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TWEET JESUS! HOW POPE FRANCIS CAME TO RULE THE 'TWITTERVERSE'
[Pope Francis is best understood through Twitter, one author argues. It’s the retweets of his messages by his own followers that give him even greater reach.@BarackObama has more than 65 million followers, but on average gets about 1,200 retweets. @Pontifex gets 10,000.]


WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL TWITTER PAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS, Vatican City, news.va  FOLLOWING The Pope's tweets often consist of practical advice that recognizes human beings as prone to unlovely emotions. Tweet Jesus! As Michael J. O’Loughlin sees it, the much-loved Pope Francis is cannily spreading the gospel 140 characters at a time. O’Loughlin, 29, is a reporter for the Boston Globe’s Crux, a project covering the Catholic Church, and has just published The Tweetable Pope. In the book, he makes the case that Francis, who though almost 80 and fronting one of the world’s oldest institutions, is best understood through the thoroughly modern lens of Twitter.Handling Twitter While his predecessor Benedict XVI authored the first papal tweet on Dec. 12, 2012, two months before vacating the papacy, it’s Francis who has made a name for himself in the Twitterverse. “Using his @Pontifex account, Pope Francis communicates ancient truths, spiritual insights and bursts of wisdom instantly to his millions of followers,” O’Loughlin writes. As O’Loughlin explains, Francis doesn’t hit send on his own tweets. Instead, he comes up with ideas. His staff then print proposed messages in Italian or Spanish, the Pope’s two primary languages, and bring them back to him. Once he signs off, they’re taken to the Vatican Secretary of State’s office and away they go. “I thought he would have farmed out the entire operation to a PR team, but I was surprised that he’s as involved as he is,” O’Loughlin told Star Touch.Tweet forth and multiply
The annual Twiplomacy analysis of Twitter accounts said in April that, for the third year running, Pope Francis was the most influential Tweeting global leader. Worldwide leaders for English-language tweeting are, not surprisingly, from the laity — Katy Perry and Justin Bieber. Francis ranks well back, with more than 7 million followers. But he tweets in several languages and his combined total of followers is more than 21 million.“When in history has a pope ever been able to communicate directly to 21 million people at a time?” O’Loughlin writes. “Before television the answer would be never. Even with television, the answer would be very rarely. This Pope reaches 21 million people, on average, four to five times a week.” It’s the retweets of his messages by his own followers that give him even greater reach. READ MORE...

ALSO Twitter: a step-by-step guide to getting started


If the recent buzz around Twitter, the micro-blogging platform, has aroused your curiosity you may be wondering how to get started.
Twitter is not a publishing platform, as I said yesterday, so you can’t simply go to the site and read it. Well, you can but that’s not really the point. To get the most out of Twitter you need to build a network and then start using a few tools.So here’s a step-by-step guide. Getting started 1. Twitter allows you to send short messages to tell the world what you're doing, thinking, reading or whatever else you feel like saying. If you use Facebook, think of it as being like the status updates. The service allows you to follow people and be followed by people. The people you follow will form your network and their updates will appear on your Twitter homepage. The people who follow you have chosen to have you in their network and see your updates. However, Twitter is asynchronous. You don’t need to follow everyone who follows you. So you may be in my network but I don’t have to be in yours. READ ON FROM STEPD 2 TO 13 AND FIRST TWEET SAMPLES...

ALSO WATCH! IF GOD HAD A TWITTER: CREATION STORY

FROM YOU TUBE.......


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

How Pope Francis came to rule the Twitterverse


The Pope's tweets often consist of practical advice that recognizes human beings as prone to unlovely emotions. VINCENZO PINTO / AFP/GETTY IMAGES

TORONTO, CANADA, SEPTEMBER 28, 2015 (TORONTO STAR) By: Jim Coyle News, Published on Thu Sep 24 2015 - Tweet Jesus!

As Michael J. O’Loughlin sees it, the much-loved Pope Francis is cannily spreading the gospel 140 characters at a time. O’Loughlin, 29, is a reporter for the Boston Globe’s Crux, a project covering the Catholic Church, and has just published The Tweetable Pope.

In the book, he makes the case that Francis, who though almost 80 and fronting one of the world’s oldest institutions, is best understood through the thoroughly modern lens of Twitter.

Handling Twitter

While his predecessor Benedict XVI authored the first papal tweet on Dec. 12, 2012, two months before vacating the papacy, it’s Francis who has made a name for himself in the Twitterverse.

“Using his @Pontifex account, Pope Francis communicates ancient truths, spiritual insights and bursts of wisdom instantly to his millions of followers,” O’Loughlin writes.

As O’Loughlin explains, Francis doesn’t hit send on his own tweets. Instead, he comes up with ideas. His staff then print proposed messages in Italian or Spanish, the Pope’s two primary languages, and bring them back to him. Once he signs off, they’re taken to the Vatican Secretary of State’s office and away they go.

“I thought he would have farmed out the entire operation to a PR team, but I was surprised that he’s as involved as he is,” O’Loughlin told Star Touch.

Tweet forth and multiply

The annual Twiplomacy analysis of Twitter accounts said in April that, for the third year running, Pope Francis was the most influential Tweeting global leader.

Worldwide leaders for English-language tweeting are, not surprisingly, from the laity — Katy Perry and Justin Bieber. Francis ranks well back, with more than 7 million followers. But he tweets in several languages and his combined total of followers is more than 21 million.

“When in history has a pope ever been able to communicate directly to 21 million people at a time?” O’Loughlin writes.

“Before television the answer would be never. Even with television, the answer would be very rarely. This Pope reaches 21 million people, on average, four to five times a week.”

It’s the retweets of his messages by his own followers that give him even greater reach.

READ MORE...

@BarackObama has more than 65 million followers, but on average gets about 1,200 retweets. @Pontifex gets 10,000.

Common-sense counsel

A quick glance through the collected tweets of @Pontifex “gives his followers a sense of his passions, priorities and plans for the church,” says O’Loughlin.

And it’s a medium that, on a significant level, fits the man, he argues. “This Pope says what’s on his mind in ways that ordinary, salt-of-the-earth believers can understand.”

To be sure, his tweets aren’t always lofty theology, but consist of practical advice that recognizes human beings as prone to unlovely emotions.

“Are you angry with someone? Pray for that person. That is what Christian love is.” — June 17, 2013.

How do you say ‘trending’ in Latin?

In his tweets, Francis does not work the ethereal realm, but finds his beat squarely on terra firma.

On Nov. 11, 2013, he tweeted “We remember the Philippines, Vietnam and the entire region hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Please be generous with prayers and concrete help.”

“It’s a powerful platform,” O’Loughlin said in an interview. “One tweet from the Pope can kind of get a topic trending.”

After the murderous attack on the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, he tweeted simply: #PrayersForParis.

He has tweeted about kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria, a tornado in Oklahoma, a ferry disaster in Korea, a mining disaster in Turkey, and, notably, about climate change.

“The earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth.” — June 12, 2015.

Old wine, new vessels

If, as O’Loughlin says, Francis tweets the Church’s ancient truths in a modern way, it’s worth considering that the teachings of Christ nicely lend themselves to brevity.

“Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (73 characters.)

“Let anyone among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” (63 characters.)

Perhaps no tweet from @Pontifex better captured his approach to the job than that of May 16, 2015.

“It is better to have a Church that is wounded but out in the streets than a Church that is sick because it is closed in on itself.”

As O’Loughlin said, “Francis wants the church to be where God’s people are, and many of us are on Twitter.”


UNBLOGGED FROM THE TELEGRAPH, UK (MEDIA GROUP)

Twitter: a step-by-step guide to getting started By Shane Richmond



If the recent buzz around Twitter, the micro-blogging platform, has aroused your curiosity you may be wondering how to get started.

