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INTEL DECLARES INDEPENDENCE FROM THE PC AS IT LAYS OUT A BROADER 5-POINT STRATEGY[The PC's just another 'connected thing' in this new world order].


APRIL 26 -'The only thing more amazing than our technology is what the world does with it'-INTEL CORP  --Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich (not shown) has thrown off the shackles of the PC, ushering Intel into a more democratic world of billions of connected devices. The PC's just another 'connected thing' in this new world order. The message has trickled down in speeches, earnings calls, and analyst presentations, but on Tuesday, Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich drew a line in the sand: Intel is not a PC company any more. Up to 30% off Amazon Kindle and Fire Tablets - Deal Alert amazon fire tablet Through May 7, Amazon has discounted various models of Kindle and Fire Tablets. More Dealposts In what only can be called a manifesto of Intel’s new values, Krzanich described how Intel is transforming itself “from a PC company to a company that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices.” To drive the point home, Krzanich noted that the PC is just one among many connected devices. What might be called the “new” Intel will be built upon five pillars, Krzanich said: The cloud—including servers, data centers, and virtualization Connected “things,” such as sensors, autonomous vehicles, or PCs An evolving memory business, from 3D XPoint memory to advances in server and data center infrastructure Connectivity, specifically 5G networking Manufacturing and the underlying fab technology. About 40 percent of Intel’s revenue and 60 percent of its profit margin already come from outside the PC, Krzanich said last week, when the company began publicly signalling its new focus. “It’s time to make this transition and to push the company over all the way to that strategy and that strategic direction,” Krzanich said then. “That’s why we wanted to do it now.” READ MORE...

ALSO: ABOUT - Intel Corporation


Intel Desktop Board D915GUXCopyright Intel Corporation American company Written by: Mark Hall SHARE: READ VIEW ALL MEDIA (4) VIEW HISTORY EDIT FEEDBACK Intel Corporation, Intel Desktop Board D915GUX [Credit: Copyright Intel Corporation]American manufacturer of semiconductor computer circuits. It is headquartered in Santa Clara, Calif. The company’s name comes from “integrated electronics.”  Intel was founded in July 1968 by American engineers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore. Unlike the archetypal Silicon Valley start-up business with its fabled origins in a youthful founder’s garage, Intel opened its doors with $2.5 million in funding arranged by Arthur Rock, the American financier who coined the term venture capitalist. Intel’s founders were experienced, middle-aged technologists who had established reputations. Noyce was the coinventor in 1959 of the silicon integrated circuit when he was general manager of Fairchild Semiconductor, a division of Fairchild Camera and Instrument. Moore was the head of research and development at Fairchild Semiconductor. Immediately after founding Intel, Noyce and Moore recruited other Fairchild employees, including Hungarian-born American businessman Andrew Grove. Noyce, Moore, and Grove served as chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) in succession during the first three decades of the company’s history. Intel’s initial products were memory chips, including the world’s first metal oxide semiconductor, the 1101, which did not sell well. However, its sibling, the 1103, a one-kilobit dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) chip, was successful and the first chip to store a significant amount of information. It was purchased first by the American technology company Honeywell Incorporated in 1970 to replace the core memory technology in its computers. Because DRAMs were cheaper and used less power than core memory, they quickly became the standard memory devices in computers worldwide. Following its DRAM success, Intel became a public company in 1971. That same year Intel introduced the erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) chip, which was the company’s most successful product line until 1985. Also in 1971 Intel engineers Ted Hoff, Federico Faggin, and Stan Mazor invented a general-purpose four-bit microprocessor and the first single-chip microprocessor, the 4004, under contract to the Japanese calculator manufacturer Nippon Calculating Machine Corporation, which let Intel retain all rights to the technology. READ MORE.

ALSO: Cloud Computing Technology from Intel


Not all clouds are created equal. Intel® Cloud Technology, a set of technologies built into the latest generation Intel Xeon® processors, provides the performance and protection you need through capabilities that enhance how well your cloud moves, processes and safeguards data.
The Powered by Intel Cloud Technology program can help you choose from a broad range of services developed by cloud service providers (CSPs) that specifically optimize for Intel® processors. The result is an agile, scalable cloud you can count on with the power and capabilities to handle your most data-intensive workloads. Know what powers your public cloud Deploy with confidence knowing that the technology that runs in your data center also runs in your public cloud. Find out about the specific Intel® cloud technologies that help power and protect your business. READ MORE, WATCH VIDEO...


