© Copyright, 2015 (PHNO)
 http://newsflash.org

PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

Zuckerberg video on Mai-Mai goes viral: YOUNG MOM IN ANTIQUE, PH ISLANDS FINISHED I.T. COURSE VIA FREE FACEBOOK APP, AMIDST KILLER TYPHOON 'YOLANDA'


OCTOBER 14 -Riza Mae Tachado (MAI-MAI) from Culasi, Antiqui, (ILOILO) PH --Riza Mae Tachado had no inkling that using a free Internet app would make her famous. On Tuesday, she woke up on Mararison island at Culasi town in Antique province, got online and found that Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder and CEO, had posted a video on how the Facebook app Internet.org had helped her in her schooling.Seven hours after Zuckerberg posted it on his Facebook page (3:39 p.m. Philippine time), the video had already racked up 3,346,603 views, 146,489 “likes” and 26,813 shares. “I’m having goose bumps. I still cannot believe it,” Tachado told the Inquirer in a telephone interview on Tuesday. Tachado, 24, or Mai-Mai to friends, said she did not expect the video to be posted by Zuckerberg on his Facebook page. “I’m just an islander. It feels like graduating again,” she said. The 71-second video shows how Tachado used the Internet.org app in working on her thesis and eventually earning a diploma on computer science. Internet.org allows free browsing of popular websites. “This is an amazing story about Riza—a young woman on a small island where the only job for women was collecting seashells, yet she used Internet.org to earn a degree in computer science,” Zuckerberg said in his post CONTINUE READING...

ALSO Inquirer Editorial: Mai-Mai’s world


OCTOBER 18 -Riza Mae Techado. SCREENGRAB from FACEBOOK VIDEO The story of the island girl using Internet.org to help her write her thesis and complete her college degree is delightful. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg thought so, too, which is why the story of Riza Mae Tachado, or Mai-Mai, now serves to inspire others like her who dream of a star and reach out to touch it. The message that she delivers is simple yet powerful: that neither financial limitations nor geographical isolation should get in the way when one means to get somewhere.
This story begins with a wonderfully ambitious creation. After conquering the world, Zuckerberg set out to bring the Web to the world through the Internet.org app. The Philippines was one of six countries in which the app was launched earlier this year. Zuckerberg said then in a Facebook post: “We’re one step closer to connecting the world as we launched Internet.org in the Philippines today. Now everyone in the country can have free access to Internet services for health, education, jobs and communication on the Smart [Communications] network.”  Internet.org proved to be positively game-changing for Mai-Mai, 24, who lives on tiny Mararison island (population: 700) in Culasi, Antique. With her husband (a fisherman named Romnick) and child (a 3-year-old daughter named Shecainah), she moved to the island in 2013 from Barangay Jalandoni in Culasi. She had been out of school for the past three years, but she decided to complete her studies and enrolled at the University of Antique in the town of Tibiao. On Mararison, most of the women made a living gathering and selling seashells. “But I wanted something greater for myself. So I decided to study computer science in town. I travelled by boat every day just to go to school,” Mai-Mai said in a video produced by the folks at Internet.org. The app not only provided Mai-Mai with access to useful sites, it also helped her stay in touch with her classmates when a powerful typhoon left her and the Mararison community stranded on the island for weeks. “My phone became a classroom to communicate with my group mates,” she said in the video. READ MORE...

ALSO: Mark Zuckerburg Shared The Story Of A Hard Working Filipina Goes Viral!


