PACQUIAO: A SUPERTYPHOON OR MERE STORM?

He had long charted the course of this super storm from General Santos, roaring to the pinnacle of his career only to be stopped on his path by a Mexican tornado with a thunderbolt of a right last December. Now there are questions whether there are some tailwind left in him and whether Rios’ dreaded punch has the kind of velocity that would hasten Pacquiao’s ultimate exit. “Is Rios good enough to execute a win, is he good enough to take advantage of the decline in Manny’s form?” said Merchant. NOV. 23, SATURDAY.

ALSO: Rios breaks down after painful loss
The Mexican-American banger tried to explain what transpired in the ring that time. “Every time I threw (punches), I felt like I was gonna get countered,” Rios, who was then sporting a pair of shades to cover the cut and bruises he sustained, told Poncher. Then he started breaking down.

ALSO: Let’s celebrate, discuss next bout later – Arum

 


VIDEO: Rios couldn’t hold back his tears during an
interview with journalist Crystina Ponche
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PACQUIAO: A SUPERTYPHOON OR MERE STORM?


Manny Pacquiao (left) and Brandon Rios show their form during weigh in. ABAC CORDERO

MANILA, NOVEMBER 25, 2013 (PHILSTAR) By Lito A. Tacujan - “He was like a typhoon that crossed the Pacific,” said Larry Merchant, the grand old man of HBO Boxing, when asked his impression upon seeing Manny Pacquiao for the first time.

That was in 2001 in Las Vegas when the Filipino icon burst into the consciousness of Vegas fight people, as he manhandled and dethroned South African Lehlo Ledwaba.

That storm has since gathered speed and strength and developed into a super typhoon that devastated the ranks of the best and other ring heroes the last 12 years.

It has since weakened the past two years, so fight pundits were quick to say, and he’s now trying to whip up another storm with his Sunday brawl with Brandon Rios and the irony of it, needing a decisive win to provide some relief to a nation ravaged by a super typhoon three weeks ago.

“I love him the first time I saw him, but on hindsight I could not have used that metaphor, “ said the 82-year-old Merchant.

He had long charted the course of this super storm from General Santos, roaring to the pinnacle of his career only to be stopped on his path by a Mexican tornado with a thunderbolt of a right last December.

Now there are questions whether there are some tailwind left in him and whether Rios’ dreaded punch has the kind of velocity that would hasten Pacquiao’s ultimate exit.

“Is Rios good enough to execute a win, is he good enough to take advantage of the decline in Manny’s form?” said Merchant.

His shock defeat at the hands of Juan Manuel Marquez showed Pacquiao was vulnerable and could be hit and hurt but Merchant said Rios is slow on his feet and “will fight it smart, and will put in relentless pressure but not reckless pressure.”

Larry Merchant Merchant felt pitting Rios in that Sunday showdown at the Cotai Arena is the right fight for Pacquiao in his bid to come out of the trauma of that horrendous knockout by Marquez that saw the Filipino champ hitting the canvass face first.

But would he ever flash the old Pacquiao again?

“It’s harder for older fighters to really recover from a knockout. The young opponents would somehow find weakness, expose cracks and work on them, they know you are on the decline,” he said.

Still Merchant remains a Pacquiao man on the good and bad years. “He’s the best of his time.”

Rios breaks down after painful loss By Dino Maragay (philstar.com) | Updated November 26, 2013 - 3:46am 5 1 googleplus0 0


Manny Pacquiao lands a left to the head of Brandon Rios of the United States during their WBO international welterweight title fight Sunday, Nov. 24, in Macau. Pacquiao won by unanimous decision. (AP Photo/ Vincent Yu)

MACAU – The pain of losing the biggest fight of his career – in a lopsided manner – turned out to be too much to bear for Brandon Rios.

In a video that appeared on YouTube, Rios couldn’t hold back his tears during an interview with journalist Crystina Poncher at the post-fight presser of his bout with Manny Pacquiao at the Venetian Resort here.

At first, Rios made sure to stress that Pacquiao didn’t hurt him throughout the fight, which ended up in a one-sided decision victory for the Filipino.

The Mexican-American banger tried to explain what transpired in the ring that time.

“Every time I threw (punches), I felt like I was gonna get countered,” Rios, who was then sporting a pair of shades to cover the cut and bruises he sustained, told Poncher.

Then he started breaking down.

“I trained my a** off to win,” he said, eventually turning away from the camera in an effort to compose himself. He then returned to finish the rest of the interview.

“It hurts me bad because I... I've liked, worked my a** off so hard. Five months in the gym, training, training, training. And I think it was the best camp ever. It happens. Then it goes the other way,” explained Rios, who was still trying to hold back his tears.

Through most of the fight, Rios was at the receiving end of flurries from Pacquiao, who in a fine display of footwork and head movement didn’t leave room for his foe to significantly respond. The Oxnard, California-based slugger ended up suffering the worst beating of his career.

At one moment during the interview, Poncher tried to console Rios, pointing out that he lost to a world-class fighter like Pacquiao – something one couldn’t be ashamed of.

But Rios just couldn’t hide his grief.

“He's very fast, he's very awkward. It hurts really bad. It felt like, I let my team down... because I tried and we worked so hard and we were so confident and everything. That's where it hurts,” he continued.

Being the proud warrior he is, however, Rios vowed to return as much a better fighter.

“I'll bounce back. You learn from your mistake. I'll bounce back,” he ended.

Let’s celebrate, discuss next bout later – Arum By Abac Cordero (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 26, 2013 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


Manny Pacquiao waits for the flight back home. ABAC CORDERO

HONG KONG – Bob Arum grinned as he stepped out of Manny Pacquiao’s luxurious suite at the Venetian Hotel yesterday morning.

He had all the reasons to be happy.

“This is the time for celebration,” said the 80ish boxing promoter a day after Pacquiao pummeled Brandon Rios for 12 rounds at the Cotai Arena in Macau.

The last time Pacquiao was inside the ring, last December, he lay face down and motionless after taking a big right from Juan Manuel Marquez.

In June last year, Pacquiao also lost on points to Timothy Bradley. Many people thought he won the fight but officially, in the records, he lost.

That’s why Sunday morning’s victory over Rios is enough reason to celebrate.

Arum said Pacquiao should be back in action in April next year, most likely in Las Vegas. But he did not want to talk about it yesterday.

They’re looking at a few names, including Marquez, Bradley, Russian beast Ruslan Provodnikov and Floyd Mayweather Jr. Add Miguel Cotto to the list.

“This is the time for celebration not talking about business,” said Arum, who visited Pacquiao with his wife, Lovey.

But is Pacquiao willing to fight again in April?

“Yeah I think so. We’re going to be talking but again there’s nothing concrete. Absolutely a great performance last night and he’s back where he should be,” said Arum.

“So we should all be proud and pray and everybody have a good Christmas and New Year,” he added.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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