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Intel declares independence from the PC as it lays out a broader 5-point strategy

CYBERSPACE, MAY 2, 2016 (TECH-CONNECT) By  Mark Hachman — Senior Editor Follow PCWORLD | APR 26, 2016 2:18 PM PT - Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich (not shown) has thrown off the shackles of the PC, ushering Intel into a more democratic world of billions of connected devices. The PC's just another 'connected thing' in this new world order.

The message has trickled down in speeches, earnings calls, and analyst presentations, but on Tuesday, Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich drew a line in the sand: Intel is not a PC company any more.

 In what only can be called a manifesto of Intel’s new values, Krzanich described how Intel is transforming itself “from a PC company to a company that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices.” To drive the point home, Krzanich noted that the PC is just one among many connected devices.



The PC's just another 'connected thing' in this new world order

What might be called the “new” Intel will be built upon five pillars, Krzanich said:

•The cloud—including servers, data centers, and virtualization

•Connected “things,” such as sensors, autonomous vehicles, or PCs

•An evolving memory business, from 3D XPoint memory to advances in server and data center infrastructure

•Connectivity, specifically 5G networking

•Manufacturing and the underlying fab technology. 

About 40 percent of Intel’s revenue and 60 percent of its profit margin already come from outside the PC, Krzanich said last week, when the company began publicly signaling its new focus.

 “It’s time to make this transition and to push the company over all the way to that strategy and that strategic direction,” Krzanich said then. “That’s why we wanted to do it now.”

READ MORE...

Cloud first—wait, we’ve heard this before

Historically, Intel has been built on a single foundation: the microprocessor, which powered the majority of the world’s PCs, then servers, then notebooks.

Now, Intel’s evolution looks surprisingly like that of Microsoft: predicated upon the cloud and potentially billions of connected, mobile devices, with a broad, diversified product line to address a multitude of opportunities.

“We will also lead by becoming a company with a broader focus, and with sharper execution,” Krzanich wrote Tuesday. “ In doing so, we will create lasting value for our customers, partners and shareholders, and achieve our mission to lead in a smart, connected world.”

Intel Intel’s “virtuous cycle” of growth. You had only to attend Intel’s Intel Developer Forum conference last August to see this coming: Krzanich barely mentioned the company’s Skylake PC processor, focusing on Intel’s push in the Internet of Things instead. Ditto for Krzanich’s CES 2016 keynote address, where he played ringmaster to a circus of devices showing off Intel’s embedded silicon. Finally, Krzanich reorganized Intel shortly before announcing its first-quarter earnings, where he divulged that each of its PC and IoT projects were being evaluated for possible cancellation


Intel believes processors like this Xeon E5 chip will power tomorrow’s data centers.

Popular on TechConnect overall The best laptops of 2016: Budget PCs, 2-in-1s, Ultrabooks and more win10upgradedialog Windows 7 users complain of unprovoked Windows 10 auto-upgrades photo of apple quicktime logo Uninstall now! Apple abandons QuickTime for Windows despite lingering critical... Now, like Microsoft, Intel sees the cloud as the driver of Intel’s business. The company can charge thousands of dollars for a Xeon processor that powers a server, but just a fraction of that for a standard Core chip.

Krzanich wrote that Intel plans to attack the data center on two key fronts: virtualization, which creates demand for pricey, high-end chips by using them to power many “virtual PCs” in the cloud; and analytics, which takes all the data being collected by the cloud from sensors and other devices, and extracts information from it. The latter capability, of course, requires even more server hardware.

Krzanich also pledged to drive “more and more of the footprint of the data center to Intel architecture.” Try as it might, AMD has continued to lose share in the enterprise—though it recently tried to steal some back with a licensing effort.

Putting the PC in its place

For months now, Intel executives have offered variations on the same line: “Everything’s connected, and everything that’s connected, computes.” Intel plans to lead in the technology around connected things, Kzanich pledged.

“’Things’ range from PCs to what we now call the Internet of Things,” Krzanich explained. “The Internet of Things encompasses all smart devices—every device, sensor, console and any other client device—that are connected to the cloud. The key phrase here is ‘connected to the cloud.’ It means that everything that a ‘thing’ does can be captured as a piece of data, measured real-time, and is accessible from anywhere.”


Yuneec’s Typhoon H drone James Niccolai The PC is a device. So is this Yuneec Typhoon H drone, with an embedded Intel RealSense camera that Krzanich is holding. Guess which generates more data?

You Might Also Like Xamarin starts to connect Mac devs with Visual Studio robin 2 Nextbit's latest Robin update adds Marshmallow and drastically improves camera htc vive HTC doubles down on virtual reality with new Vive X accelerator In Intel’s world, devices are simply means of producing (not consuming!) data. And the amount of data you produce, tapping away at your computer, is potentially minuscule compared to the data sampled by the LiDAR sensor of a self-driving car. That’s important to realize: At one time, PCs demanded so much data that they could bog down the available network bandwidth and compute power of a client device. Today, machines talking to machines generate those workloads.

