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VIRAL: JUSTIN BIEBER PLAYED 'POKE GO' NEAR NYC's CENTRAL PARK AND NO ONE RECOGNIZED HIM


JULY 19 -Justin Bieber on July 15, 2016 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic NEW YORK,  No disguise necessary! Justin Bieber was playing Pokémon Go near NYC’s Central Park, and everyone was too wrapped up in the crazy-popular game to recognize him. Justin Bieber's Biggest Scandals Ever  In an Instagram video posted by his manager and pal Scooter Braun in the early hours of Monday, July 18, the pop superstar was seen running in a huge swarm of people in an attempt to catch a rare Pokémon. Players can be heard yelling about the Gyarados as dozens of people run down city blocks and in between cars to capture the creature. The gamers were too busy chasing Pokémon to look up from their phones and see one of the most popular musicians in the world playing alongside them. “This is amazing,” Braun captioned the clip. “@justinbieber and [music video director and Bieber pal] @alfredoflores in nyc looking for Pokemon and no one looks at who is next to them,” he wrote, adding several tears of joy emojis. WATCH VIRAL JAVASCRIPT CLIP HERE: http://alturl.com/7faxw Braun’s video was reminiscent of another Central Park stampede that occurred on Thursday, July 14, when players spotted a super-rare Vaporeon in one of the fields. In the viral clip, massive crowds rush towards the Pokémon’s location, and some players even jump out of vehicles to get in on the action.READ MORE...

ALSO: What can you do when 'Pokémon Go' decides your house is a gym?
[
Augmented reality and private spaces don’t mix]


JULY 12 -When Boon Sheridan decided to convert an old church into his new home, he didn’t think he would end up fending off dozens of would-be pokémon trainers. But that’s exactly what happened when Niantic, the augmented reality gaming company behind Pokémon Go, marked Sheridan’s home as a "gym" — one of the game’s hubs for training and battles, usually located at noteworthy buildings or landmarks. "Can’t wait to talk to my neighbors about it," he wrote on Twitter, noting that the church had been decommissioned decades ago. "So, all these people pulling up at all hours? We don’t know them… and we can’t stop it."
Sheridan’s case is a perfect example of how digital overlays are increasingly affecting our physical spaces. There’s something invasive-feeling about a company that was once owned by Google casually directing its millions of users to go knock on someone’s door, even if only a small set of them will ever make it there. And Pokémon Go isn’t the first location-based service to cause real-world annoyance. Traffic app Waze has irked homeowners who find their once-quiet streets crowded with drivers, for example, and an IP mapping glitch once turned a Kansas farmhouse into ground zero for angry internet users. And unsurprisingly, nobody is sure how the law should handle it. READ MORE...

ALSO: 'Pokémon Go' hits the streets! But for now it is blocked in the Philippines

 
JULY 11 -Pokémon Go allows users to capture Pokémons in the real world via augmented-reality. It is available for both iOS and Android devices. For now it is blocked in the country.(mb.com.ph) The idea behind Pokémon Go is as simple as it is brilliant: leverage on the technology of smartphones to bring a beloved Nintendo classic game to life. By using a smartphone’s GPS, camera, and internet connection, players can now catch Pokémon by walking around in the real world, vigilantly watching their smartphones, hoping for a rare-type encounter.  Pokémon Go is an augmented reality game that works. It has no shortage of fun: you face familiar, cute monsters, there’s always a thrill when your phone vibrates to inform you that there’s a Pokémon nearby, and it actually makes you want to catch them all. You collect your Pokémon, enhance and evolve them, gather items from Pokéstops, and do battle in Pokémon gyms. The wonder of finding Pokémon superimposed on the real world can also make for hilarious screenshots. Catching Pokémons has been simplified. Unlike the Gameboy versions where you have to weaken Pokémon first before trying to catch them, this time, you just have to throw the Pokéball (swipe your phone) to attempt a catch. It’s not hard, but there’s a learning curve here before you get your cute monsters in one throw. Personally, I’ve found looking for Pokémon more fun. Walk through a park and there’s a high chance you’ll face bug-type and flying-type Pokémon. My bus passed some old houses and I was able to catch a ghost-type Pokémon. It’s the little things like this that makes the game more delightful than it should be. READ MORE...

