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DAVID BOWIE, CONSTELLATION, OUTER SPACE, ZIGGY STARDUST


Original Space Oddity: David Bowie Might Get His Own Constellation (Photo : Piano Piano! | Flickr) - Aladdin Sane, The iconic 'Space Oddity' glam rocker might have a constellation to call his own, if an observatory and a radio station in Belgium get their way. The iconic "Space Oddity" glam rocker David Bowie might someday soon have a constellation to call his own. The MIRA Public Observatory, located in Belgium, teamed up with Studio Brussels, a local radio station, to pay a lasting, fitting tribute to the cultural icon by registering for a brand-new constellation to memorialize the musician. According to the designs released by both MIRA and Studio Brussels, the Bowie-themed constellation is comprised of seven different stars and fashioned in the shape of the same face-painted lightning bolt that the rock star donned on the cover of his album "Aladdin Sane."  "Referring to his various albums, we chose seven stars ó Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and the Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis ó in the vicinity of Mars," said MIRA scientist Philippe Mollet, pointing out the numerous Bowie references in the designation ó most pointedly its Mars-centric location, which colludes with the androgynous Bowie persona Ziggy Stardust, who came from the Red Planet. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: BELGIANS GIVE ĎSTARMANí BOWIE OWN CONSTELLATION


Carl Court, Getty Images Music legend David Bowie gets his own constellation, delineated by seven stars that shine in the iconic shape of a lightning bolt. A remarkable tribute by Belgian music station Studio Brussel and MIRA Public Observatory.
During his long career, David Bowie knew some great loves. One of his greatest inspiration was undoubtedly: the universe. Bowie had a special fondness for everything that had to do with the universe. Ziggy Stardust, the album that was both commercially and artistically one of his greatest achievements, characterized him even as an extra-terrestrial rock star. Constellation Studio Brussels wanted to give David Bowie a fitting tribute: an own constellation. Along with public observatory MIRA, Studio Brussel registered seven stars in the form of Bowieís iconic thunderbolt. Bowie takes on a symbolic place alongside the 88 existing constellations. "It was not easy to identify the appropriate stars," says Philippe Mollet from MIRA. "Studio Brussels asked us to give Bowie a unique place in the galaxy. Referring to his various albums, we chose seven stars - Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and the Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis - in the vicinity of Mars at the exact time of his death. The constellation looks like an exact copy of the iconic Bowie lightning. "  READ MORE...

ALSO: Astronaut Chris Hadfield's 'Space Oddity' Cover - Remains A Poignant David Bowie Tribute After The Rock Star's Death


Mourn the loss of rocker David Bowie with former NASA astronaut Chris Hadfield's cover of his 1969 single 'Space Oddity,' filmed on the International Space Station in 2013. (Photo : YouTube) With the world mourning the loss of glam rocker David Bowie, one of the most influential musicians and performers of the 20th century, a bright star remains in one astronaut's viral video tribute to the original Space Oddity: a cover of one of his songs filmed in actual space. Floating in anti-gravity with guitar in hand, former NASA astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield recorded a tribute to Bowie's 1969 single "Space Oddity" while serving on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2013. The three-year-old video, meant to be the 56-year-old astronaut's swan-song for his last mission, garnered millions of hits (the current count is more than 27 million views). The cover won praise from even Bowie himself, who said that Hadfield's version of the song was "possibly the most poignant version of the song ever created."  The video has seen a resurgence in popularity with the passing of Bowie at the age of 69 after his battle with cancer on Sunday, Jan. 10. WATCH THE VIDEO 'SPACE ODDITY'...

