five years ago and while he’s getting older, he’s getting smarter, fighting a much more intelligent fight and not wasting energy,” said Koncz, who insisted “against Bradley, a knockout is in order.”

Koncz said he is not worried about Pacquiao’s power.

“It is still there. But he needs to be aggressive,” said Koncz, who also revealed that he expects Bradley to run and try to outbox Pacquiao, but that after the first four or five rounds, the Filipino will hunt him down and catch him and “knock him out with a body shot, not a head shot because Bradley can take a punch to the chin.”

He said Pacquiao, who has trained harder than ever under Roach and returning strength and conditioning coach Justin Fortune, “is mentally fine.”

Koncz, who was the first to draw promoter Arum’s attention to the fact that the MGM Grand had plastered promotional material for the Floyd Mayweather Jr.- Marcos Maidana fight on May 5 all over the arena, told Manila Standard, “it was a slap in the face” and as a result the MGM Grand had “lost us forever.”

FROM THE INQUIRER

Pacquiao wins unanimous decision vs Bradley to reclaim WBO title By Bong Lozada, Mark Giongco Agence France-Presse, Associated Press, INQUIRER.net 1:13 pm | Sunday, April 13th, 2014


Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines acknowledges the crowd just after his unanimous decision victory over Timothy Bradley during their WBO World Welterweight championship boxing match, Saturday, April 12, 2014, at The MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. AP

LAS VEGAS/MANILA — Revenge was served, and it was cold.

Manny Pacquiao won a 12-round unanimous decision over Timothy Bradley on Saturday to avenge his controversial 2012 loss to the previously unbeaten American.

The Filipino ring icon improved to 56-5 with two drawn and 38 wins inside the distance as he regained the World Boxing Organization welterweight world title he lost to Bradley on June 9, 2012.

Although he couldn’t get his first knockout win since 2009, Pacquiao lived up to his pre-fight promise to come out with more aggression, denying Bradley’s avowed aim of sending him into retirement with another defeat.

“I think I can go another two years,” said Pacquiao, who has won world titles in an unprecedented eight weight divisions. “I’m so happy to be world champion again. Tim Bradley was not an easy fight.”

Bradley, who said he fought from the first round with a right calf injury, fell to 31-1, with 12 knockouts.

“Life goes on,” Bradley said of his first pro defeat. “It’s back to the gym. Not a big deal.”

“You won the fight, you deserved the win,” Bradley said. “I have no excuses.”

After a forgetful 2012, Pacquiao has now picked up two impressive wins in just five months following a dominant victory over Mexican-American Brandon Rios last November at the Venetian in Macau.

Scorecard

Judge Glen Trowbridge scored the bout 118-110 for Pacquiao, while both Michael Pernick and Canada’s Craig Metcalf saw it 116-112 for the ‘Pacman,’ whose every move was cheered by the star-studded crowd of 15,601 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

“Bradley is better from the first fight,” Pacquiao said. “He hurt me on the chin. He made adjustments.

“I knew I had to do more this time than I did the last time,” he added.

Pacquiao landed 35 percent of his 563 punches, while Bradley connected with just 22 percent of his 627 blows. Pacquiao’s jab was much more effective, landing 23 percent to Bradley’s measly 11 percent, and the Pacman had a slight edge in landing 148 power punches to Bradley’s 109.

Round by round

Pacquiao’s performance righted one of the biggest perceived wrongs in recent boxing history. Pacquiao was an eight-division world champion on 15-fight winning streak when Bradley was awarded a split decision in their last bout.

Pacquiao was more aggressive and accurate from the opening minutes of the rematch, sticking to trainer Freddie Roach’s pleas to take the action to Bradley. They exchanged big shots in the opening rounds, but Pacquiao appeared to wear out Bradley with the heavy early pace — and the Pacman never slowed down.

Pacquiao landed a series of big left hands in the early rounds, knocking back Bradley with gusto.

