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PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

REPORT: EL NIÑO -2015/2016 IN THE PHILIPPINES

AL GORE INSPECTS SOLAR PROJECT AT MALL OF ASIA


During his visit to the SM Mall of Asia Solar Carpark, former US Vice President Al Gore was accompanied by (left to right) Hans Sy, President of SM Prime; Sen. Loren Legarda, UN Global Champion for Climate and Disaster Resilience; Leandro Leviste, president of Solar Philippines; and Hans Sy Jr., vice president of SM Prime. SM Prime Holdings Former US Vice President Al Gore inspected the recently finished SM Mall of Asia (MOA) Solar Carpark during his visit in the country. Gore was in the country to lead a three-day workshop which educated civic leaders on climate change. He called on Filipinos to end dependence on coal and predicted that the Philippines can become one of the world’s first 100-percent solar-powered economies given its abundant natural solar resource. He cited the Solar Carpark at MOA during his presentation in terms of how the Philippines is adopting clean energy. The 2.7-MW MOA Solar Carpark is nearly twice the size of the 1.5-MW SM North Edsa Solar Carpark. It is comprised of 10,426 solar panels and 40 inverters, supplying almost 20 percent of the mall’s power needs.
It is expected to offset over 80,000 tons of carbon dioxide, equivalent to planting over 400,000 trees, in more than 30 years. Constructed and financed by Solar Philippines, the Solar Carpark is built atop the mall, providing the structure with a green roof which also shades the parking area. Senator and UN Global Champion Loren Legarda, SM Prime President Hans Sy, SM Engineering Design and Development Vice President Hans Sy, Jr., and Solar Philippines President Leandro Leviste accompanied Gore during the site inspection. READ MORE...

ALSO: Special Report - Millions continue to suffer from climate change


The International Institute for Environment and Development has estimated that more than 634 million people live in low elevation coastal zones and will be severely affected by climate change. The Philippines is among 10 countries (including China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Japan and the United States) with the highest population densities in LECZ. Another study stated that 81 to 90 percent of Filipinos, now numbering about 104 million, are coastal inhabitants who are also among the country’s “poorest of the poor.”  MANILA, Philippines – These days in some parts of the Bicol region, hitherto regarded as the country’s typhoon belt, farmers can hardly predict the shift in wet and dry seasons. In Luzon’s western seaboard, stories of drought abound among those living near Tabtaban Lake in Mindoro Occidental. In 2010, for instance, the area had little rainfall, and the lake dried up.
In northern Mindanao, land tillers in Misamis Oriental now find it difficult to foresee the onset of the dry and wet seasons. Changing weather patterns have been “scrambling” the country’s calendar, particularly in agriculture. Several years ago, when “climate change” was an “abstract” idea for ordinary Filipinos, then University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) chancellor Rex Victor Cruz declared at an international science forum in Los Baños: “Climate change is real, it is serious, it is urgent, and it threatens the security and economy of nations, however large or small, wealthy or poor.” An average of 326 climate-related disasters had been taking place from 2000 to 2004, affecting 262 million people or one in 19 of the world’s population, the United Nations Environment Program-Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery (UNEP-BCPR) reported. The UNEP-BCPR report was cited in a science conference held recently at the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), based in UPLB. Devastating typhoons, particularly Yolanda in 2013, showed that the typhoon belt had shifted from its traditional path (Bicol and northern Luzon, particularly Batanes) to the Visayas and outlying areas, according to the analysis of the Climate Change Commission (CCC). READ MORE...