ALSO: Remembering David Bowie's singular film career


The late rock star's untouchable on-screen legacy of wizards, aliens, and vampires
In Nagisa ‘shima's 1983 British / Japanese co-production Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, there's a striking scene in which David Bowie, playing a prisoner of war in a World War II Japanese camp, saves the life of one of his fellow captives. The camp's young Japanese commander is about to execute him in front of the entire camp when Bowie breaks ranks, stalks through the crowd of prisoners, and kisses the commander delicately on both cheeks.
For the commander, it's an unbearable moment of internal conflict, bringing his admiration for (and attraction to) Bowie's character into humiliatingly public conflict with his honor. For Bowie himself, it was just another chance to cut through the crowd. The scene draws on all his cool, alien dignity, making him a still focal point amid chaos. Even in the same army fatigues as everyone around him, he doesn't seem like part of the scene until he chooses to engage with it. A moment later, the calm breaks as he's dragged to the ground and beaten. But for a moment, he seems entirely alien, like he's condescending to be in the world for a moment just to get a job done. A CHILLY OUTSIDER WITH A WARM, PASSIONATE HEART That sense of otherworldly remove was why filmmakers turned to David Bowie over and over throughout a career that was primarily focused on music, but had its share of memorable screen roles as well. Bowie, dead at 69 after an until now private fight against cancer, leaves behind a series of indelible cinematic performances that were almost always about being a chilly outsider with a warm, passionate heart. Directors drew on his legend as a gawky, glam stage performer, but they also consistently burnished it. His movie performances emphasized his outsider status, but they also made it into an invitation and a welcome: "This could never be you, but you can come bask in it."   READ MORE...

RELATED: DAVID BOWIE's 'BLACKSTAR' ALBUM VIDEO WITH LYRICS...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

David Bowie, Constellation, Outer Space, Ziggy Stardust


Original Space Oddity: David Bowie Might Get His Own Constellation
(Photo : Piano Piano! | Flickr)

MANILA, JANUARY 25, 2016 (TECHTIMES ONLINE) By J.E. Reich, Tech Times | January 18, 3:19  - Aladdin Sane, The iconic 'Space Oddity' glam rocker might have a constellation to call his own, if an observatory and a radio station in Belgium get their way.

The iconic "Space Oddity" glam rocker David Bowie might someday soon have a constellation to call his own.

The MIRA Public Observatory, located in Belgium, teamed up with Studio Brussels, a local radio station, to pay a lasting, fitting tribute to the cultural icon by registering for a brand-new constellation to memorialize the musician.

According to the designs released by both MIRA and Studio Brussels, the Bowie-themed constellation is comprised of seven different stars and fashioned in the shape of the same face-painted lightning bolt that the rock star donned on the cover of his album "Aladdin Sane."

"Referring to his various albums, we chose seven stars ó Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and the Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis ó in the vicinity of Mars," said MIRA scientist Philippe Mollet, pointing out the numerous Bowie references in the designation ó most pointedly its Mars-centric location, which colludes with the androgynous Bowie persona Ziggy Stardust, who came from the Red Planet.

CONTINUE READING...

Bowie Constellation


(Photo : Studio Brussels)

In the case of the constellation, the precise picks for the constellation-composing stars have an additional meaning: all of them were "in the vicinity of Mars at the exact time of [Bowie's] death," added Mollet.
Via: Slashgear Photo: Piano Piano! | Flickr


DDBBRUSSELS.PRESLEY.COM

BELGIANS GIVE ĎSTARMANí BOWIE OWN CONSTELLATION Kenn Van Lijsebeth
Wednesday, January 13, 2016 ó


Carl Court, Getty Images

Music legend David Bowie gets his own constellation, delineated by seven stars that shine in the iconic shape of a lightning bolt. A remarkable tribute by Belgian music station Studio Brussel and MIRA Public Observatory.

During his long career, David Bowie knew some great loves. One of his greatest inspiration was undoubtedly: the universe. Bowie had a special fondness for everything that had to do with the universe. Ziggy Stardust, the album that was both commercially and artistically one of his greatest achievements, characterized him even as an extra-terrestrial rock star.

Constellation

Studio Brussels wanted to give David Bowie a fitting tribute: an own constellation.