Bradley responded impressively in the fourth round, wobbling Pacquiao twice with a right hand.

The pace slowed in the fifth, with Bradley showing off his defense and movement while Pacquiao attempted to trap him against the ropes.

Pacquiao appeared to wobble Bradley late in the seventh round with a vicious combination, but Bradley stood with his back against the ropes and defiantly encouraged it, blocking most of the shots. Bradley appeared to pretend to have wobbly legs at one point after a Pacquiao miss, but his open mouth betrayed his weariness while Pacquiao steadily racked up rounds midway through the fight.

Bradley came on strong in the 12th, and the fighters’ heads collided late in the round. Pacquiao avoided any trouble until the final bell, when he did a short dance step to his corner.

Pacquiao finished the fight with a cut over his left eye. Roach said Pacquiao needed stitches to close the jagged cut.

Old ‘killer instinct’

Saturday’s victory showcased more of the old “killer instinct,” with Bradley saying it was clear that Pacquiao was “going for it”.

But Roach said Bradley’s unexpected strategy of seeking a big knockout blow of his own caught him and Pacquiao by surprise.

“He was swinging for the fences all night,” Roach said of Bradley, who said he thought it was the only way he could win the fight.

But as the pace slowed in the later rounds, Pacquiao dominated, putting together multi-punch combinations that kept Bradley off balance.

“I tried, I really tried,” said Bradley. “I wanted that knockout. I kept trying to throw something over the top, that’s what the plan was.”

But Bradley trainer Joel Diaz said he knew the plan had gone out the window when Bradley came to the corner after the first round saying he thought he had torn his right calf muscle.

Diaz tried massaging it, but Bradley told him to stop because it hurt.

“From that point on, I knew I didn’t have much to work with, because our plan was to dominate Pacquiao and we couldn’t do it,” Diaz said.

The injury was later diagnosed as a strain, and Bradley said he had “no excuses”.

“Manny is a great fighter, one of the best in the world maybe the best ever,” he said.

Before the rematch

While Bradley remains publicly confident he beat Pacquiao in their first bout despite fighting on two injured feet, that much-derided decision sent both fighters’ careers on wild spirals.

The two judges who scored the bout 115-113 for Bradley are no longer in the boxing business, but their decision ended Pacquiao’s 15-fight win streak and forced Bradley to defend himself against widespread criticism of the result.

Bradley endured death threats and depression before returning to the ring in unusually reckless style. He brawled with Ruslan Provodnikov in March 2013 in a sensational unanimous-decision victory that silenced critics of his style and heart.

Bradley then outpointed veteran Mexican champion Juan Manuel Marquez last fall, polishing his skills and making himself attractive to Pacquiao for a rematch.

Pacquiao was knocked unconscious by Marquez in the sixth round of their fourth fight in late 2012, and he took nearly a year off before returning for an unspectacular victory over Brandon Rios last fall. Pacquiao’s last two performances prompted Bradley to declare Pacquiao had lost his killer instinct, noting he was unable or unwilling to stop any of his opponents since late 2009.

Pacquiao’s next foe

Pacquiao’s next opponent could be the winner of the May 17 bout between Mike Alvarado and Marquez.
If Marquez wins, he could meet Pacquiao for the fifth time.

“I have no problem with fighting Marquez again, but that’s up to my promoter, Bob Arum,” Pacquiao said.

Motherly love

After the decision was announced, Dionisia Pacquiao, the fighting congressman’s mother, quickly approached the fallen American.

Mommy D, as she is fondly called, was probably the first to console Bradley from the Pacquiao camp, giving the American some motherly hug and a playful jab to the chin.

And Mommy D did not disappoint, claiming the 8th spot on the World’s trending topics on Twitter as of 1:30 p.m. (Manila time).