ALSO: Cebu under state of calamity due to El Niño


Farmer harvests rice in a farm in Talisay town, Cebu. Angel Enriqez, Director of the Department of Agriculture in Central Visayas (DA-7) says no serious effects of the ongoing El Niño or prolonged dry season have yet been seen in farms and livestock in the region, as of this time. ( MB FILE-Juan Carlo de Vela) Farmer harvests rice in a farm in Talisay town, Cebu. ( MB FILE-Juan Carlo de Vela) 
CEBU CITY — The Cebu Provincial Board (PB) has passed a resolution declaring the entire province under a state of calamity, citing damages in the agricultural sector caused by the incessant spell of El Niño.
Cebu PB Member Grecilda Sanchez, who chairs the budget committee and author of the resolution, said the declaration of a state of calamity will hasten the release of aid from the provincial government’s PHP33 million calamity fund for this year which is still untouched. The province, which had a PHP30 million calamity fund last year, also declared a state of calamity last March 27, 2015. Earlier, Cebu City Mayor Michael Rama declared the city under a state of emergency as hinterland barangays were reeling from shortage of water supply. The Cebu PB also approved a resolution authored by PB Member Alex Binghay asking the province to help farmers, especially in the third district’s mountain barangays, cope with water supply problems. Binghay cited the need to prevent an incident similar to what happened in Kidapawan City nearly two weeks ago, when three people were killed while police violently dispersed a farmers’ protest. Binghay said the provincial government “must be cautious and vigilant enough in heeding the demand for relief for farmers from the severe drought that has been gripping Cebu Province since last year.” The Cebu Provincial Rapid Assessment Team is set to consolidate reports from an El Niño assessment team as basis for Cebu Capitol officials to decide how much to give each affected community. Cebu Provincial Agriculturist Roldan Sarajena said some 31,000 Cebu farmers are insured by the Philippine Crop Insurance Corp. (PCIC), with the province paying for their premiums, but no claim has been made so far this year. FULL REPORT

ALSO: El Niño in the Philippines - 8 Things You Should Know


2015 was the hottest year ever recorded according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). This explains all those hot commutes and sweaty commuters you had to suffer through on your way to and from work. But the long-time effects of the increasing temperature are way worse than the daily heat. Places outside Metro Manila, especially areas with sprawling farmlands and water reservoirs are getting the worst of it because of the El Niño. Power plants have started rationing, farmers are losing assets, and some cities’ export percentage are slowly and continually declining. And the El Nino will continue on until the end of the first quarter of 2016. The haze in Indonesia that reached the Philippines, the crazy blizzard in the US and the alarming temperature drop in Thailand and Taiwan—all of these are messages from the Earth telling us to just look up and figure out that all of these people dying and suffering are because of human activity. The Philippines might be next, and here are 8 signs why. So unless you’re Donald Trump who believes that global warming and climate change is a hoax, don’t read on because you’re just going to get pissed. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: El Niño that started in PH last year strongest in modern history
[Less rainfall in PH as tropical cyclones seen altering normal course]


DRY RUN A man walks past a parched ricefield in Cagraray Island in Bacacay, Albay, one of the 32 provinces affected by the dry spell caused by the El Niño phenomenon. PHOTO BY RHAYDZ BARCIA
Less rainfall in PH as tropical cyclones seen altering normal course The El Niño weather phenomenon that began this year could be among the strongest in 65 years, US government scientists said on Thursday. The last El Niño, five years ago, had a major impact: It triggered monsoons in Southeast Asia; droughts in the Philippines, southern Australia and Ecuador; blizzards in the United States; heatwaves in Brazil; and killer floods in Mexico. The Philippine weather bureau Pagasa early this year alerted the public to prepare for the effects of a four-month dry spell that is forecast to affect 32 provinces. “Thirty-two provinces will likely be affected by the dry spell from August to November 2015,” the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said in its second semester outlook. Pagasa identified the provinces as Isabela, Aurora, Batangas, Cavite, Rizal, Quezon, Occidental Mindoro, Oriental Mindoro, Romblon, Albay, Catanduanes, Masbate, Sorsogon, Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Guimaras, Iloilo, Negros Occidental, Bohol, Negros Oriental, Siquijor, Southern Leyte , Zamboanga del Norte, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay, Southern Cotabato, Sarangani, Sultan Kudarat, Basilan, Maguindanao and Sulu. Pagasa expects the dry condition to intensify El Niño from “weak” to “moderate” by August and the weather phenomenon may persist until December then gradually weaken in early 2016. “Such El Niño may likely terminate by May 2016,” it said. El Niño comes with a warming in sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, and can cause unusually heavy rains in some parts of the world and drought elsewhere. This year’s El Niño began in March and is forecast to last about a year. Authorities in Australia have already predicted it would be “strong” and “substantial.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: From CURBED WEATHER - What Do You Need to Know About El Niño? These 10 Things
[
Whether you're in Brooklyn or San Diego, El Niño matters. Here at Curbed Weather Online, we're on the El Niño-beat, ready to bring you coverage on everything from what's flooding to which ski areas will be hit with the best El Niño snow.]