Along with public observatory MIRA, Studio Brussel registered seven stars in the form of Bowieís iconic thunderbolt.

Bowie takes on a symbolic place alongside the 88 existing constellations. "It was not easy to identify the appropriate stars," says Philippe Mollet from MIRA. "Studio Brussels asked us to give Bowie a unique place in the galaxy. Referring to his various albums, we chose seven stars - Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and the Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis - in the vicinity of Mars at the exact time of his death. The constellation looks like an exact copy of the iconic Bowie lightning. "

READ MORE...

Add your own stardust far

The homage to the 'Starman' is linked to an online action "Stardust for Bowie" developed on Google Sky. Listeners and fans of Bowie can create a personal tribute in the Bowie constellation on www.stardustforbowie.be .

Each visitor may assign a favourite song and leave a short personal text in the shape of a star.






stardustforbowie.be

About DDB Brussels
To solve our clientís business issues, we favor our peopleís skills instead of the latest buzzwords. Bringing together our peopleís talent in strategy, technology, creation and production under one roof results in "work that worksĒ.

Our long-standing experience with people-focused brands (VW, IKEA, McDonaldís, bpost bankÖ) inspires an internal culture based on creativity & humanity. This helps us come up with creative business solutions that interact with how people behave today. Our solutions go beyond what is traditionally labeled as advertising and can propel a brand for years.

With a headcount of around 50 people, we are large enough to take up the most serious challenges, while remaining agile enough to respond in real-time to new opportunities.


TECHTIMES.COM

Astronaut Chris Hadfield's 'Space Oddity' Cover Remains A Poignant David Bowie Tribute After The Rock Star's Death By J.E. Reich, Tech Times | January 11, 5:13  PM Like Follow Share Tweet Reddit0 CommentsSUBSCRIBE


Mourn the loss of rocker David Bowie with former NASA astronaut Chris Hadfield's cover of his 1969 single 'Space Oddity,' filmed on the International Space Station in 2013. (Photo : YouTube)

With the world mourning the loss of glam rocker David Bowie, one of the most influential musicians and performers of the 20th century, a bright star remains in one astronaut's viral video tribute to the original Space Oddity: a cover of one of his songs filmed in actual space.

Floating in anti-gravity with guitar in hand, former NASA astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield recorded a tribute to Bowie's 1969 single "Space Oddity" while serving on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2013. The three-year-old video, meant to be the 56-year-old astronaut's swan-song for his last mission, garnered millions of hits (the current count is more than 27 million views).

The cover won praise from even Bowie himself, who said that Hadfield's version of the song was "possibly the most poignant version of the song ever created."

The video has seen a resurgence in popularity with the passing of Bowie at the age of 69 after his battle with cancer on Sunday, Jan. 10.

Check out Chris Hadfield's Bowie tribute in the video clip below.

 

READ CHRIS' TWEETS FROM SPACE (LINK)


TWEET Chris HadfieldVerified account @Cmdr_Hadfield Canadian Astronaut, back on Earth after living aboard ISS as Commander of Expedition 35. For events and media, please write to requests@chrishadfield.ca .

@ https://twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield


Remembering David Bowie's singular film career By Tasha Robinson on January 11, 2016 01:45 pm Share on Facebook (2,441) Tweet Share Pin (3)


The late rock star's untouchable on-screen legacy of wizards, aliens, and vampires
In Nagisa ‘shima's 1983 British / Japanese co-production Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, there's a striking scene in which David Bowie, playing a prisoner of war in a World War II Japanese camp, saves the life of one of his fellow captives. The camp's young Japanese commander is about to execute him in front of the entire camp when Bowie breaks ranks, stalks through the crowd of prisoners, and kisses the commander delicately on both cheeks.

For the commander, it's an unbearable moment of internal conflict, bringing his admiration for (and attraction to) Bowie's character into humiliatingly public conflict with his honor. For Bowie himself, it was just another chance to cut through the crowd.