SCREENGRAB FROM FACEBOOK

WATCH: GOTO FACEBOOK >>> https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/10102421074005081/ The Founder of the biggest social media site Facebook Mark Zuckerburg shared the story of a young Filipina named Riza, who stopped dreaming and started working to achieve her goals. In the island where Riza came from, the only job available for the women is collecting sea shells. Aside from that, there is nothing more from them. But she knew that it was not what she wanted all along. With determination and perseverance, Riza claims that she wanted to be the first in their family to gain a degree in computer science and she made it happen with the help of ** Internet.org. ** It just happened that during the time that Riza and her group mates was supposed to make their thesis a strong typhoon hit the country causing them to be unable to see each other. But with the help of internet.org, she accessed Facebook and was able to communicate with her group mates and finish their thesis. Internet.org aims to provide free access to internet in places where the people could not go online. Posted by [Mark Zuckerberg](https://www.facebook.com/zuck) on Monday, October 12, 2015 Source: [Mark Zuckerberg](https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/10102421074005081?__mref=message_bubble) To view the original source of the topic, [please click here.](http://www.trendingnewsportal.com/2015/10/mark-zuckerburg-shared-story-hard-working-filipina.html) THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO FACEBOOK FREE APP INTERNET.ORG: 2/3 OF THE WORLD IS NOT CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET

Internet.org is a Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, nonprofits and local communities to connect the two thirds of the world that doesn’t have internet access.

Only 1 out of every 3 people can go online. Why aren’t more people connected? Devices are too expensive. Service plans are too expensive. Mobile networks are few and far between. Content isn’t available in the local language. People aren't sure what value the internet will bring. Power sources are limited or costly. Networks can’t support large amounts of data. Together we can remove these barriers and give the unconnected majority of the world the power to connect.Initiative participants share tools, resources and best practices to explore solutions in three major opportunity areas: affordability, efficiency and business models.

ALSO: In turmoil, Internet.org face criticisms; Facebook changes its name


internet_org_free_basics_facebook
Despite good intentions, the project Internet.org launched by Mark Zuckerberg continues to wipe criticism, accused of purely mercenary aims and to undermine net neutrality. In the interests of transparency, the site of Internet.org changes to "Free basics by Facebook." All we delete and start again? This is what seems to Mark Zuckerberg. Since the launch of Internet.org two years ago, nothing goes as planned. Originally, this project had the ambition to bring Internet everywhere, especially in the most remote corners of the planet where Internet access is scarce or non-existent, but also to offer applications and services to necessities. Through partnerships with local entrepreneurs, sixty services are now available articulated three major themes: health, educations and economic information (jobs) and in 19 countries. Access to Facebook is of course offered. PUBLICITY Beautiful initiative, just like Google and Internet balloons Loom Project, but wiping rain from critics. Internet.org would be too restrictive and would favor Facebook and its partners (this Messenger in the default services offered, like the Bing search engine, Microsoft ownership, Internet.org partner.) "If someone can not afford a connection, it is always better to have access [limit Internet] rather than no access at all. " (Mark Zuckerberg) If Mark Zuckerberg tried to put the controversy in a post, a new hatched soon after, India: according to several publishers, Internet.org would harm net neutrality, some partners have preferred to sail. Since Facebook has revised its copy with an open platform and uncapped for developers who wish to work coupled with a complete lack of advertising. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Zuckerberg video on Mai-Mai goes viral

ILOILO CITY, OCTOBER 19, 2015 (INQUIRER) By: Nestor P. Burgos Jr.@inquirerdotnet Inquirer Visayas
01:03 AM October 14th, 2015—Riza Mae Tachado had no inkling that using a free Internet app would make her famous.

On Tuesday, she woke up on Mararison island at Culasi town in Antique province, got online and found that Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder and CEO, had posted a video on how the Facebook app Internet.org had helped her in her schooling.

Seven hours after Zuckerberg posted it on his Facebook page (3:39 p.m. Philippine time), the video had already racked up 3,346,603 views, 146,489 “likes” and 26,813 shares.

“I’m having goose bumps. I still cannot believe it,” Tachado told the Inquirer in a telephone interview on Tuesday.
Tachado, 24, or Mai-Mai to friends, said she did not expect the video to be posted by Zuckerberg on his Facebook page. “I’m just an islander. It feels like graduating again,” she said.