Mommy D steals show in Pacquiao-Bradley match with ringside antics By Christian V. Esguerra Philippine Daily Inquirer 7:55 pm | Sunday, April 13th, 2014


Dionisia Pacquiao (L), mother of Manny Pacquiao, holds aloft her son’s gloves beside trainer Bouboy Fernandez (R) following Pacquiao’s WBO welterweight title fight victory over Timothy Bradley on April 12. AFP

MANILA, Philippines — Did “Mommy D” just put a hex on Timothy Bradley?

A short video has gone viral, showing Dionisia, the mother of boxing champion and Saranggani Rep. Manny Pacquiao, at ringside, uttering something and making hand gestures while her son was in trading punches with Bradley in Las Vegas on Thursday.

Her left hand was clutching a rosary and what appeared to be an estampita, her right middle finger pointing to the cameras. The joke on social media was that she’s “casting a spell” on her son’s brash opponent.

Whatever it was, it seemed to work. And with those precious few seconds during the pay-per-view telecast, Dionisia Pacquiao stole the show from Manny, who would go on to avenge his highly disputed split decision lost to Bradley in 2012.

Here was an animated 64-year-old woman, wearing a terno, jumping off her ringside seat during furious exchanges between Pacquiao and Bradley. One photo circulating on Twitter showed her furiously pointing two fingers at Bradley, who had gone off balance.

Seeing Dionisia on the screen, a commentator for the international broadcast thought she was uttering some “curse” in Filipino. At the end of the fight, she was shown embracing a defeated Bradley while offering some words of consolation.

Her antics provided a comic relief to Filipino viewers mostly curious if Pacquiao would get a clear decision against Bradley this time.

Still fresh in his supporters’ minds was his brutal one-punch knockout loss to his archrival, Mexican great Juan Manuel Marquez, more than a year ago.

But in his return bout against Bradley, Pacquiao, winner of multiple titles in record eight different weight divisions, coasted to his second straight victory since that defeat.

For that, a Malacañang spokesperson said the country would again roll out the red carpet for the boxing superstar.

“We will extend the proverbial red carpet when we welcome home Congressman Manny Pacquiao who will certainly experience the warmth of the unparalleled enthusiasm and abiding affection of nearly 100 million Filipinos,”

Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma said in a statement.

“We join the Filipino nation in celebrating the magnificent triumph of our national treasure in global sports, Congressman Manny Pacquiao.”

Coloma said Pacquiao “embodies the world-class qualities of the Filipino in many competitive fields.” “We can hold our heads up high by dint of our industry, hard work and courage,” he said.

Deputy Presidential Spokesperson Abigail Valte described Pacquiao as “truly, an inspiration for so many of our countrymen.”
After our country was hit by disaster after disaster last year, “Manny serves as a symbol of our recovery,” she said.

“Our message to the world is clear: While vicious storms may knock us down, we will always stand back up. The deep faith, solidarity, and strength of will of the Filipino people will always prove stronger.”

Coloma added: “In the face of successive calamities and challenges, the Filipino people have demonstrated their remarkable resiliency and steadfast determination to rebuild their communities, guided by their faith in Divine Providence and in their God-given talents and capabilities.”

Sen. Juan Edgardo Angara said Pacquiao’s victory “undoubtedly” brought the country “back in the world boxing map.”
“Congressman Manny did not just reclaim his crown, but [also] the respect and admiration of the world,” he said.

Sen. Nancy Binay said Filipinos “take pride in [Pacquiao’s] tenacity, dedication and love for country.”

“You always made us proud that we are Filipino. You embody the hope that everyone of us has a fighting chance, as long as we work hard for it, as long as we believe,” she said.

Pacquiao punching power ‘way harder’ in first fight—Bradley By Mark Giongco INQUIRER.net 6:14 pm | Sunday, April 13th, 2014


Timothy Bradley, left, lands a left to the head of Manny Pacquiao, of the Philippines, in their WBO welterweight title boxing fight Saturday, April 12, 2014, in Las Vegas. AP

MANILA, Philippines — Timothy Bradley admitted Manny Pacquiao was able to hurt him throughout their WBO welterweight title rematch that lasted another 12 rounds Saturday (Sunday in Manila).