 The scene draws on all his cool, alien dignity, making him a still focal point amid chaos. Even in the same army fatigues as everyone around him, he doesn't seem like part of the scene until he chooses to engage with it. A moment later, the calm breaks as he's dragged to the ground and beaten. But for a moment, he seems entirely alien, like he's condescending to be in the world for a moment just to get a job done.

A CHILLY OUTSIDER WITH A WARM, PASSIONATE HEART

That sense of otherworldly remove was why filmmakers turned to David Bowie over and over throughout a career that was primarily focused on music, but had its share of memorable screen roles as well. Bowie, dead at 69 after an until now private fight against cancer, leaves behind a series of indelible cinematic performances that were almost always about being a chilly outsider with a warm, passionate heart.

Directors drew on his legend as a gawky, glam stage performer, but they also consistently burnished it. His movie performances emphasized his outsider status, but they also made it into an invitation and a welcome: "This could never be you, but you can come bask in it." 

READ MORE...

No role typified that alienness like the one that made him an actual alien: Nicolas Roeg's surreal 1976 science fiction drama The Man Who Fell To Earth. The film stars Bowie as an extraterrestrial trying to get water back to his drought-stricken home planet, where his wife and children are dying. But the process of becoming a rich mogul capable of building a water-transporting spaceship pushes Bowie's character away from his goals.

And when he's captured and held by the government, he becomes even more dissociated from his intentions, falling into a sybaritic haze of alcohol, sex, and self-absorption. In the role, Bowie embodies the idea of alienation and makes it both literal and figurative ó behind the scenes, Bowie confirmed in multiple interviews that he was in a haze of cocaine abuse during the shoot, barely aware of what was happening.

But perhaps by sheer force of personality, it becomes a film about self-indulgence, rock star wealth, and separation from humanity that feels strikingly like a metaphorical Bowie biography. The role couldn't exist without Bowie's status as an outsider, and the conscious combination of melancholy and defiance that fed his music.

Other Bowie characters tapped into a similar sort of otherness. His supporting roles drew on his striking, unusual looks as well as his fame: as Nikola Tesla in Christopher Nolan's 2006 film The Prestige, he represents a world of technology so advanced, it literally appears to be magic.

While the other characters compete for the greatest stage effect of all time, he already has the answers, and only seems to be gently condescending to participate in the film's passionate rivalry. As Pontius Pilate in Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation Of Christ, he's a savvy but quiet Roman politician in a Jewish land, removed from the political upheaval Jesus Christ is causing, but capable of surveying it with a weary eye.

In Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, he's just part and parcel of David Lynch's endlessly dreamlike imagery: speaking in coded spy language with a no-nonsense seriousness, he's not quite aware that he's accidentally shifted dimensions, into a place where his veiled references don't make sense.

HE COULD SEND UP HIS OWN IMAGE AND REMAIN COOL

Occasionally he got to have fun with his own image ó playing himself as the ultimate arbiter of an impromptu male-model walk-off in Zoolander, or as the deliverer of beneficent blessings in Bandslam. His role as Andy Warhol in Basquiat was almost a winking self-portrait of a strange artist with a fey manner and strong visions of what art should be.

On the small screen, his cameo in Ricky Gervais' Extras, where he spontaneously composes a brutal but insanely catchy ditty insulting Gervais' character for his appearance and his fears of selling out, remains one of the all-time highlights of a show that had plenty of them.

 

But two roles particularly stand out in Bowie's collection of cold-patrician-oddball performances. In Jim Henson's Labyrinth, he's a pansexual glam goblin, simultaneously mesmerizing and terrifying to a teenage girl who's apparently cobbled him up out of her wildest early sexual fantasies. The role underlines how rarely he got to cross-pollinate his careers: his acting roles almost never take advantage of his musical performance skills.