El Niño
IMAGE FROM CNN 
El Niño is happening this winter and it's going to be big. You've probably heard talk of the weather phenomenon set to flood Los Angeles with rain, rescue Lake Tahoe from drought, and provide New England with its mildest winter in years. But besides providing Chris Farley in 1997 with one of his greatest Saturday Night Live skits ever, what do you really know about El Niño? We've broken down the science, gathered the best weather research, and talked to seasoned meteorologists to give you the ultimate insider intel on what to expect this winter across the United States.1. Why is this El Niño so special? This year's El Niño is so strong that some are calling it a "super" El Niño. In fact, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) predicts that there is now over a 90 percent chance that this will be one of the strongest El Niños on record. Since 1950, there have been only two other El Niño winters of this magnitude, one in 1982-1983 and another in 1997-1998. According to CNN, the 1982-1983 El Niño caused more than $8 billion in damage worldwide. The 1997-1998 event caused flooding in the southeast, a severe ice storm in the northeast, $550 million in rain and flood damages in California, and tornadoes in Florida. Overall, the last strong El Niño resulted in $35 billion in damage and 23,000 deaths worldwide. While no two El Niño events are the same, we can compare past events to try to predict what will happen this year. 2. What exactly is El Niño? El Niño occurs when ocean water temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean become warmer than normal. While this may not sound like a big deal, it can have profound impacts on weather patterns around the world and it can create very severe weather in the United States. Some El Niños are strong and some are mild, but all El Niños influence global weather patterns. El Niños occur every 3-5 years but can happen as often as every two years or as rarely as every seven years. Each event usually lasts 9-12 months and peaks in January or February. 3. Is El Niño the same thing as La Niña? Nope. La Niña refers to times when waters in the tropical Pacific are colder than normal. Typically, El Niños occur more frequently than La Niñas. 4. What causes El Niño? No one really knows what triggers an El Niño cycle, but the change in weather pattern is caused by trade winds in eastern Asia. These trade winds weaken and cause warm water to pile up and migrate towards South America. Head over here for a primer on what the equatorial Pacific Ocean looks like under neutral, El Niño, or La Niña conditions. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Al Gore inspects solar project at Mall of Asia


During his visit to the SM Mall of Asia Solar Carpark, former US Vice President Al Gore was accompanied by (left to right) Hans Sy, President of SM Prime; Sen. Loren Legarda, UN Global Champion for Climate and Disaster Resilience; Leandro Leviste, president of Solar Philippines; and Hans Sy Jr., vice president of SM Prime. SM Prime Holdings

MANILA, APRIL 18, 2016 (PHILSTAR) March 23, 2016 - 11:10am - Former US Vice President Al Gore inspected the recently finished SM Mall of Asia (MOA) Solar Carpark during his visit in the country.

Gore was in the country to lead a three-day workshop which educated civic leaders on climate change. He called on Filipinos to end dependence on coal and predicted that the Philippines can become one of the world’s first 100-percent solar-powered economies given its abundant natural solar resource.

He cited the Solar Carpark at MOA during his presentation in terms of how the Philippines is adopting clean energy. The 2.7-MW MOA Solar Carpark is nearly twice the size of the 1.5-MW SM North Edsa Solar Carpark. It is comprised of 10,426 solar panels and 40 inverters, supplying almost 20 percent of the mall’s power needs.

It is expected to offset over 80,000 tons of carbon dioxide, equivalent to planting over 400,000 trees, in more than 30 years.

Constructed and financed by Solar Philippines, the Solar Carpark is built atop the mall, providing the structure with a green roof which also shades the parking area.

Senator and UN Global Champion Loren Legarda, SM Prime President Hans Sy, SM Engineering Design and Development Vice President Hans Sy, Jr., and Solar Philippines President Leandro Leviste accompanied Gore during the site inspection.


PHILSTAR

Special Report: Millions continue to suffer from climate change By Rudy Fernandez (The Philippine Star) | Updated March 24, 2016 - 12:00am 7 27 googleplus2 0


The International Institute for Environment and Development has estimated that more than 634 million people live in low elevation coastal zones and will be severely affected by climate change. The Philippines is among 10 countries (including China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Japan and the United States) with the highest population densities in LECZ. Another study stated that 81 to 90 percent of Filipinos, now numbering about 104 million, are coastal inhabitants who are also among the country’s “poorest of the poor.”

MANILA, Philippines – These days in some parts of the Bicol region, hitherto regarded as the country’s typhoon belt, farmers can hardly predict the shift in wet and dry seasons.