“At Intel, we will focus on autonomous vehicles, industrial and retail as our primary growth drivers of the Internet of Things,” Krzanich wrote. “Similarly, we view our core client business of PCs and mobile as among the many variations of connected things, which is driving our strategy of differentiation and segmentation in the Internet of Things business.”

Intel doubles down on 5G connectivity

What’s unclear about that strategy is whether Intel intends to compete with ARM in powering smartphone processors. The recent, quiet departure of a key embedded exec, Aicha Evans, indicates that Intel has failed for the moment. But Krzanich and Intel clearly intend to double down on their investments in 5G connectivity, as Krzanich pledged that Intel would lead in this new sector.

I
ntel seems happy to pass routers like this Asus RT-SC5300 by if it can connect billions of embedded devices instead.

“Threading all of this virtuous cycle together is connectivity – the fact that providing computing power to a device and connecting it to the cloud makes it more valuable,” Krzanich wrote.

It’s worth noting that Intel has invested heavily before in next-generation wireless solutions that failed miserably—WiMAX, anyone? This time around, however, Intel apparently is pursuing a more conventional route.

The wild cards: memory, programmable solutions

Krzanich also highlighted how recent innovations would drive the company's future. 3D XPoint or Optane memory technology could be game-changing: far faster than SSDs, Intel sees it as a possibility for either memory or storage within high-performance PCs and servers. Intel’s other moonshots include silicon photonics, which swaps electricity for light in connecting chips and boards; and integrated FPGAs and conventional silicon, which offer the possibility of actually reprogramming the chip to make it more efficient or perform specialized tasks.


 Intel’s Optane technology promises “1,000” the gate performance of an SSD.

All of these represent a luxury Intel has: By consistently pulling in profits using its current technology, Intel can continue to fund its moonshot innovations. Over time, Intel hopes, they’ll become the next big thing.

The foundation for it all: manufacturing

Intel, of course, has become synonymous with Moore’s Law, the axiom that semiconductor density will double about every two years. Intel grew to dominate its industry by pretty consistently hitting that target. By alternating manufacturing advances with processor advances, Intel has been able to offer a choice: Do you want higher performance from its processors, lower power, or something in between?

As far as device performance goes, however, that’s reaching a wall. Now, PC performance is often measured more by how many computing cores are within them then by the speed they run at. With the shift toward mobile devices, customers are demanding phones and tablets that remain powered on for longer. And you might think that’s what Intel’s building upon for the next generation.


Intel Manufacturing will be at the heart of Intel’s business for years to come.

Not quite. “Moore’s Law is fundamentally a law of economics, and Intel will confidently continue to harness its value,” Krzanich wrote. “The law says that we can shrink transistor dimensions by roughly 50% at a roughly fixed cost, thus driving twice the transistors for the same cost (or the same number of transistors for half the cost).”

What Krzanich is saying is that Intel believes it can take the same processor and make it physically smaller, but for the same manufacturing cost. Alternatively, it could take the same chip and make it more powerful, by doubling the transistor count. Finally, Krzanich is saying that Intel could also choose to manufacture the same chip at a significantly lower price point.

This dovetails nicely with Intel’s newly articulated strategy of embedding computational capabilities in as many devices as possible, shrinking down processors to a point where you’ll simply expect sensors and wearables to embed computational capabilities. Meanwhile, it can dial up computational horsepower where it needs to, while also adjusting its prices for an increasingly competitive PC market.

Intel’s new business model—embedded devices talking with one another and the cloud, and becoming more powerful with each new generation—is what Krzanich called a “virtuous cycle,” with each segment of its business adding momentum.

There are still a few rough edges—for one thing, where Intel’s McAfee security business plays into this. What’s clear, however, is that Krzanich has taken one of the most dramatic steps in Intel’s history. Intel simply isn’t a PC company any more.


BRITAINCA.COM

Intel Corporation


Intel Desktop Board D915GUXCopyright Intel Corporation

American company Written by: Mark Hall SHARE: READ VIEW ALL MEDIA (4) VIEW HISTORY EDIT FEEDBACK Intel Corporation, Intel Desktop Board D915GUX [Credit: Copyright Intel Corporation]American manufacturer of semiconductor computer circuits. It is headquartered in Santa Clara, Calif. The company’s name comes from “integrated electronics.”