The 71-second video shows how Tachado used the Internet.org app in working on her thesis and eventually earning a diploma on computer science. Internet.org allows free browsing of popular websites.

“This is an amazing story about Riza—a young woman on a small island where the only job for women was collecting seashells, yet she used Internet.org to earn a degree in computer science,” Zuckerberg said in his post

 (https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/10102421074005081/?__mref=message_bubble).

CONTINUE READING...

Connected


MARK ZUCKERBERG, FACEBOOK FOUNDER AND CEO

“Being connected means having opportunity. We’re going to connect the whole world so one day everyone can achieve their full human potential—just like Riza,” he said.

A mother of a 3-year-old girl, Tachado stopped schooling for three years due to financial problems before she decided to continue her studies in 2013 at the University of Antique in Tibiao town.

On the video, Tachado narrated that she was living on an island were the main means of livelihood for women was gathering shells.
“But I wanted more for myself,” she said in Filipino with English subtitles.

On the video, she also said she used the Internet.org app to communicate with her thesis group mates when she was stranded on the island for several weeks due to a storm.

She said in the interview that she used the app to access Wikipedia, Facebook.com and Ask.com to chat with her group mates on work on their thesis on the automated water billing system of Culasi, AntiquI Island, Philippines.

Graduation


MAI-MAI TACHADO FACEBOOK PHOTO

Graduating from college last April was a significant step for her in aspiring for better opportunities. “I’m proud to be the first in my family to earn a computer science degree,” she said on the video.

A former resident of Barangay Jalandoni in the town proper, Tachado has been staying in Mararison since 2013 together with her husband Romnick and daughter Shecainah.

She is a homemaker while her husband earns a living through fishing.

Mararison, which has about 700 residents, is one of three islands of Culasi town, about 90 kilometers north of the capital town of San Jose.

Hit by Yolanda

The island was among those worst-hit by Supertyphoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan) on Nov. 8, 2013.

But in recent months, the island has drawn a growing number of tourists because of its white sand beach, pristine diving sites and rich marine resources.

In May, staff members of Internet.org contacted her on the possible filming of a video on her use of the application. “I thought it was a prank call. But I was surprised when they actually arrived here,” she said.

The filming took about four days in June. The team said it would send her a link to the video once it was posted.

Teasing

Tachado told the Inquirer friends and residents of Mararison had been teasing her since the video was taken in June and when it was posted online on Tuesday.

“They tell me that I’m already a celebrity and they want to ask for my autograph,” she said, laughing.

Renee Gertjejansen Briscoe, one of those who commented on Zuckerberg’s post, said: “What an amazing woman … . Mark Zuckerberg you should hire her!”

Zuckerberg, one of the world’s richest businessman, replied: “That’s a good idea!”


INQUIRER EDITORIAL: Mai-Mai’s world @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 01:12 AM October 18th, 2015


Riza Mae Techado. SCREENGRAB from FACEBOOK VIDEO

The story of the island girl using Internet.org to help her write her thesis and complete her college degree is delightful. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg thought so, too, which is why the story of Riza Mae Tachado, or Mai-Mai, now serves to inspire others like her who dream of a star and reach out to touch it. The message that she delivers is simple yet powerful: that neither financial limitations nor geographical isolation should get in the way when one means to get somewhere.

This story begins with a wonderfully ambitious creation. After conquering the world, Zuckerberg set out to bring the Web to the world through the Internet.org app. The Philippines was one of six countries in which the app was launched earlier this year. Zuckerberg said then in a Facebook post: “We’re one step closer to connecting the world as we launched Internet.org in the Philippines today. Now everyone in the country can have free access to Internet services for health, education, jobs and communication on the Smart [Communications] network.”

Internet.org proved to be positively game-changing for Mai-Mai, 24, who lives on tiny Mararison island (population: 700) in Culasi, Antique. With her husband (a fisherman named Romnick) and child (a 3-year-old daughter named Shecainah), she moved to the island in 2013 from Barangay Jalandoni in Culasi. She had been out of school for the past three years, but she decided to complete her studies and enrolled at the University of Antique in the town of Tibiao.