In Luzon’s western seaboard, stories of drought abound among those living near Tabtaban Lake in Mindoro Occidental. In 2010, for instance, the area had little rainfall, and the lake dried up.

In northern Mindanao, land tillers in Misamis Oriental now find it difficult to foresee the onset of the dry and wet seasons.

Changing weather patterns have been “scrambling” the country’s calendar, particularly in agriculture.

Several years ago, when “climate change” was an “abstract” idea for ordinary Filipinos, then University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) chancellor Rex Victor Cruz declared at an international science forum in Los Baños: “Climate change is real, it is serious, it is urgent, and it threatens the security and economy of nations, however large or small, wealthy or poor.”

An average of 326 climate-related disasters had been taking place from 2000 to 2004, affecting 262 million people or one in 19 of the world’s population, the United Nations Environment Program-Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery (UNEP-BCPR) reported.

The UNEP-BCPR report was cited in a science conference held recently at the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), based in UPLB.

Devastating typhoons, particularly Yolanda in 2013, showed that the typhoon belt had shifted from its traditional path (Bicol and northern Luzon, particularly Batanes) to the Visayas and outlying areas, according to the analysis of the Climate Change Commission (CCC).

READ MORE...

The Intergovernment Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) had also concluded that the manifestations of climate change observed over the years pointed to “increasing air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global average sea level,” Cruz said in an international conference held at SEARCA.

Cruz was among the scientists, five of them Filipinos – Jett Villarin, Rosa Perez, Rodel Lasco and Juan Pulhin – who composed the IPCC technical committee. Together with former United States vice president Al Gore Jr., the IPCC won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Gore’s documentary film “An Inconvenient Truth” has generated global interest in the impacts of climate change.

The IPCC was established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to build up and disseminate knowledge about climate change and to lay the foundations for measures needed to counteract climate change.

Several global scientific studies have noted that, among other things, the Philippines’ geographic landscape features stand to be considerably altered in light of rising sea levels triggered by the world’s warming temperatures.

By 2020, the country’s average temperature is projected to increase by one degree Celsius. By 2050, the average temperature will be two degrees more than the current normal: 32 degrees Celsius.

Battle at grassroots Agriculture, which is the most vulnerable to climate change due to its heavy reliance on the weather, “remains to be the backbone of the global economy as it also bears the responsibility of feeding a population that has grown by leaps and bounds while production continues to diminish due to losses in our natural resources,” SEARCA director Gil Saguiguit Jr. said.

He stressed that the battle for climate change “is either won or lost in the grassroots level where localized interventions will play a big role.”

The Los Baños-based International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) has also assessed that for every one degree Celsius increase in temperature, a 15-percent reduction in rice yield follows.

“The impact on rice is simple arithmetic: a three-degree Celsius increase means a 45-percent reduction in rice harvest. That’s a reduction of almost half of what would be available for food,” the CCC said.

Globally, the impact of climate change will be “most disastrous to the semi-arid tropics, home to two billion people and most of the world’s poor,” former agriculture secretary William Dar once said.

Stronger typhoons In the Philippines, while the frequency of typhoons remains the same – about 20 a year – five or six of them are now much stronger, reaching wind speeds of 220 kilometers per hour compared to only two or three in previous years.

“And they bring a lot of rains,” the CCC stated as it cited a Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration projection, based on global computer models, that the rainy season will be up to 60 percent wetter than now and the dry season will be 60 percent dryer.

Other studies have also turned out chilling results for Filipinos.

For instance, the International Institute for Environment and Development has estimated that more than 634 million people live in low elevation coastal zones and will be severely affected by climate change. The Philippines is among 10 countries (including China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Japan and the United States) with the highest population densities in LECZ.

Another study stated that 81 to 90 percent of Filipinos, now numbering about 104 million, are coastal inhabitants who are also among the country’s “poorest of the poor.”

The IPCC has also projected that 90,000 to 140,000 hectares of coastal land will go under water if the sea rises in the coming decades. Another study has warned that if much of the world’s ice caps melt owing to climate change, at least 171 Philippine coastal towns in 10 vulnerable provinces will go under water.