Twitter is not a publishing platform, as I said yesterday, so you can’t simply go to the site and read it. Well, you can but that’s not really the point.

To get the most out of Twitter you need to build a network and then start using a few tools.

So here’s a step-by-step guide.

Getting started

1.
Twitter allows you to send short messages to tell the world what you're doing, thinking, reading or whatever else you feel like saying.

If you use Facebook, think of it as being like the status updates. The service allows you to follow people and be followed by people. The people you follow will form your network and their updates will appear on your Twitter homepage. The people who follow you have chosen to have you in their network and see your updates.

However, Twitter is asynchronous. You don’t need to follow everyone who follows you. So you may be in my network but I don’t have to be in yours.

READ ON...

2. Go to Twitter and create an account. You can give yourself any username you like but it’s best to choose something that people who know you will recognise: that will make it easier for them to find and follow you.

3. Fill in your biography. Say something about yourself. It helps people to decide whether they should follow you.

4. Post your first tweet. It should go in the box underneath the question “What are you doing?” and it must be 140 characters or fewer.

Soon you’ll start building your network and you’ll want to have something on your page when your first visitors arrive. Try to post something that, in conjunction with your biography, will give people a reason to follow you.

“Trying to understand Twitter” is fine as a first post but you need to follow it up very quickly with something more individual. Try posting a link to the most interesting article you’ve read recently, for example.

Start building your network

5.
Start building your network. Look for friends and colleagues who are already using the site by clicking ‘find people’ at the top of the page.

When you find someone who you want to add to your network, click on their name to see their page and then click ‘follow’.

6. Following people is the easiest way to let them know you are there and some of them will soon start following you in return.

Your page will display a count of the number of people following you and the numbers you are following.

You can stop following people in your network at any time by going to their page, clicking ‘following’ and then clicking ‘remove’.

7. Each time you find someone you want to follow take a look at who they are following.

Add anyone who looks interesting and even a few people you aren’t sure about.

The more, the merrier. Try to add around 100 people so that you have a busy network. Remember – you can prune your network as you get a feel for who’s who.

Don’t be disheartened if it takes a while for your number of followers to grow.

Talking to people


8. Most of the time you’ll be posting updates on what you’re doing. And if that’s all you do, that’s fine. Don’t feel obliged to keep your followers entertained.

9. Sometimes you’ll want to join a conversation. You can send a public reply to people by putting @ before their username and then typing your message.

So putting @shanerichmond would direct your reply to me. The person you are replying to doesn’t need to be someone you are following and doesn’t need to be following you for the @ system to work.

On Twitter.com, a reply button will be visible when you hold your cursor over a message. Clicking this will add the @ automatically.
Click Settings on Twitter.com and then Notices to decide how @ replies are displayed within your network.
If you choose “all @ replies” you’ll see conversations people in your network are having with others. This is a good way to find new people to follow.

If you want to send a message to someone but don’t want all your followers to see it, you can send a direct message.

Put d and then the person’s username to send a private message.
Remember to leave a space, like this: d shanerichmond.

You can also click Direct Messages on the right-hand side of Twitter.com to get a box specifically for sending direct messages.

10. If one of your followers says something so brilliant that you want to share it with your followers, you can “retweet” it.

The etiquette for doing this is to put “retweet”, “retweeting” or just “RT” at the start of your message then add the @ symbol and the person’s username and then their message. For example, type “RT @shanerichmond” to retweet one of my messages. It’s acceptable to edit their message to make it fit the 140 character limit.

11. There may be lots of people talking about a particular topic but unless they are in your network or send you a reply you won’t even know they’re there.

This is where hashtags come in. By adding a # and then a keyword, lots of unconnected people can join a conversation. These tweets are sometimes collated at specific sites but can easily be found using the Twitter search engine.

For example, Norwich City supporters often add #NCFC to their tweets, which are then collated by Norwich City writer Rick Waghorn at his site.