On Mararison, most of the women made a living gathering and selling seashells. “But I wanted something greater for myself. So I decided to study computer science in town. I travelled by boat every day just to go to school,” Mai-Mai said in a video produced by the folks at Internet.org.

The app not only provided Mai-Mai with access to useful sites, it also helped her stay in touch with her classmates when a powerful typhoon left her and the Mararison community stranded on the island for weeks. “My phone became a classroom to communicate with my group mates,” she said in the video.

READ MORE...

Mai-Mai and her colleagues focused their thesis on Culasi’s automated billing system, according to a report by the Inquirer’s Nestor P. Burgos Jr. She graduated last April with a degree in computer science, now equipped for bigger things and thankful for having achieved something she once doubted she could pull off.

In May, Mai-Mai received a call informing her of Internet.org’s interest in filming a video. “I thought it was a prank call, but I was surprised when they finally arrived here,” she told the Inquirer’s Burgos. In the video, she recounted how she used the app in her studies, leading to the completion of her degree.

She waited for the video to be posted but had no idea how big the posting would be. Last Tuesday, the video was posted by Zuckerberg himself on his Facebook page, with a message praising her determination. “Being connected means having opportunity. We’re going to connect the whole world so one day everyone can achieve their full human potential—just like Riza,” he said.

The video became a hit, soon racking up more than 5 million views and turning Mai-Mai into an instant sensation. “They tell me that I’m already a celebrity and they want to ask for my autograph,” she told Burgos with a laugh. “I’m having goose bumps. I still cannot believe it. I’m just an islander. It feels like graduating again.”

It’s indeed a delightful story of a young woman who was able to translate a newfound connectivity into an opportunity for a better life. “It feels like graduating again.” This is the promise of the Internet democratized, empowering people around the world who would otherwise not have access to this life-changing development and lighting up their lives.

Imagine the limitless possibilities for other young women like Mai-Mai, and more. Think of the children poring by candlelight over their borrowed books, and the universe of information just waiting to be unlocked in this swiftly connecting world.


PINOYVERGE.COM

Mark Zuckerburg Shared The Story Of A Hard Working Filipina Goes Viral! WATCH

The Founder of the biggest social media site Facebook Mark Zuckerburg shared the story of a young Filipina named Riza, who stopped dreaming and started working to achieve her goals. In the island where Riza came from, the only job available for the women is collecting sea shells.

Aside from that, there is nothing more from them. But she knew that it was not what she wanted all along. With determination and perseverance, Riza claims that she wanted to be the first in their family to gain a degree in computer science and she made it happen with the help of** Internet.org. **

It just happened that during the time that Riza and her group mates was supposed to make their thesis a strong typhoon hit the country causing them to be unable to see each other.

But with the help of internet.org, she accessed Facebook and was able to communicate with her group mates and finish their thesis. Internet.org aims to provide free access to internet in places where the people could not go online.

https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/10102421074005081/


SCREENGRAB FROM FACEBOOK VIDEO

This is an amazing story about Riza -- a young woman on a small island where the only job for women was collecting seashells, yet she used Internet.org to earn a degree in computer science.Being connected means having opportunity. We're going to connect the whole world so one day everyone can achieve their full human potential -- just like Riza.

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Monday, October 12, 2015

INTERNET.ORG ON FACEBOOK: 2/3 OF THE WORLD IS NOT CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET

Internet.org is a Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, nonprofits and local communities to connect the two thirds of the world that doesn’t have internet access.

Only 1 out of every 3 people can go online.

Why aren’t more people connected? Devices are too expensive. Service plans are too expensive. Mobile networks are few and far between. Content isn’t available in the local language. People aren't sure what value the internet will bring. Power sources are limited or costly. Networks can’t support large amounts of data. Together we can remove these barriers and give the unconnected majority of the world the power to connect.