ALSO: Saudi clerics remind followers that Pokémon violates Islamic beliefs


Pokemon go players meet at Sydney Opera House on July 20, 2016 in Sydney, Australia.
Saudi Arabia's top clerics highlighted a fatwa against the game Saudi Arabia’s top clerics have used an official site to remind followers about a 2001 fatwa against Pokémon, following the release of the mobile application Pokémon Go. The 2001 edict, placed as the top story on an official clerical website, states that the Pokémon card game violates Islamic law due to its references to evolution and its use of “the symbols and logos of devious religions and organizations” and other “forbidden images.” The new attention drawn to the fatwa led many to believe that the directive was new or had been renewed, but in an interview with Reuters a Saudi official said there was no change in the status of the fatwa READ MORE...

ALSO  THE FIX: What George W. Bush’s chief speechwriter thinks of the Melania Trump mess


JULY 21 -Melania Trump's 2016 speech vs. Michelle Obama's 2008 speech
Melania Trump’s speech at the GOP convention in Cleveland is drawing comparisons to Michelle Obama’s speech at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. Here’s a side-by-side look at both. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post) In the wake of the media maelstrom over Melania Trump's lifting of several passages from a speech Michelle Obama gave in 2008, I reached out to Michael Gerson, the chief speechwriter for George W. Bush. My goal in talking to Gerson, who is now a syndicated columnist with the Washington Post, was to get a better understanding of how something like this could happen, who should be blamed and what it said about the broader Trump campaign. Our conversation, conducted via email and edited only for grammar, is below. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Justin Bieber Played Pokemon Go Near NYC’s Central Park and No One Recognized Him


Justin Bieber on July 15, 2016 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

NEW YORK, JULY 18, 2016 (US MAGAZINE ONLINE) July 18, 2016 @ 6:20 PM By Megan French - No disguise necessary! Justin Bieber was playing Pokémon Go near NYC’s Central Park, and everyone was too wrapped up in the crazy-popular game to recognize him.

Justin Bieber's Biggest Scandals Ever

In an Instagram video posted by his manager and pal Scooter Braun in the early hours of Monday, July 18, the pop superstar was seen running in a huge swarm of people in an attempt to catch a rare Pokémon.

Players can be heard yelling about the Gyarados as dozens of people run down city blocks and in between cars to capture the creature.

The gamers were too busy chasing Pokémon to look up from their phones and see one of the most popular musicians in the world playing alongside them.

Stars With Justin Bieber's Hair!


“This is amazing,” Braun captioned the clip. “@justinbieber and [music video director and Bieber pal] @alfredoflores in nyc looking for Pokemon and no one looks at who is next to them,” he wrote, adding several tears of joy emojis. WATCH VIRAL JAVASCRIPT CLIP HERE: http://alturl.com/7faxw

Braun’s video was reminiscent of another Central Park stampede that occurred on Thursday, July 14, when players spotted a super-rare Vaporeon in one of the fields.

In the viral clip, massive crowds rush towards the Pokémon’s location, and some players even jump out of vehicles to get in on the action.

READ MORE...

Bieber isn’t the only celeb to get hooked on the augmented reality app, which is based on the ‘90s Nintendo game. John Mayer spent $99.99 for 14,500 PokeCoins on July 10 and posted a screenshot of his purchase.

Tyga was spotted ignoring his girlfriend, Kylie Jenner, while checking for Pokémon at the Budapest airport on July 12, and Nick Jonas tweeted about his tourmate Demi Lovato’s Pokémon Go obsession getting out of hand.

Celebs With Bieber Fever!

While the game has captivated the country and encouraged gamers to explore and exercise, there have also been plenty of bizarre and scary incidents stemming from the game.

Numerous thieves have used the game’s location features to target unsuspecting players, several car crashes have occurred due to playing while driving, and one teen even discovered a dead body while searching for water Pokémon.