MANILA BULLETIN

Cebu under state of calamity due to El Niño by Philippine News Agency April 12, 2016


Farmer harvests rice in a farm in Talisay town, Cebu. Angel Enriqez, Director of the Department of Agriculture in Central Visayas (DA-7) says no serious effects of the ongoing El Niño or prolonged dry season have yet been seen in farms and livestock in the region, as of this time. ( MB FILE-Juan Carlo de Vela) Farmer harvests rice in a farm in Talisay town, Cebu. ( MB FILE-Juan Carlo de Vela)

CEBU CITY — The Cebu Provincial Board (PB) has passed a resolution declaring the entire province under a state of calamity, citing damages in the agricultural sector caused by the incessant spell of El Niño.

Cebu PB Member Grecilda Sanchez, who chairs the budget committee and author of the resolution, said the declaration of a state of calamity will hasten the release of aid from the provincial government’s PHP33 million calamity fund for this year which is still untouched.

The province, which had a PHP30 million calamity fund last year, also declared a state of calamity last March 27, 2015.


GRAINS. LUCIA ALCONTIN HARVESTS RICE IN AWAYAN, CARCAR CITY, WHILE THE CEBU PROVINCIAL BOARD DECLARES A STATE OF CALAMITY THAT WILL ALLOW THE CAPITOL TO USE ITS P33-MILLION CALAMITY FUNDS TO HELP FARMERS COPE WITH EL NIÑO. FROM PAGADIAN WEBSIITE

Earlier, Cebu City Mayor Michael Rama declared the city under a state of emergency as hinterland barangays were reeling from shortage of water supply.

The Cebu PB also approved a resolution authored by PB Member Alex Binghay asking the province to help farmers, especially in the third district’s mountain barangays, cope with water supply problems.

Binghay cited the need to prevent an incident similar to what happened in Kidapawan City nearly two weeks ago, when three people were killed while police violently dispersed a farmers’ protest.

Binghay said the provincial government “must be cautious and vigilant enough in heeding the demand for relief for farmers from the severe drought that has been gripping Cebu Province since last year.”

The Cebu Provincial Rapid Assessment Team is set to consolidate reports from an El Niño assessment team as basis for Cebu Capitol officials to decide how much to give each affected community.

Cebu Provincial Agriculturist Roldan Sarajena said some 31,000 Cebu farmers are insured by the Philippine Crop Insurance Corp. (PCIC), with the province paying for their premiums, but no claim has been made so far this year.


8LIST-ELNINO.PH

El Niño in the Philippines: 8 Things You Should Know Jan 27, 2016 | 1,006 views By Abu Poblete

2015 was the hottest year ever recorded according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). This explains all those hot commutes and sweaty commuters you had to suffer through on your way to and from work. But the long-time effects of the increasing temperature are way worse than the daily heat.

Places outside Metro Manila, especially areas with sprawling farmlands and water reservoirs are getting the worst of it because of the El Niño.

Power plants have started rationing, farmers are losing assets, and some cities’ export percentage are slowly and continually declining. And the El Nino will continue on until the end of the first quarter of 2016.

The haze in Indonesia that reached the Philippines, the crazy blizzard in the US and the alarming temperature drop in Thailand and Taiwan—all of these are messages from the Earth telling us to just look up and figure out that all of these people dying and suffering are because of human activity.

The Philippines might be next, and here are 8 signs why. So unless you’re Donald Trump who believes that global warming and climate change is a hoax, don’t read on because you’re just going to get pissed.

CONTINUE READING...


Vehicles pile up near the Balintawak toll plaza going to Manila, April 6, 2015, as thousands go back to their normal activities after a long Holy Week break. (Mark Balmores) Via mb.com/ph-

In the capital of the country, the highest recorded temperature reached 36.4 degrees on May 2015 due because of the El Niño phenomenon.

Metro Manila’s commuters will have to suffer through the next three months with the tag team of El Niño’s heat and the stress from the metro’s traffic breakdown.


Via panaynewsphilippines.com

If you think the heat in Manila is bad, think of the people in Zamboanga who had to place their city under a state of calamity at the start of the new year.

With the recommendation of the City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (CDRRMC), the city government was allowed to release calamity funds for the worsening effects of the El Niño.

The CDRRMC sought the need of the declaration because of the affected 587 hectares of farmland and the P10.8 million damage to the city’s agriculture.


Via via greenpeace.org

A member of a Greenpeace expedition team wades through a cornfield badly affected by a severe drought that has hit the Southern Philippines town of Surallah, North Cotabato.

Greenpeace linked rising global temperatures and climate change to the onset of one of the worst droughts to have struck the Philippines, Thailand, and Cambodia in recent memory.