Initiative participants share tools, resources and best practices to explore solutions in three major opportunity areas: affordability, efficiency and business models.

CONTINUE READING...

AFFORDABILITY

No one should have to choose between food or medicine and access to the internet.Internet.org supporters will join forces to develop technology that decreases the cost of delivering data to people worldwide, and helps expand internet access in under-served communities.

EFFICIENCY

Transmitting data—even a text message or a simple web page—requires bandwidth, something that’s scarce in many parts of the world.Partners will invest in tools and software to improve data compression capabilities and make data networks and services run more efficiently.

BUSINESS MODELS

Connecting billions of people will be a massive global effort that requires ongoing innovation.Developers, mobile operators and device manufacturers will work together to introduce business models that give people more ways to go online.

We’re in this together.
Making the internet available to every person on earth is a goal too large and too important for any one company, group or government to solve alone. Everyone participating in Internet.org has come together to meet this challenge because they believe in the power of a connected world.

At Internet.org, we’re turning bold ideas into practical solutions for a connected world.

CLICK HERE ON YOUR FACEBOOK FOR MORE.....https://internet.org/projects


HOWEVER:

FROM JOURNALDUGEEK.COM

In turmoil, Internet.org face criticisms; Facebook changes its name By Elodie, September 28, 2015 at 3:14 p.m. 0 comment Report an error 52 SHARES 3


internet_org_free_basics_facebook

Despite good intentions, the project Internet.org launched by Mark Zuckerberg continues to wipe criticism, accused of purely mercenary aims and to undermine net neutrality.

In the interests of transparency, the site of Internet.org changes to "Free basics by Facebook."

All we delete and start again? This is what seems to Mark Zuckerberg. Since the launch of Internet.org two years ago, nothing goes as planned.

Originally, this project had the ambition to bring Internet everywhere, especially in the most remote corners of the planet where Internet access is scarce or non-existent, but also to offer applications and services to necessities.

Through partnerships with local entrepreneurs, sixty services are now available articulated three major themes: health, educations and economic information (jobs) and in 19 countries. Access to Facebook is of course offered.

PUBLICITY

Beautiful initiative, just like Google and Internet balloons Loom Project, but wiping rain from critics. Internet.org would be too restrictive and would favor Facebook and its partners (this Messenger in the default services offered, like the Bing search engine, Microsoft ownership, Internet.org partner.)

"If someone can not afford a connection, it is always better to have access [limit Internet] rather than no access at all. " (Mark Zuckerberg)

If Mark Zuckerberg tried to put the controversy in a post, a new hatched soon after, India: according to several publishers, Internet.org would harm net neutrality, some partners have preferred to sail.

Since Facebook has revised its copy with an open platform and uncapped for developers who wish to work coupled with a complete lack of advertising.

READ MORE...

It is clear that this was not enough, Internet.org still seems to suffer from the (bad?) Gargantua Reputation Facebook.

Also, two important changes have recently been made ​​September 24: The connection will now be encrypted and secured (https) - Finished the fears intrusion of hackers - and Internet.org changes name, for the website and the mobile app and becomes Free Basics by Facebook.

Thus, initiative and services are being distinguished.

It is not said that this step towards greater transparency will be sufficient to end the controversy. However, Zuckerberg intends to prove its good faith, if not altruism.

Saturday, September 26, at a dinner organized by the Private Sector Forum of the United Nations, the founder of Facebook, sitting next to Angela Merkel promoted the Internet as a "tool for human rights" and a "peace motor", it intends to assist the United Nations to provide Internet access in the refugee camps.

"This is not altruism. We will all benefit from being more connected, "is it justified to deal first remarks making Facebook the largest recipient of his generosity. He gave no further explanation of how he was planning for it , reports the New York Times.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
© Copyright, 2015 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE