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CONNECTING TO PUBLIC WIFI POSES GRAVE RISK TO YOUR SECURITY - REPORT


AUGUST 1 -Connecting to public Wi-Fi is not so harmless after all. According to a report from Malaysia-based publication The Star Online, connecting to public networks poses a grave risk to your security. LE Global Services (LGMS) Executive Director Fong Choong Fook said that he would never use a public Wi-Fi because of its privacy risks. Fong’s private cybersecurity firm tests the network security of Malaysia’s major banks using employed hackers.
“Even an IT person may not be able to tell if the access point he is connected to is safe or if the activities are being watched. There may be signs like your Internet is slowing down but hackers can make it so elegant that you won’t even notice,” Fong explained. Hackers can get between a device and the Wi-Fi router, thus being able to record private data like passwords and credit card information entered into the device, according to Malaysia’s national cyber security agency CyberSecurity Malaysia (CSM). They can also disguise their hacking hardware as Wi-Fi and name it after a restaurant or office, tricking people into connecting to a public access point which they think is secure. Fong said that this kind of cyberattack has been going on way back in the 1990s. LGMS demonstrated the procedure, setting up a Wi-Fi using a laptop and named it after a famous restaurant just below its office in Puchong, Selangor. Fong then connected two devices to the Wi-Fi network and logged on to social media and government websites. The hacker’s computer then recorded all activities from the two devices, every e-mail address, username and password keyed in the device. Three other devices outside of the experiment connected to the dummy Wi-Fi named after the restaurant. “Hackers can target one specific person or they can target everyone in a cafe to get their devices to send all their data through their dummy Wi-Fi. When they have your information, they can steal your identity. They can pose as you on Facebook, or send out e-mails to your contacts under your account,” he said. READ MORE...

ALSO: How To Stay Safe On Public Wi-Fi


JUNE 2016 -
If you take a trip today, you’re bound to come across more free public wi-fi spots than ever before. They can be great for getting work done, managing your social media empire, and generally staying connected — but these public networks can also be a major security risk. Here’s what you need to know about using free public wi-fi and how you can keep yourself safe. Read the terms and conditions carefully In your eagerness to get an internet connection, it can be tempting to click through whatever welcome screens appear, but you should be very careful to check what you’re signing up for. A big chunk of wi-fi networks are set up in public places by marketing firms who are willing to give you some bandwidth in return for an email address and phone number, for example. The connection terms and conditions should include details of how your data is going to be used. If you can bear delaying your next Facebook check-in for a few minutes, it pays to read through these in full before deciding whether web access really is worth the information you’re giving up. This is one of those times when it’s handy to have an alternative email address you can make use of. What’s more, you should stick to advertised, official wi-fi networks that have been set up by the coffee shop, airport, bar or whatever venue you’re in. It’s known that hackers can set up free wi-fi networks to catch gullible citizens looking for free bandwidth. If you see an open, innocuous network that seems too good to be true, then it probably is. Stick to secure websites and apps That green padlock that appears in your browser’s address bar when you’re on a secure connection is even more important when you’re on public wi-fi. Think long and hard — and then think again — before doing anything important across an unsecured connection, because it’s going to be much easier for someone else on the same network to grab the data that’s transferred. If you’re connected on your phone, it’s better to use a mobile browser than an app, because browsers are more fussy when it comes to checking and verifying these HTTPS connections. Essentially, apps can be accepting bogus security credentials without your knowledge, and that’s a problem if you’re doing something important like online banking or buying stuff online. In terms of mobile apps, you’re really at the mercy of the developer as far as wireless security goes. Sticking to apps from big, well-known names while on public wi-fi will limit the risk (though it’s no guarantee). If you’re using the mobile versions of Chrome or Safari, on the other hand, then you’ve got the same kind of protection in place as you do when using the desktop programs. Install a VPN app READ MORE...

ALSO: Google calls on Filipino youth to join ‘Web Rangers’ program


AUGUST 1 -SCREENGRAB from webrangers.ph
Internet giant Google on Monday opened its doors to a new batch of aspiring “Web Rangers” from the Philippines to support its digital literacy campaign. Filipinos 15 to 20 years old are invited to take part by signing up at the Web Rangers website (http://webrangers.ph) beginning August 1. Now on its second year, the competition aims to explore what netizens can do to use the internet for meaningful activities that will help them pursue their passion, develop new talents and skills and discover things that can help them level up. Sixty young Filipinos will be selected based on their answers to the questions they’ll get in the sign-up sheet. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Connecting to public Wi-Fi poses grave risk to security—report


Connecting to public Wi-Fi is not so harmless after all.