Scientists from NASA recently warned that a weak El Nino combined with the impact of increasing greenhouse gas emissions from the use of fossil fuels such coal could make 2005 the hottest year since global temperature was recorded in the 1800s. Copyright © Greenpeace/Enrique Soriano-Silverlens

North Cotabato was declared in a state of calamity just weeks after Zamboanga. Their records show that about 28,000 hectares of rice and crops amounting to P238 million were damaged because of rat infestation and the drought brought about by the El Niño.

Cloud seeding is the solution the government sees to mitigate the effect of the El Niño, but an initial P4 million is required for this to take effect.

The drought pushed the water level down and caused their local water utility to ration their water for 12 hours.


Via http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UDItcBdfvlI/T0cXjJHWiZI/AAAAAAAAAic/bTERhwNYm0Y/s1600/Lake%2BLanao%2B5.jpg

Just last week, the National Power Corporation (NPC) addressed the low water inflow of Lake Lanao because of the El Niño.

The fast declining water elevation of Lake Lanao pushed the NPC to go into a conservation mode by reducing the outflow and discharge of water from the lake which will consequently reduce the total generation of the Agus hydropower electric plant complex, NPC President and CEO Ma. Gladys Cruz Sta. Rita said.

Also because of the El Niño, Lanao Del Sur suffered from grass fires in Mt. Piagayungan. Luckily, the fire didn’t bring any harm to the community’s residents.


Via gmanews.tv

The city of presidential candidate Rodrigo Duterte has not been spared from the onslaught of the El Niño phenomenon. Just this month, the phenomenon caused the lack of power supply, the shutdown and reduced capacity of hydro power plants, a 39.8% decrease in products for export, and a 7.3% decline in palay and 21.4% in corn (21.4%) production.

El Niño won’t be leaving the country soon, and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) has identified it as a major challenge for the region.

This is why the local government is said to allot P60 million from the their calamity fund for the mitigation of the effects of El Niño to Davao.

We hope to see irrigation facilities, cloud seeding, repair of dams and other rehabilitation projects in the near future.

Even the great Banaue Rice Terraces has reached its limits for years now, and the El Niño isn’t really helping.

The Rice Terraces’ listing as a UNESCO Heritage site is already being threatened by a seven-story parking building planned to be constructed right beside it, a lack of farmers, and giant worms attacking the crops. El Niño drought won’t be helping the site’s survival.


Via http://www.untvweb.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/IMAGE_APR072015_REUTERS_FILE-PHOTO_Cloud-Seeding.jpg

Cloud seeding, rationing of water and electric supply, the release of calamity funds, and even the usage of a drought-resistant rice variety are already underway, but the these temporary solutions are not enough to compensate for the loss of millions of pesos worth of property and produce.


Via cnnphilippines.com

The Davao Light and Power Company (DLPC) is already planning to tap other power sources besides their hydro-power facilities.

They’re eyeing fuel-fed power plants and other power corporations to supply the high power demand of the region.

From the P3 trillion budget this year, President Noynoy Aquino has allotted a total of P19 billion to address the effects of the El Niño to the country.

Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Arsenio M. Balisacan said that many provinces will be threatened by the drought even more when El Niño reaches its peak around March, April and May, He said that they are already programming themselves to expect the worst to happen for a much faster and detailed response.


MANILA TIMES

El Niño strongest in modern history August 14, 2015 10:02 pm


DRY RUN A man walks past a parched ricefield in Cagraray Island in Bacacay, Albay, one of the 32 provinces affected by the dry spell caused by the El Niño phenomenon. PHOTO BY RHAYDZ BARCIA

Less rainfall in PH as tropical cyclones seen altering normal course

The El Niño weather phenomenon that began this year could be among the strongest in 65 years, US government scientists said on Thursday.

The last El Niño, five years ago, had a major impact: It triggered monsoons in Southeast Asia; droughts in the Philippines, southern Australia and Ecuador; blizzards in the United States; heatwaves in Brazil; and killer floods in Mexico.

The Philippine weather bureau Pagasa early this year alerted the public to prepare for the effects of a four-month dry spell that is forecast to affect 32 provinces.

“Thirty-two provinces will likely be affected by the dry spell from August to November 2015,” the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said in its second semester outlook.