Intel was founded in July 1968 by American engineers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore. Unlike the archetypal Silicon Valley start-up business with its fabled origins in a youthful founder’s garage, Intel opened its doors with $2.5 million in funding arranged by Arthur Rock, the American financier who coined the term venture capitalist. Intel’s founders were experienced, middle-aged technologists who had established reputations. Noyce was the coinventor in 1959 of the silicon integrated circuit when he was general manager of Fairchild Semiconductor, a division of Fairchild Camera and Instrument. Moore was the head of research and development at Fairchild Semiconductor. Immediately after founding Intel, Noyce and Moore recruited other Fairchild employees, including Hungarian-born American businessman Andrew Grove. Noyce, Moore, and Grove served as chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) in succession during the first three decades of the company’s history.

Intel’s initial products were memory chips, including the world’s first metal oxide semiconductor, the 1101, which did not sell well. However, its sibling, the 1103, a one-kilobit dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) chip, was successful and the first chip to store a significant amount of information. It was purchased first by the American technology company Honeywell Incorporated in 1970 to replace the core memory technology in its computers. Because DRAMs were cheaper and used less power than core memory, they quickly became the standard memory devices in computers worldwide.

Following its DRAM success, Intel became a public company in 1971. That same year Intel introduced the erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) chip, which was the company’s most successful product line until 1985. Also in 1971 Intel engineers Ted Hoff, Federico Faggin, and Stan Mazor invented a general-purpose four-bit microprocessor and the first single-chip microprocessor, the 4004, under contract to the Japanese calculator manufacturer Nippon Calculating Machine Corporation, which let Intel retain all rights to the technology.

READ MORE...

Not all of Intel’s early endeavours were successful. In 1972 management decided to enter the growing digital watch market by purchasing Microma. But Intel had no real understanding of consumers and sold the watchmaking company in 1978 at a loss of $15 million. In 1974 Intel controlled 82.9 percent of the DRAM chip market, but, with the rise of foreign semiconductor companies, the company’s market share dipped to 1.3 percent by 1984. By that time, however, Intel had shifted from memory chips and become focused on its microprocessor business: in 1972 it produced the 8008, an eight-bit central processing unit (CPU); the 8080, which was 10 times faster than the 8008, came two years later; and in 1978 the company built its first 16-bit microprocessor, the 8086.

In 1981 the American computer manufacturer International Business Machines (IBM) chose Intel’s 16-bit 8088 to be the CPU in its first mass-produced personal computer (PC). Intel also provided its microprocessors to other manufacturers that made PC “clones” that were compatible with IBM’s product. The IBM PC and its clones ignited the demand for desktop and portable computers. IBM had contracted with a small firm in Redmond, Wash., Microsoft Corporation, to provide the disk operating system (DOS) for its PC. Eventually Microsoft supplied its Windows operating system to IBM PCs, which, with a combination of Windows software and Intel chips, were dubbed “Wintel” machines and have dominated the market since their inception.

Of the many microprocessors Intel has produced, perhaps the most important was the 80386, a 32-bit chip released in 1985 that started the company’s commitment to make all future microprocessors backward-compatible with previous CPUs. Application developers and PC owners could then be assured that software that worked on older Intel machines would run on the newest models.

With the introduction of the Pentium microprocessor in 1993, Intel left behind its number-oriented product naming conventions for trademarked names for its microprocessors. The Pentium was the first Intel chip for PCs to use parallel, or superscalar, processing, which significantly increased its speed. It had 3.1 million transistors, compared with the 1.2 million transistors of its predecessor, the 80486. Combined with Microsoft’s Windows 3.x operating system, the much faster Pentium chip helped spur significant expansion of the PC market. Although businesses still bought most PCs, the higher-performance Pentium machines made it possible for consumers to use PCs for multimedia, graphical applications such as games like Doom and Wing Commander that required more processing power.


Moore’s law [Credit: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.] A prediction made by American engineer Gordon Moore in 1965 that the number of transistors per silicon chip doubles every year.

Intel’s business strategy relied on making newer microprocessors dramatically faster than previous ones to entice buyers to upgrade their PCs. One way to accomplish this was to manufacture chips with vastly more transistors in each device. For example, the 8088 found in the first IBM PC had 29,000 transistors, while the 80386 unveiled four years later included 275,000, and the Core 2 Quad introduced in 2008 had more than 800,000,000 transistors. The Itanium 9500, which was released in 2012, had 3,100,000,000 transistors. This growth in transistor count became known as Moore’s law, named after company cofounder Gordon Moore, who observed in 1965 that the transistor count on a silicon chip would double approximately annually; he revised it in 1975 to a doubling every two years.

