© Copyright, 2015 (PHNO)
 http://newsflash.org | NOVEMBER 18 -19, 2015

PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

FOR A HAPPIER LIFE, GIVE UP FACEBOOK - STUDY


NOVEMBER 11 -People who go a week without using Facebook feel happier than others, a study says Always envious? Got a non-existent social life and struggle to concentrate? All this might be down to Facebook, if you believe a study showing those who go a week without using the social network feel happier than others. Carried out by the Happiness Research Institute (HRI), the study involved a sample of 1,095 people in Denmark who were divided into two groups, half of whom continued using Facebook while the others stopped.“We focused on Facebook because it is the social media that most people use across age groups,” Meik Wiking, HRI’s chief executive, said. After a week, those people who had not been on Facebook said they were more satisfied with their lives, with 88 percent of them describing themselves as “happy” compared with 81 percent from the second group. READ MORE...

ALSO: Facebook opens first Africa office


JUNE 29 -Facebook said more than 80 percent of people in African access the social network from their mobile phones
Facebook announced Monday it had opened its first African office in Johannesburg as part of its efforts "to help people and businesses connect" on the continent.
The office will be headed by Nunu Ntshingila, a former executive at the advertising agency Ogilvy. "This office will support the significant growth in businesses and people using Facebook," said a statement from the world's biggest social network, which has some 1.4 billion active users worldwide including 120 million in Africa. "We are inspired by the incredible ways people and businesses in Africa use Facebook to connect," said Nicola Mendelsohn, regional vice president for Facebook. "Africa is important to Facebook, and this office is a key part of our strategy to expand our investment and presence across (the region). Facebook is already a central part of people's lives in Africa, and with more than a billion people in Africa, we want to do more to help people and businesses connect." READ MORE...

ALSO: Facebook touts advertising milestone


FLASHBACK 2013 -Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network
The world's biggest social network now has more than 1.1 billion users Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network.Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network
"I know business owners like these invest their hard-earned money and time into running their companies," Facebook's Dan Levy said in a blog post that referred to advertisers such as Singapore's Retail Ministry and retailer Springwools in Ireland. "So today, on behalf of everyone at Facebook, I want to say 'thank you' to them and to the over one million businesses like them who are active advertisers." A little more than a year after a nightmarish share offering, Facebook still has its ardent backers and detractors. The world's biggest social network, which now has more than 1.1 billion users, has managed to boost its earnings since the initial public offering, including from its mobile platform, important in countering its critics. The IPO on May 18 last year sparked a series of crises for Facebook, with the shares plunging from $38 to as low as $17.73 in September. Shares closed Tuesday at $24.21. In the past year, California-based Facebook has ramped up its advertising efforts, especially for the mobile market. READ MORE...

ALSO: Introverts Love Facebook and Extroverts Hate It. Here’s Why.


JUNE 19, 2015 -Do you love Facebook? Do you enjoy getting a glimpse into the daily lives of your family and friends? If you do, there’s an excellent chance that you’re an introvert. If you hate Facebook, you could be an extrovert. Everything about Facebook serves the emotional and psychological needs of introverts. It gives them a place to socialize and chat with people they like, without having to deal with the elements of in-person dialogues that make them uncomfortable. It allows them to say their piece, without being interrupted, scowled at, or patronized. Extroverts, on the other hand, often despise everything about Facebook. The facial cues, the back-and-forth banter and the physical contact are all missing. In fact, it’s often the extrovert who expounds upon the tragedy that social networks and smartphones are causing to society and interpersonal relationships. It’s time to take a stand for all of you introverts who love Facebook as much as I do. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO New study: Facebook and Twitter threat to marriages; Social media now a factor in one in seven divorces