Bradley’s face swelled from the punches he took from Pacquiao but Bradley was convinced that the former pound-for-pound king’s power was no longer the same from the time they met in the ring the first time nearly two years ago.

“I believe in the first fight his punching power was way harder but I was able to take it,” Bradley, who suffered his first loss after winning 31 straight, said during the post-fight presser.

“I mean it was very effective tonight, he was able to daze me a couple of times during the fight but I still was able to stay up on my feet but I had no control of my balance this time around.”

Pacquiao said he looked for the knockout but just couldn’t pull it off as Bradley managed to hang on.

“There was a time I was looking for the knockout but he was moving around,” Pacquiao said after a decisive 116-112, 116-112, 118-110 unanimous decision win.

“Oh yeah he went for the knockout. He definitely did,” said the 30-year-old Bradley.

Bradley too tried to finish off the fight when the chance presented itself after he staggered Pacquiao in the fourth round.
“That was the only way I was going to win the fight,” Bradley said.

“My opponent is trying to knock me out. There were a couple of times where he hit me with good right and left hooks but it’s okay, I managed through those punches,” also said Pacquiao, who got 32 stitches after getting a nasty gash over his left eye after an accidental head butt in the waning seconds of the last round.

Pacquiao’s power didn’t seem to be the difference maker but rather his experience was.

“Pacquiao is very experienced, he knows how to land punches and If I don’t knock this guy out I didn’t think I was going to win a close round. So I was just shooting and going for the knockout like I told everybody I was going to go for it. He said I hurt him in the fourth round with a big shot over the top, I tried to finish up but like I said he is really experienced in the ring,” Bradley added.

Whether the 35-year-old Pacquiao’s power has taken a dip with his best years may have been behind him and that he still hasn’t stopped an opponent since scoring a TKO victory over Miguel Cotto five years ago, he was still able to make a point.

“I proved tonight that my journey in boxing will continue. My opponent is not easy, he is very tough. A couple more years I can still fight,” said the Fighter of the Decade Pacquiao.

“Pacquiao was the better man tonight. He was able to show what he’s made of. The dude still has it,” said Bradley.

Bradley: No excuses despite calf injury By Celest R. Flores INQUIRER.net 4:36 pm | Sunday, April 13th, 2014


Timothy Bradley, left, trades blows with Manny Pacquiao, of the Philippines, in their WBO welterweight title boxing bout Saturday, April 12, 2014, in Las Vegas. AP

MANILA, Philippines— A calf injury in the opening round hampered Timothy Bradley the rest of the way, but he refused to make excuses for losing his World Boxing Organization welterweight world title to Manny Pacquiao.

Bradley was seen limping towards his corner in several instances during the fight at the packed MGM Grand Garden Arena, and even in the post-fight presser. In their first encounter in June 2012, Bradley appeared before the media in a wheelchair because of his injured feet.

“I don’t want to make any excuses and take anything from Pacquiao tonight. I don’t want to mention anything that happened to me. I don’t want to talk about it,” a reluctant Bradley said in the post-fight presser.

In a story by ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael, Bradley’s trainer Joel Diaz said he “didn’t have much to work with” because of the pain.

“After the first round Tim came back to the corner and said, ‘I think I tore my right calf.’ I began to massage it. He was in a lot of pain from that point on.”

While Bradley managed to rock Pacquiao with a few solid hits, those weren’t enough to defeat Filipino boxer again. Pacquiao won via unanimous decision.

“I don’t want to take anything from Pacquiao. He fought a courageous fight and he did his best. I have to accept defeat like a man,” Bradley said.

“It happens. But I continued on to fight my fight and I did the best I can tonight and I fought a greatest fight and I hope all the fans enjoyed it. It was very entertaining for me.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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