Pagasa identified the provinces as Isabela, Aurora, Batangas, Cavite, Rizal, Quezon, Occidental Mindoro, Oriental Mindoro, Romblon, Albay, Catanduanes, Masbate, Sorsogon, Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Guimaras, Iloilo, Negros Occidental, Bohol, Negros Oriental, Siquijor, Southern Leyte , Zamboanga del Norte,

Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay, Southern Cotabato, Sarangani, Sultan Kudarat, Basilan, Maguindanao and Sulu.

Pagasa expects the dry condition to intensify El Niño from “weak” to “moderate” by August and the weather phenomenon may persist until December then gradually weaken in early 2016.

“Such El Niño may likely terminate by May 2016,” it said.

El Niño comes with a warming in sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, and can cause unusually heavy rains in some parts of the world and drought elsewhere.

This year’s El Niño began in March and is forecast to last about a year.

Authorities in Australia have already predicted it would be “strong” and “substantial.”

READ MORE...

That trend is still expected to continue, said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center, on a conference call with reporters to discuss the US agency’s latest forecast, released also on Thursday.



“What is new this month is we are predicting that this El Niño could be among the strongest El Niños in the historical record dating back to 1950,” Halpert said.

The reason for the forecast is the finding that three months of average sea surface temperatures in a key part of the equatorial Pacific “could potentially reach or even exceed two degrees Celsius above normal, which is 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, a value that we have only recorded three times in the last 65 years,” he added.

Such temperatures were previously seen in the 1972-1973 season, 1982-1983 and 1997-1998.

The southern United States from Florida to central California may expect higher than normal levels of precipitation, as can the US East Coast as far north as New England, Halpert said.

The northern Rockies, Great Lakes, Hawaii and western Alaska may be dryer and warmer than normal, he added.

Even though forecasts of rain will be welcome in drought-ravaged California, Halpert said it would not be enough to refill the state’s reservoirs.

“One season of above average rain and snow is very unlikely to erase four years of drought,” he added.

Altered storm patterns in PH

Despite the prevailing El Niño, Pagasa expects an average 11 to 16 tropical cyclones to either enter or develop in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) during the June to December period.

Pagasa earlier said El Niño episodes could alter the landfall patterns of tropical cyclones.

Pagasa forecaster Fernando Cada had said lower-than-average number of landfalls could be expected in the Philippines during El Niño as tropical cyclones tend to head northward instead of crossing the country as what storms generally do under normal conditions.

He explained that lesser landfalls mean less amount of rainfall as the country would experience during a non-El Niño year.

The recent cyclone to hit the country, Hanna (international name: Soudelor), which was classified as a Category V super typhoon and dubbed as the strongest storm this year, only scraped the northeastern part of the Philippine Area of Responsibility and did not make landfall.

Soudelor, however, had severe impacts in the Northern Mariana Islands, Taiwan and eastern China, resulting in at least 37 confirmed fatalities.

Pagasa is monitoring a weather disturbance that may develop into a super typhoon which like Hanna or Soudelor is not expected to make landfall.
The state weather bureau said the storm is forecast to head straight to Japan if it continues to follow its current path.

The cyclone, which is expected to enhance the southwest monsoon (habagat), may enter the PAR by middle of next week.
WITH AFP


CURBED WEATHER ONLINE

What Do You Need to Know About El Niño? These 10 Things BY MEGAN BARBER @MEGCBARBER NOV 11, 2015, 8:22A


El Niño IMAGE FROM CNN

An El Nino-powered storm pounds the pilings of ocean front homes on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, Calif., in this Dec. 5, 1997, file photo. AP / Reed Saxon
El Niño is happening this winter and it's going to be big. You've probably heard talk of the weather phenomenon set to flood Los Angeles with rain, rescue Lake Tahoe from drought, and provide New England with its mildest winter in years. But besides providing Chris Farley in 1997 with one of his greatest Saturday Night Live skits ever, what do you really know about El Niño? We've broken down the science, gathered the best weather research, and talked to seasoned meteorologists to give you the ultimate insider intel on what to expect this winter across the United States.

1. Why is this El Niño so special?

This year's El Niño is so strong that some are calling it a "super" El Niño. In fact, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) predicts that there is now over a 90 percent chance that this will be one of the strongest El Niños on record. Since 1950, there have been only two other El Niño winters of this magnitude, one in 1982-1983 and another in 1997-1998. According to CNN, the 1982-1983 El Niño caused more than $8 billion in damage worldwide. The 1997-1998 event caused flooding in the southeast, a severe ice storm in the northeast, $550 million in rain and flood damages in California, and tornadoes in Florida. Overall, the last strong El Niño resulted in $35 billion in damage and 23,000 deaths worldwide. While no two El Niño events are the same, we can compare past events to try to predict what will happen this year.