THE VERGE ONLINE

What can you do when Pokémon Go decides your house is a gym?
Augmented reality and private spaces don’t mix
By Adi Robertson on July 12, 2016 04:46 pm Email @thedextriarchy
20

When Boon Sheridan decided to convert an old church into his new home, he didn’t think he would end up fending off dozens of would-be pokémon trainers.

But that’s exactly what happened when Niantic, the augmented reality gaming company behind Pokémon Go, marked Sheridan’s home as a "gym" — one of the game’s hubs for training and battles, usually located at noteworthy buildings or landmarks.

"Can’t wait to talk to my neighbors about it," he wrote on Twitter, noting that the church had been decommissioned decades ago. "So, all these people pulling up at all hours? We don’t know them… and we can’t stop it."

Sheridan’s case is a perfect example of how digital overlays are increasingly affecting our physical spaces.

There’s something invasive-feeling about a company that was once owned by Google casually directing its millions of users to go knock on someone’s door, even if only a small set of them will ever make it there.

And Pokémon Go isn’t the first location-based service to cause real-world annoyance. Traffic app Waze has irked homeowners who find their once-quiet streets crowded with drivers, for example, and an IP mapping glitch once turned a Kansas farmhouse into ground zero for angry internet users.

And unsurprisingly, nobody is sure how the law should handle it.

READ MORE...

"This is a kind of a novel problem," says Ryan Calo, who teaches cyber and privacy law at the University of Washington’s school of law. Usually, a digital platform isn’t responsible for what its users do — whether it’s something as mild as posting inflammatory comments on a message board or as extreme as following an explosives recipe on a website. Neither is a game.

But Pokémon Go isn’t just offering information, it’s actively creating a system that encourages people to visit certain locations to participate. "This is a situation where in order to play the game, individuals have to physically travel," says Calo. And if large numbers of them end up on private property, someone could allege that Niantic showed negligence in setting up the game’s locations.

"WHEN YOU PUT A POKÉMON GYM IN SOMEONE’S HOME, YOU HAVE TO KNOW THAT THAT PERSON’S GOING TO BE BOTHERED."

"When you put a Pokémon gym in someone's home, you have to know that that person's going to be bothered, harassed," says Calo. "It's readily foreseeable that people would get hurt; it's readily foreseeable that people would be a nuisance."

Similarly, Stanford Center for Internet and Society affiliate scholar Bryant Walker Smith suggests that an attorney could argue Niantic was encouraging players to trespass — which could leave the company open for liability even if it’s not engaging in outright criminal behavior.

Still, Calo says the game’s creators would have a strong First Amendment defense, and Pokémon Go’s user agreement explicitly forbids users from entering private property without permission, giving it some cover.

"I think within property law and community-driven laws like noise ordinances, there are plenty of ways that law enforcement can manage day-to-day nuisance issues or other complaints by property owners," says Nathan Freitas, a fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

"Otherwise, it will likely need to bubble up to a higher-level legislative decisions on [augmented and mixed reality] impacts on communities, and what to do about them, not unlike what has happened with mobile phones and driving."

Niantic isn’t intentionally trying to send players to anyone’s home, and as long as it responds quickly to reports, issues like Sheridan’s could be resolved almost immediately. "PokeStops and Gyms in Pokémon Go are found at publicly accessible places such as historical markers, public art installations, museums and monuments,"

Niantic and The Pokémon Company told The Verge in a joint statement, urging people to report inappropriate locations online. "We will take relevant steps at that point based on the nature of the inquiry."

How promptly they will do so is another question — Sheridan told us that his local gym still hasn't been moved, and an older version of the support page said to only report locations that pose an immediate physical danger.

YOU’RE NOT JUST APPEARING AT A LOCATION, YOU’RE (PROBABLY) TAKING VIDEO OF IT

None of this diminishes the social responsibilities that augmented reality developers have. Since Pokémon Go launched last week, we’ve seen clear cases where catching pokémon is certainly legal, but in poor taste: the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC, for example.

Freitas suggests that actively addressing complaints is in Niantic’s best interests, even if there’s no imminent legal danger. He brings up the example of Yik Yak, a geolocation-based social app that blocked access around middle and high school campuses after it was used for threats and bullying.