Labyrinth lets him play menace, warmth, and arch humor, but it also lets him bring his famous theatrical musical style to a character designed to showcase his unusual looks and cruel, above-it-all image. He's an adult "love injection" (as one of the film's songs puts it) in a fantasy that's hovering precariously between childhood toys and raw teenage lust. He represents a purely internal sexual fantasy, an awakening for young girls for whom actual boys still aren't as real, or as appealing, as what goes on in their heads.

And in The Hunger, as the gradually decomposing plaything of a blood-drinking monster, he's an entirely different kind of fantasy: a 400-year-old vampire's mate who starts out representing sex and rapacious consumption of life, and winds up representing decay and death. For once, he isn't the object of helpless lust, he's the victim ó but he's still the outsider, removed from humanity, and with no interest in rejoining it when he could have inhumanity instead.

Filmmakers called in David Bowie when they needed someone on a distinctly different plane, sometimes reveling in his distance, sometimes struggling to overcome it. He was a fantasy so pristine and ultimate, he could send up his own image and still remain cool.

There are modern analogues ó Tilda Swinton on the screen, Lady Gaga on the stage ó but no one quite like Bowie for simple alien splendor. In an age where virtually all the aliens and elves are CGI, he might have seem outmoded. But there's nothing quite like the glamour he brought to the screen. He was the rarest thing in Hollywood: a unique, irreplaceable persona, with a face and a history to match.

-------------------------

DAVID BOWIE'S 'BLACKSTAR'

 
David Bowie - Blackstar - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kszLwBaC4Sw
Artist: David Bowie Album: Blackstar Released: 2016

DAVID BOWIE LYRICS
		
"Blackstar"
In the villa of Ormen, in the villa of Ormen
Stands a solitary candle, ah-ah, ah-ah
In the centre of it all, in the centre of it all
Your eyes
​
On the day of execution, on the day of execution
Only women kneel and smile, ah-ah, ah-ah
At the centre of it all, at the centre of it all
Your eyes, your eyes
​
Ah-ah-ah
Ah-ah-ah
​
In the villa of Ormen, in the villa of Ormen
Stands a solitary candle, ah-ah, ah-ah
In the centre of it all, in the centre of it all
Your eyes
Ah-ah-ah
​
Something happened on the day he died
Spirit rose a metre and stepped aside
Somebody else took his place, and bravely cried
(Iím a blackstar, Iím a blackstar)
​
How many times does an angel fall?
How many people lie instead of talking tall?
He trod on sacred ground, he cried loud into the crowd
(Iím a blackstar, Iím a blackstar, Iím not a gangster)
​
I canít answer why (Iím a blackstar)
Just go with me (Iím not a filmstar)
Iím-a take you home (Iím a blackstar)
Take your passport and shoes (Iím not a popstar)
And your sedatives, boo (Iím a blackstar)
Youíre a flash in the pan (Iím not a marvel star)
Iím the great I am (Iím a blackstar)
​
Iím a blackstar, way up, oh honey, Iíve got game
I see right so white, so open-heart itís pain
I want eagles in my daydreams, diamonds in my eyes
(Iím a blackstar, Iím a blackstar)
​
Something happened on the day he died
Spirit rose a metre and stepped aside
Somebody else took his place, and bravely cried
(Iím a blackstar, Iím a star star, Iím a blackstar)
​
I canít answer why (Iím not a gangster)
But I can tell you how (Iím not a flam star)
We were born upside-down (Iím a star star)
Born the wrong way Ďround (Iím not a white star)
(Iím a blackstar, Iím not a gangster
Iím a blackstar, Iím a blackstar
Iím not a pornstar, Iím not a wandering star
Iím a blackstar, Iím a blackstar)
​
In the villa of Ormen stands a solitary candle
Ah-ah, ah-ah
At the centre of it all, your eyes
On the day of execution, only women kneel and smile
Ah-ah, ah-ah
At the centre of it all, your eyes, your eyes
Ah-ah-ah SOURCE GOOGLE VIDEOS

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