In order to increase consumer brand awareness, in 1991 Intel began subsidizing computer advertisements on the condition that the ads included the company’s “Intel inside” label. Under the cooperative program, Intel set aside a portion of the money that each computer manufacturer spent annually on Intel chips, from which Intel contributed half the cost of that company’s print and television ads during the year. Although the program directly cost Intel hundreds of millions of dollars each year, it had the desired effect of establishing Intel as a conspicuous brand name.


Pentium: Intel Pentium 4 processor [Credit: © Intel Corporation]

Intel’s famed technical prowess was not without mishaps. Its greatest mistake was the so-called “Pentium flaw,” in which an obscure segment among the Pentium CPU’s 3.1 million transistors performed division incorrectly. Company engineers discovered the problem after the product’s release in 1993 but decided to keep quiet and fix the problem in updates to the chip. However, mathematician Thomas Nicely of Lynchburg College in West Virginia also discovered the flaw. At first Grove (then CEO) resisted requests to recall the product. But when IBM announced it would not ship computers with the CPU, it forced a recall that cost Intel $475 million.

Although bruised by the Pentium fiasco, the combination of Intel technology with Microsoft software continued to crush the competition. Rival products from the semiconductor company Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), the wireless communications company Motorola, the computer workstation manufacturer Sun Microsystems, and others rarely threatened Intel’s market share. As a result, the Wintel duo consistently faced accusations of being monopolies. In 1999 Microsoft was found guilty in a U.S. district court of being a monopolist after being sued by the Department of Justice, while in 2009 the European Union fined Intel $1.45 billion for alleged monopolistic actions. In 2009, Intel also paid AMD $1.25 billion to settle a decades-long legal dispute in which AMD accused Intel of pressuring PC makers not to use the former’s chips.

By the mid-1990s Intel had expanded beyond the chip business. Large PC makers, such as IBM and Hewlett-Packard, were able to design and manufacture Intel-based computers for their markets. However, Intel wanted other, smaller PC makers to get their products and, therefore, Intel’s chips to market faster, so it began to design and build “motherboards” that contained all the essential parts of the computer, including graphics and networking chips. By 1995 the company was selling more than 10 million motherboards to PC makers, about 40 percent of the overall PC market. In the early 21st century the Taiwan-based manufacturer ASUSTeK had surpassed Intel as the leading maker of PC motherboards.

By the end of the century, Intel and compatible chips from companies like AMD were found in every PC except Apple Inc.’s Macintosh, which had used CPUs from Motorola since 1984. Craig Barrett, who succeeded Grove as Intel CEO in 1998, was able to close that gap. In 2005 Apple CEO Steven Jobs shocked the industry when he announced future Apple PCs would use Intel CPUs. Therefore, with the exception of some high-performance computers, called servers, and mainframes, Intel and Intel-compatible microprocessors can be found in virtually every PC.

Paul Otellini succeeded Barrett as Intel’s CEO in 2005. Jane Shaw replaced Barrett as chairman in 2009, when the company was ranked 61st on the Fortune 500 list of the largest American companies.

Mark Hall
CONTRIBUTOR, Britanica
Coauthor of Sunburst: The Ascent of Sun Microsystems.


INTEL CORPORATION ONLINE

Cloud Computing Technology

Not all clouds are created equal. Intel® Cloud Technology, a set of technologies built into the latest generation Intel Xeon® processors, provides the performance and protection you need through capabilities that enhance how well your cloud moves, processes and safeguards data.

The Powered by Intel Cloud Technology program can help you choose from a broad range of services developed by cloud service providers (CSPs) that specifically optimize for Intel® processors. The result is an agile, scalable cloud you can count on with the power and capabilities to handle your most data-intensive workloads.


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Know what powers your public cloud Deploy with confidence knowing that the technology that runs in your data center also runs in your public cloud. Find out about the specific Intel® cloud technologies that help power and protect your business.

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Learn about the Powered by Intel® Cloud Technology program (3:56)CLICK SCREENGRAB IMAGE.


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Choose performance and protection The Powered by Intel Cloud Technology badge makes it easy to find CSPs who utilize genuine Intel processors and provide reliable, industry-leading performance, and quality.

Find out how public cloud can help your business (4:11) >


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What is in your data center’s future? Futurist Steve Brown describes the technology potential enabled by next-generation data centers in which infrastructure is modernized for cloud deployments and applications are optimized for cloud services delivery.

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URL: Public Cloud vs. Private Cloud vs. Hybrid Cloud

This video compares and contrasts public, private, and hybrid clouds: the basic elements of each, the features and benefits that each delivers, and how each type meets specific business needs.


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