And while simply directing players to a location is one thing, other aspects of augmented reality gaming open up bigger privacy questions. Pokémon Go, for example, asks users to turn on their cameras to see pokémon "appear" in the real world. Effectively, this means capturing video of everything the player looks at.

"If you did that in a bathroom or a boardroom — or even if it’s someone's private space, like through a window — you could implicate privacy law there," says Calo.

Niantic has been sending players out into the world for years through its previous game Ingress, and scavenger hunt-style activities like geocaching are even older.

But this is the first time one has captured such a broad audience or had such a visible social impact, even if it ends up lasting only a few weeks or months.

It exists at a time where someone’s physical location is turning into an increasingly potent weapon against them, through practices like doxxing and swatting — and where we’re more worried than ever about losing control over how companies collect and distribute our data.

If anything is going to force us to confront the impact that augmented reality can have on the real world, it might as well be pokémon.

Update July 12th, 5:15PM ET: Added comment from Boon Sheridan on Niantic's response.


MANILA BULLETIN

Pokémon Go hits the streets! by Mark Isaiah David July 11, 2016 Share15 Tweet3 Share11 Email4 Share1.3K


Pokémon Go allows users to capture Pokémons in the real world via augmented-reality. It is available for both iOS and Android devices. For now it is blocked in the country.(mb.com.ph

The idea behind Pokémon Go is as simple as it is brilliant: leverage on the technology of smartphones to bring a beloved Nintendo classic game to life. By using a smartphone’s GPS, camera, and internet connection, players can now catch Pokémon by walking around in the real world, vigilantly watching their smartphones, hoping for a rare-type encounter.

 Pokémon Go is an augmented reality game that works. It has no shortage of fun: you face familiar, cute monsters, there’s always a thrill when your phone vibrates to inform you that there’s a Pokémon nearby, and it actually makes you want to catch them all. You collect your Pokémon, enhance and evolve them, gather items from Pokéstops, and do battle in Pokémon gyms. The wonder of finding Pokémon superimposed on the real world can also make for hilarious screenshots.

Catching Pokémons has been simplified. Unlike the Gameboy versions where you have to weaken Pokémon first before trying to catch them, this time, you just have to throw the Pokéball (swipe your phone) to attempt a catch. It’s not hard, but there’s a learning curve here before you get your cute monsters in one throw.

Personally, I’ve found looking for Pokémon more fun. Walk through a park and there’s a high chance you’ll face bug-type and flying-type Pokémon. My bus passed some old houses and I was able to catch a ghost-type Pokémon. It’s the little things like this that makes the game more delightful than it should be.

READ MORE...

Best of all – you can play the game and enjoy it fully without getting robbed by in-app micro-transactions. That’s a statement many games claim, but Pokémon Go actually delivers. The game is generous;you can find virtually everything you need by playing the game as it was intended– by walking around in the real world.

Because the game is fun, it has a wonderful side-effect: I’ve found it to be the best fitness app I’ve ever tried. So many fitness apps try to gameify their program to make it more fun, Pokémon Go does it natively and without making fitness feel like a punishment. You end up walking a little bit further, spending more time outdoors in hopping between Pokéstops and searching for more powerful Pokémon. My second day as a wannabe Pokémon master resulted in more than 21,000 steps – more than double my daily average.

There are Day1 bugs and issues that bog down gameplay, like losing GPS connection even with stable network connection.

Battles continue even when they have 0 HP. And Pokémon Go devours battery life like no other. It makes sense because you’re utilizing so many things in your smartphone simultaneously, but the issue still needs to be addressed.

But these bugs will eventually be ironed out; games like Pokémon Go will be popular for years.

(The author currently resides in Switzerland, allowing him to try out Pokémon Go without restrictions — Editor)


TIME MAGAZINE

Saudi Clerics Remind Followers That Pokémon Violates Islamic Beliefs Emma Ockerman @eockerman July 20, 2016 Updated: July 21, 2016 8:00 PM ET Brendon Thorne—Getty Images


Pokemon go players meet at Sydney Opera House on July 20, 2016 in Sydney, Australia.