MALAYSIA, AUGUST 8, 2016 (INQUIRER) INQUIRER.net August 1st, 2016 03:00 PM - According to a report from Malaysia-based publication The Star Online, connecting to public networks poses a grave risk to your security.

LE Global Services (LGMS) Executive Director Fong Choong Fook said that he would never use a public Wi-Fi because of its privacy risks. Fong’s private cybersecurity firm tests the network security of Malaysia’s major banks using employed hackers.

“Even an IT person may not be able to tell if the access point he is connected to is safe or if the activities are being watched. There may be signs like your Internet is slowing down but hackers can make it so elegant that you won’t even notice,” Fong explained.

Hackers can get between a device and the Wi-Fi router, thus being able to record private data like passwords and credit card information entered into the device, according to Malaysia’s national cyber security agency CyberSecurity Malaysia (CSM). They can also disguise their hacking hardware as Wi-Fi and name it after a restaurant or office, tricking people into connecting to a public access point which they think is secure.

Fong said that this kind of cyberattack has been going on way back in the 1990s.

LGMS demonstrated the procedure, setting up a Wi-Fi using a laptop and named it after a famous restaurant just below its office in Puchong, Selangor. Fong then connected two devices to the Wi-Fi network and logged on to social media and government websites.

The hacker’s computer then recorded all activities from the two devices, every e-mail address, username and password keyed in the device.

Three other devices outside of the experiment connected to the dummy Wi-Fi named after the restaurant.

“Hackers can target one specific person or they can target everyone in a cafe to get their devices to send all their data through their dummy Wi-Fi. When they have your information, they can steal your identity. They can pose as you on Facebook, or send out e-mails to your contacts under your account,” he said.

READ MORE..

Fong advised users to avoid public Wi-Fi and to limit Internet use to Internet searches only if necessary. He also suggested subscribing to VPN (virtual private network) technologies to secure their traffic.

VPN encrypts data on devices, making it hard for hackers to spy on the user’s online activities. Most VPNs are available on a subscription basis.

This year, CSM has recorded eight instances where private Wi-Fi networks were hacked and 1,462 cases of online intrusions have been reported. This is nearly double the number of incidents compared to the same period last year.

CSM also advised users to disable the feature which automatically saves usernames, passwords and other data in the cache and to keep Internet browsers up to date for more secure Internet browsing. Ma. Czarina A. Fernandez, INQUIRER.net trainee/RAM/rga


DIGITALTRENDS.COM

How To Stay Safe On Public Wi-Fi DAVID NIELD 6 JUNE 2016 10:00 AM Discuss 3 Bookmark


If you take a trip today, you’re bound to come across more free public wi-fi spots than ever before. They can be great for getting work done, managing your social media empire, and generally staying connected — but these public networks can also be a major security risk. Here’s what you need to know about using free public wi-fi and how you can keep yourself safe.

Read the terms and conditions carefully

In your eagerness to get an internet connection, it can be tempting to click through whatever welcome screens appear, but you should be very careful to check what you’re signing up for. A big chunk of wi-fi networks are set up in public places by marketing firms who are willing to give you some bandwidth in return for an email address and phone number, for example.

The connection terms and conditions should include details of how your data is going to be used. If you can bear delaying your next Facebook check-in for a few minutes, it pays to read through these in full before deciding whether web access really is worth the information you’re giving up. This is one of those times when it’s handy to have an alternative email address you can make use of.

What’s more, you should stick to advertised, official wi-fi networks that have been set up by the coffee shop, airport, bar or whatever venue you’re in. It’s known that hackers can set up free wi-fi networks to catch gullible citizens looking for free bandwidth. If you see an open, innocuous network that seems too good to be true, then it probably is.

Stick to secure websites and apps

That green padlock that appears in your browser’s address bar when you’re on a secure connection is even more important when you’re on public wi-fi. Think long and hard — and then think again — before doing anything important across an unsecured connection, because it’s going to be much easier for someone else on the same network to grab the data that’s transferred.