2. What exactly is El Niño?

El Niño occurs when ocean water temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean become warmer than normal. While this may not sound like a big deal, it can have profound impacts on weather patterns around the world and it can create very severe weather in the United States. Some El Niños are strong and some are mild, but all El Niños influence global weather patterns. El Niños occur every 3-5 years but can happen as often as every two years or as rarely as every seven years. Each event usually lasts 9-12 months and peaks in January or February.

3. Is El Niño the same thing as La Niña?

Nope. La Niña refers to times when waters in the tropical Pacific are colder than normal. Typically, El Niños occur more frequently than La Niñas.

4. What causes El Niño?

No one really knows what triggers an El Niño cycle, but the change in weather pattern is caused by trade winds in eastern Asia. These trade winds weaken and cause warm water to pile up and migrate towards South America. Head over here for a primer on what the equatorial Pacific Ocean looks like under neutral, El Niño, or La Niña conditions.

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5. What does El Niño mean for temperatures this winter?

According to NOAA, this year's El Niño will likely bring warmer temperatures to the northern half of North America and colder temperatures to the southern half. That means that it's unlikely that Boston will see a repeat of last year's never ending winter.

6. What does El Niño mean for precipitation this winter?

The northern half of North America will see less precipitation this winter, especially Idaho, Montana, and the midwest. The southern half of the United States should see more precipitation. Historically, El Niño winters have meant less snow in the Northeast.

7. Can El Niño pull California out of the drought?

No, but it can help. Because California has been in the midst of an epic four-year drought, everyone wants to know if El Niño is the solution. And while a wetter-than-normal winter would certainly help California's water supply, the state's drought problem can't be solved in just one winter. It will take multiple years of above average or average precipitation to make a dent. It also matters where El Niño's biggest storms hit. The backbone of California's water supply, delivery system, and reservoir capacity is in Northern California. If El Niño storms deliver more water to Southern California, it won't be as helpful to the drought. But if heavy rain falls north of Sacramento, where some of the state's largest reservoirs are located, the El Niño precipitation would be much more helpful. Best case scenario? The entire state sees substantial rainfall and enough snowfall to replenish both California's reservoirs and its high-altitude snow fields.

It's also important to note that El Niño is not the only factor that influences global weather patterns. Last year there was a weak El Niño in place for much of the winter but warm water in the northeast Pacific Ocean (also known as the Blob), had a much stronger influence on snowfall amounts. While last year's high pressure ridge seems to have broken down, we won't really see the strongest effects of El Niño in California until December or January.

8. Does El Niño only matter to California?

No. The El Niño weather pattern influences the entire country, just in different ways. While people in Los Angeles and San Francisco could see record rainfall and flooding, people in Chicago and Detroit can expect a milder winter. Likewise, New York City could see a major El Niño ice storm, while Miami might face severe thunderstorms and high winds. With an El Niño this strong, extreme weather is highly likely.

9. Will this El Niño cause weather-related damage?

Yes, it's possible. Because El Niño often brings severe weather — flooding, ice storms, blizzards, and even tornadoes — there's a good chance that this year's strong El Niño will cause damage. In anticipation of severe storms, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has established an El Niño-specific website. The good news is that you can make some preparations in advance. In Los Angeles, homeowners are rushing to fix their roofs before the El Niño rains, overwhelming the roofing industry. The Los Angeles Times even has a list of 28 things to do to prepare for El Niño.

10. Is there anything good about El Niño?

Despite the risk of floods and severe weather overall, El Niño isn't all bad. During strong El Niño years, hurricanes in the Atlantic are often suppressed and warmer temperatures in Northeastern North America can help ensure that cities like New York or Chicago aren't buried under record-breaking amounts of snow. El Niño can also be a boon to ski areas (depending on where they are).

Overall:

Whether you're in Brooklyn or San Diego, El Niño matters. Here at Curbed, we're on the El Niño-beat, ready to bring you coverage on everything from what's flooding to which ski areas will be hit with the best El Niño snow. We'll also tackle helpful stories like how to sell your house in an El Niño year and bring you top-notch photos of the most extreme weather. Have a tip or an El Niño story idea? Send them our way. Stay safe out there; winter is coming.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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