Saudi Arabia's top clerics highlighted a fatwa against the game

Saudi Arabia’s top clerics have used an official site to remind followers about a 2001 fatwa against Pokémon, following the release of the mobile application Pokémon Go.

The 2001 edict, placed as the top story on an official clerical website, states that the Pokémon card game violates Islamic law due to its references to evolution and its use of “the symbols and logos of devious religions and organizations” and other “forbidden images.”

The new attention drawn to the fatwa led many to believe that the directive was new or had been renewed, but in an interview with Reuters a Saudi official said there was no change in the status of the fatwa

READ MORE...

“The Council of Senior Religious Scholars denied that it issued a new fatwa about the Pokémon game, and the media reports of that are not accurate,” Abdulmohsen Alyas, undersecretary for international communication and media at the Ministry of Culture and Information, told the news service.

While no new fatwa has been issued, a link to the 2001 fatwa against the Pokémon game appears as the top post on homepage of the General Presidency of Scholarly Research and Ifta’s website. The opinion is absent from the homepage of the committee’s english language website.

The news follows Kuwait’s Interior Ministry warning Pokémon fanatics last week to avoid playing the augmented reality video game at mosques, shopping centers, malls and oil installations. In Egypt, Hamdi Bakheet, a member of the committee of defense and national security, said the game might be used for espionage by Egypt’s enemies, the Times of Israel reports.

Update: The original version of this story incorrectly described the status of the anti-Pokémon fatwa.


WASHINGTOM POST

THE FIX: What George W. Bush’s chief speechwriter thinks of the Melania Trump mess By Chris Cillizza July 19


Melania Trump's 2016 speech vs. Michelle Obama's 2008 speech

Melania Trump’s speech at the GOP convention in Cleveland is drawing comparisons to Michelle Obama’s speech at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver.

Here’s a side-by-side look at both. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

In the wake of the media maelstrom over Melania Trump's lifting of several passages from a speech Michelle Obama gave in 2008, I reached out to Michael Gerson, the chief speechwriter for George W. Bush. My goal in talking to Gerson, who is now a syndicated columnist with the Washington Post, was to get a better understanding of how something like this could happen, who should be blamed and what it said about the broader Trump campaign.

Our conversation, conducted via email and edited only for grammar, is below.

READ MORE...

FIX: Explain how the vetting process for a George W. speech might go. How many people look at it? How many times is the language checked?

Gerson: The vetting process in a presidential campaign is a bit looser than in the White House, where the staffing process includes maybe 15 sets of eyes on every speech and the speechwriting office produces a version of the speech with every factual claim footnoted.

The decision-making team in a presidential campaign is typically much smaller. And a lot of the pressure to vet is placed on speechwriting staff. The candidate and campaign inner circle will give close attention to key speeches, but are generally focused on big-picture content.

How often are mistakes like this made? Assuming you look at lots of speeches from the past while writing any speech for the present? And how do you avoid things like this happening?

Presidential candidates often are (and should be) inspired by the great rhetoric of the past. And the themes of American politics are consistent over time. The problem comes in the close and distinctive use of sentences and paragraphs. At this point, inspiration becomes dependence. It generally falls to the speechwriter (or speechwriting staff) in a campaign to guard against this type of unacceptable dependence.

Who, ultimately, is to blame for plagiarism like this? The candidate? The campaign manager? The speechwriter? The spouse?

This was a staff failure, indicating a weak campaign apparatus.

Do you remember anything like this happening at a convention before? Or at a big national news event?

There have been a few cases (such as during Joe Biden’s first run for president) where rhetorical dependence was politically damaging. But I imagine that people will cut a candidate’s wife more slack.

Finish this sentence: “An error like the one Melania Trump committed last night tells us _____________ about the campaign.” Now, explain.

An error like the one Melania Trump committed last night tells us that the Trump campaign lacks seriousness and structure, which is also demonstrated by its divisive style, weak ground game and poor fundraising numbers.


Chris Cillizza writes “The Fix,” a politics blog for the Washington Post. He also covers the White House.


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