If you’re connected on your phone, it’s better to use a mobile browser than an app, because browsers are more fussy when it comes to checking and verifying these HTTPS connections. Essentially, apps can be accepting bogus security credentials without your knowledge, and that’s a problem if you’re doing something important like online banking or buying stuff online.

In terms of mobile apps, you’re really at the mercy of the developer as far as wireless security goes. Sticking to apps from big, well-known names while on public wi-fi will limit the risk (though it’s no guarantee). If you’re using the mobile versions of Chrome or Safari, on the other hand, then you’ve got the same kind of protection in place as you do when using the desktop programs.

Install a VPN app

READ MORE...

On the open, unsecured wi-fi networks that run in many coffee shops and hotels — the only really effective way of protecting yourself against snooping on non-HTTPS websites and apps is to install a VPN (yes — their uses actually go beyond faking which country you’re in).

VPNs (Virtual Private Networks) reroute your traffic through dedicated, encrypted servers, so you need one you can trust. Either pay up for a reputable VPN service or go for a well-known, well-established free one. Most now offer apps for desktop and mobile use, and most of the technical magic is taken care of behind the scenes, so they’re easy to install and use.

We won’t go into a full VPN comparison guide here, but the likes of TunnelBear, IPVanish, CyberGhost, Hotspot Shield and Private Internet Access all come highly recommended, creating an encrypted ‘tunnel’ for your data between your phone or laptop device and the sites you’re browsing on public wi-fi. Meanwhile, Opera’s mobile browser has a built-in VPN too.

Extra safety tips

Don’t download or install anything, if you can help it, and make sure all your system software is up to date (including your security tools). On a laptop, make sure you’re not sharing folders or devices with others on the network. This should be managed automatically for you by your OS when you connect to a public wifi network, but it’s easy to double-check.

On Windows, head to the Network and Sharing Center in Control Panel, then follow the Change advanced sharing settings link — as you’ll notice, you can configure different options for private and public networks that kick in automatically. On OS X, the option can be found under the Sharing entry in System Preferences. Untick the File Sharing box for extra protection.

Logging out of websites when you’re finished with them and telling your laptop or smartphone to ‘forget’ the network after you’ve left can also reduce your security risk. General common sense, like using different passwords for each of your apps and services, will also come in handy should someone manage to steal a look at the data you’re transmitting across the network.

Be aware of the risks

No matter what steps you end up taking to try and stay secure, remember that public networks are inherently more exposed than the ones at your home and place of work. If you’ve got banking or online purchasing to do, then you may well be better off using the cellular connection on your smartphone (or tethering to it if you’re trying to work on a laptop).

Think (at least) twice about typing in passwords, usernames, credit card details or anything else that could be of use to someone else who might be scanning the same network. If you can, stick to activities you don’t mind being snooped on, like flicking through the day’s tech news, watching YouTube or going down another rabbit hole of knowledge on Wikipedia.

Fortunately, the situation is improving, with the bigger and more established free wifi providers making efforts to minimise the security risks, and coffee shops and hotel chains signing deals with external firms who know what they’re doing. Don’t be afraid to get connected while you’re out and about — just make sure you know what you’re doing.

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INQUIRER

Google calls on Filipino youth to join ‘Web Rangers’ program INQUIRER.net
August 1st, 2016 07:23 PM


SCREENGRAB from webrangers.ph

Internet giant Google on Monday opened its doors to a new batch of aspiring “Web Rangers” from the Philippines to support its digital literacy campaign.

Filipinos 15 to 20 years old are invited to take part by signing up at the Web Rangers website (http://webrangers.ph) beginning August 1.

Now on its second year, the competition aims to explore what netizens can do to use the internet for meaningful activities that will help them pursue their passion, develop new talents and skills and discover things that can help them level up.

Sixty young Filipinos will be selected based on their answers to the questions they’ll get in the sign-up sheet.

READ MORE...

Gail Tan, Google Philippines Head of Communications and Public Affairs said, “We’d like to give the Filipino youth an opportunity to use their creativity in the online space for a good cause. Web Rangers is a campaign and competition that will equip them to look at digital as an extension of their creativity where they can turn their ideas into something impactful and truly meaningful to others.”

Participants can choose from available Web Ranger characters: the Innovator, the Visoionary, the Creator, the Analyst and the Inspiration.

The winning campaign will be awarded in October and will be supported by Google Philippines through publicity and outreach. Pisey Sar and Sonita Oum, INQUIRER.net trainees


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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