12. You can save a message to read later or just for posterity by clicking the star that appears when you hover your cursor over it.

Tools

13.
Twitter’s great but Twitter.com isn’t.

First of all, you need to visit it or keep it open all the time to follow activity in your network.

Secondly, it doesn’t update automatically so you need to keep refreshing to see new messages.

A Twitter client is the answer. This is a small program that sits on your desktop and makes it easy to keep track of incoming messages.

Many Twitter clients make it easier to reply, retweet and follow different groups of people. I use Twhirl but you could also try Tweetdeck, Twitterific or Twitterfox.



14. If you want to post a link you’ll need a link-shortening site.

Some Twitter clients have this tool built in but you can go to a site such as TinyURL, paste in your link and get a shorter URL to help you stay within that 140-character limit.

15. If you like playing with stats, try Tweetstats. It will tell you how often you tweet, when you tweet and what you talk about.

16. There are lots more tools. Mashable has a good selection.

If that sounds like a lot to take in, don’t worry. You’ll quickly get the hang of it and you’ll soon decide whether Twitter’s for you. Enjoy!

Yesterday's post: Twitter looks like a publishing platform but it isn't one

THE AUTHOR:


Shane Richmond
Follow me on Twitter
Shane Richmond is Head of Technology (Editorial) for Telegraph Media Group. He first joined the Telegraph in 1998 and has been Online News Editor and Communities Editor. He writes about all kinds of technology but especially Apple, iOS, ebooks and ereaders, and digital media.

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EXAMPLES OF FIRST TWEETS

ELLEN DEGENERE's FIRST TWEET

Ellen arrived a little late to the Twitterverse back in March of 2009. By that time, fellow celeb Ashton Kutcher was already well on his way to becoming the first user with 1 million followers (narrowly beating out CNN).

Ellen’s first tweet "Is this anything?" is a good example of the skepticism of the time, when the public was still unsure about the network and its staying power.

Times have changed. Ellen currently has nearly 30 million followers, leaving Kutcher in the dust. Her secret? Apart from being ridiculously funny, her tweets mix authenticity with uncanny business savvy on what’s trending and why.

Most recently, Ellen was behind the most retweeted message ever, the legendary Oscar ceremony celebrity selfie, shared some 2 million times before the show was even over.

Seemingly spontaneous, the selfie was actually part of a planned $20 million ad campaign paid for by phone maker Samsung—proof that social media has definitely come a long way.

ASHTON KUTCHER's FIRST TWEET

POPE FRANCIS' FIRST TWEET


VATICAN-RELIGION-POPE-INTERNET-TWITTER-LATIN GABRIEL BOUYS A man holds a smartphone showing Pope Francis' first tweet in front of a computer screen showing the same tweet on March 17, 2013, in Rome. Against all the odds, Pope Francis's Latin-language Twitter account is a roaring success, boasting 205,000 followers -- more than those following papal tweets in German or Arabic. Two months after former pontiff Benedict XVI joined the social networking site, enthusiasts of the ancient language persuaded him to open an account in Latin, without banking on it having much success, and the response stunned them. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS

BARACK OBAMA's FIRST TWEET


US-POLITICS-OBAMA-TWITTER MANDEL NGAN An illustration shows US President Barack Obama's Twitter page on a laptop in Washington, DC on May 18, 2015. 'Hello, Twitter! It's Barack. Really! Six years in, they're finally giving me my own account.'With that inaugural Tweet sent from a smart phone the Oval Office before jumping on Marine One Monday, the President of the United States Barack Obama -- or @POTUS - cast off security and bureaucratic chains in place since he was elected. The account -- which already had nearly 150,000 followers in the first half hour -- will instantly become one of the world's top hacking targets, but it will also allow Obama to communicate directly for the first time. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN

THE DALAI LAMA


ALSO WATCH!

IF GOD HAD A TWITTER: THE CREATION STORY

 
https://youtu.be/PaPZGWzohIQ


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