APRIL 29, 2015 -New research found one in seven married individuals have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings on social media sites. Nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of social media Facebook and Twitter have become a significant threat to marriage – with social media now a factor in an increasing number of divorce cases, say lawyers. One in seven married individuals have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online sites, according to research. A similar proportion admit that they search online for evidence of their partner’s infidelity, while nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of the way their husband or wife uses social media. One in seven people surveyed say they have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online social media sites, according to new research One in seven people surveyed say they have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online social media sites, according to new research The research was commissioned by law firm Slater and Gordon in response to an increase in the number of its clients who said that Facebook, Skype, Snapchat, Twitter, What’sApp or other social media sites had played a part in their divorce. Andrew Newbury, of Slater and Gordon, said: ‘Five years ago Facebook was rarely mentioned in the context of a marriage ending, but now it has become commonplace.
‘Social media is the new marriage minefield. Social media, specifically pictures and posts on Facebook, are now being routinely raised in divorces.’READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

For a happier life, give up Facebook – study


People who go a week without using Facebook feel happier than others, a study says

MANILA, NOVEMBER 16, 2015 (MANILA TIMES) November 11, 2015 - Always envious? Got a non-existent social life and struggle to concentrate?

All this might be down to Facebook, if you believe a study showing those who go a week without using the social network feel happier than others.

Carried out by the Happiness Research Institute (HRI), the study involved a sample of 1,095 people in Denmark who were divided into two groups, half of whom continued using Facebook while the others stopped.

“We focused on Facebook because it is the social media that most people use across age groups,” Meik Wiking, HRI’s chief executive, said.

After a week, those people who had not been on Facebook said they were more satisfied with their lives, with 88 percent of them describing themselves as “happy” compared with 81 percent from the second group.

READ MORE...

Some 84 percent said they appreciated their lives compared with 75 percent in the other group, and only 12 percent described themselves as dissatisfied, compared with 20 percent among those who continued using Facebook.

At the end of the experiment, the abstainers reported having a richer social life and fewer difficulties in concentrating, while the others reported no such change.

“Instead of focusing on what we actually need, we have an unfortunate tendency to focus on what other people have,” the authors of the study wrote.

In other words, Facebook users are 39 percent more likely to feel less happy than non-users. AFP


PHYS.ORG/NEWS

Facebook opens first Africa office June 29, 2015


Facebook said more than 80 percent of people in African access the social network from their mobile phones

Facebook said more than 80 percent of people in African access the social network from their mobile phones Facebook announced Monday it had opened its first African office in Johannesburg as part of its efforts "to help people and businesses connect" on the continent.

The office will be headed by Nunu Ntshingila, a former executive at the advertising agency Ogilvy. "This office will support the significant growth in businesses and people using Facebook," said a statement from the world's biggest social network, which has some 1.4 billion active users worldwide including 120 million in Africa.

"We are inspired by the incredible ways people and businesses in Africa use Facebook to connect," said Nicola Mendelsohn, regional vice president for Facebook.

"Africa is important to Facebook, and this office is a key part of our strategy to expand our investment and presence across (the region). Facebook is already a central part of people's lives in Africa, and with more than a billion people in Africa, we want to do more to help people and businesses connect."

READ MORE...

Facebook said more than 80 percent of people in African access the social network from their mobile phones.

"Mobile is not a trend; it's the fastest development in communications we've ever seen," Mendelsohn said.

"This couldn't be more true in Africa—where so many people are mobile-only. This new office is a significant milestone for Facebook and our teams want to partner with businesses across the continent."

Facebook will initially focus on in sub-Saharan countries including Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa and will also offer support for Senegal, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda, Zambia, Mozambique and Ethiopia.

"Facebook will partner with governments, telecom operators, agencies and other stakeholders to deliver localized solutions to advertisers and users continent-wide," the statement said.


PHYS.ORG/NEWS (FLASHBACK 2013)

Facebook touts advertising milestone June 19, 2013


Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network

The world's biggest social network now has more than 1.1 billion users Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network.

Facebook said Tuesday that more than a million businesses now advertise at the leading social network

"I know business owners like these invest their hard-earned money and time into running their companies," Facebook's Dan Levy said in a blog post that referred to advertisers such as Singapore's Retail Ministry and retailer Springwools in Ireland.

"So today, on behalf of everyone at Facebook, I want to say 'thank you' to them and to the over one million businesses like them who are active advertisers."

A little more than a year after a nightmarish share offering, Facebook still has its ardent backers and detractors.

The world's biggest social network, which now has more than 1.1 billion users, has managed to boost its earnings since the initial public offering, including from its mobile platform, important in countering its critics.

The IPO on May 18 last year sparked a series of crises for Facebook, with the shares plunging from $38 to as low as $17.73 in September.

Shares closed Tuesday at $24.21. In the past year, California-based Facebook has ramped up its advertising efforts, especially for the mobile market.


MAKEUSEOF.COM

Introverts Love Facebook and Extroverts Hate It. Here’s Why. Written by Ryan Dube March 20, 2015

Do you love Facebook? Do you enjoy getting a glimpse into the daily lives of your family and friends? If you do, there’s an excellent chance that you’re an introvert. If you hate Facebook, you could be an extrovert.

Everything about Facebook serves the emotional and psychological needs of introverts. It gives them a place to socialize and chat with people they like, without having to deal with the elements of in-person dialogues that make them uncomfortable. It allows them to say their piece, without being interrupted, scowled at, or patronized.

Extroverts, on the other hand, often despise everything about Facebook. The facial cues, the back-and-forth banter and the physical contact are all missing. In fact, it’s often the extrovert who expounds upon the tragedy that social networks and smartphones are causing to society and interpersonal relationships.

It’s time to take a stand for all of you introverts who love Facebook as much as I do.

CONTINUE READING...

Introverts Don’t Look Up

Do you remember that viral video that spread throughout Facebook (ironically) like wildfire?

It expounded upon how our obsession with using smartphones to check email, social network status updates and other ways of remotely connecting with family and friends over the Internet is somehow destroying the fabric of society and interpersonal interactions.

It had millions of views, and oddly it’s now offline. However, the reaction I personally had to this video was expressed perfectly by a response video created by Murderbot Productions, called “Look Down”.

 

My favorite part of that rhyme went as follows:

“I mean start a conversation on the bus?
Are you kidding me? I’m talking all the time.
I’m learning constantly.

That my mother’s a much deeper person than I might ever have known her to be;
And that I have the funniest friends in the world;
especially those who are just on Reddit spreading new memes.

Loneliness is not in the global community;
if there’s a commonality you just can’t see, look a little harder because;
we all want the same thing.”

The part that hit the nail on the head as far as why Facebook appeals so much to the Introvert was a little further in the video, and went like this:

“An asshole in person is the same as online;
only worse because I can’t block you, and you’re harder to avoid.”

And that’s the crux of it. Introverts are the folks you see sitting at the corner table at the party, alone and uncomfortable, because they can’t stand being trapped in the middle of some mindless, mundane conversations with boring people. It gives them a headache. In real life, you can’t “block” the extrovert who just loves to hear themselves talk, and won’t ever shut up.

The Psychology of Introverts

In a fascinating, long-running study started in 1989 by Dr Jerome Kagan, researchers found that infants and toddlers who were hypersensitive to external stimuli, typically grew up to be quiet, reserved and thoughtful introverts.

“The higher the degree of ‘hypersensitivity’ an individual experiences towards sights, sounds, smells, and the closeness of other people, the more likely it is that those same individuals will seek to avoid them.

Hypersensitivity both creates and explains why introverts hold such a strong preference for seeking out quiet, serene and unpopulated spaces in which to live and work.”

It is for this very reason that the experience of using Facebook appeals so much more to introverted people. From the quiet comfort of your own home, you can enjoy a virtual “party” with friends and family.

You can exchange witty jokes, play online games together, and even dive into a long and very intimate instant chat with loved ones.

You can do all of that without having to endure a voice blasting into your ear from a telephone, without the distractions and background noise of an actual in-person party, and without the danger of an extrovert jumping into the conversation, tossing you aside, and taking over.

Extroverts Don’t Use Facebook as Much as Introverts

Really, the smoking gun that introverts love Facebook much more than extroverts is the fact that they use it more.

Late last year, Dr. Pavica Sheldon at the University of Alabama in Huntsville conducted a study on this very topic, which she published in the Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace. In that study, she found that while extroverts may be more active on Facebook, Introverts actually use the social network for much longer periods of time than extroverts.

In other words, even though the extroverts who are there tend to try to steal the limelight (just like they do in real life), Facebook is actually utilized much more by introverts.

Why? Because Facebook appeals to an introverts desire to control who they interact with, and how that interaction takes place. Unlike in-person environments where introverts often feel like they have no control over interactions.

This need to control how communication takes place is what makes social networks in general more appealing to introverts. Krystal D’Costa said it best in a Scientific American article on introverts online, when she wrote:

“…this has also long been a criticism of these forms of communication—the ideas that reducing direct contact actually hurts relationships. We know that these media are not well suited to fully capturing the nuances of a conversation. But for introverts, they might actually be ideal because they offer the chance to control the interaction.”

This is especially true on Facebook, where you can make your status updates visible only to the family and friends who you’ve accepted into your list of Facebook “friends”. You can tell Facebook not to show you updates in the news stream from people you find annoying or rude. If someone is obnoxious when commenting on your Facebook wall, you can simply remove them as a friend, and you never have to see or hear from them again.

For introverts, this is a dream come true.


DAILY MAIL, UK

Facebook and Twitter threat to marriages: Social media now a factor in one in seven divorces By STEVE DOUGHTY SOCIAL AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT FOR THE DAILY MAIL PUBLISHED: 23:00 GMT, 29 April 2015 | UPDATED: 23:00 GMT, 29 April 2015


One in seven people surveyed say they have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online social media sites, according to new research

New research found one in seven married individuals have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings on social media sites.

Nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of social media

454 shares 48 View comments Facebook and Twitter have become a significant threat to marriage – with social media now a factor in an increasing number of divorce cases, say lawyers. One in seven married individuals have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online sites, according to research.

A similar proportion admit that they search online for evidence of their partner’s infidelity, while nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of the way their husband or wife uses social media.

One in seven people surveyed say they have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online social media sites, according to new research One in seven people surveyed say they have considered divorce because of their spouse’s postings of Facebook or other online social media sites, according to new research

The research was commissioned by law firm Slater and Gordon in response to an increase in the number of its clients who said that Facebook, Skype, Snapchat, Twitter, What’sApp or other social media sites had played a part in their divorce. Andrew Newbury, of Slater and Gordon, said: ‘Five years ago Facebook was rarely mentioned in the context of a marriage ending, but now it has become commonplace.

‘Social media is the new marriage minefield. Social media, specifically pictures and posts on Facebook, are now being routinely raised in divorces.’


Nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of the way their husband or wife uses social media

READ MORE...

 The survey by Censuswide among 2,011 husbands and wives, found the most common reasons for checking their spouse’s social media accounts was to discover who they were talking to, who they were meeting and where they were going.

Nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of the way their husband or wife uses social media.

Nearly one in five say they have daily rows because of the way their husband or wife uses social media

A quarter of the married people said the resulting suspicions led to rows at least once a week, and 17 per cent said such rows were daily events.

Arguments were provoked by contact with former partners, by the sending of secret messages, and by the posting of ‘inappropriate’ pictures.

Some 14 per cent said they looked at their spouse’s social media with the specific intention of detecting evidence of adultery.

A fifth said they felt uneasy about their relationship after discovering something on their partner’s Facebook account and a third said they kept social media log-in details secret from partners.

Twitter’s value dropped by £5billion after its poor financial results were accidentally posted on its own site. Shares fell by 25 per cent in minutes when a glitch on the Nasdaq stock exchange posted the results early on Twitter’s website.

A financial monitoring service tweeted them, leading to panic selling. Twitter had planned to announce the figures after the markets ceased trading on Tuesday.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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