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FROM HOLLYWOOD: NERDS SHALL INHERIT THE EARTH


AUGUST 23 -ADAM Sandler admits he has a quick fuse. RUBEN V. NEPALES
LOS ANGELES -Classic 1980s video game characters like Pac-Man, Donkey Kong and Space Invaders are back in “Pixels,” an action-comedy starring Adam Sandler, Josh Gad, Michelle Monaghan, Peter Dinklage and Kevin James. Chris Columbus directs the movie about aliens misinterpreting video feeds of popular arcade games as a declaration of war. So they send arcade game monsters to destroy earth. The following are excerpts from our interviews with Adam, Josh and Michelle. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: 'PIXELS', THE MOVIE

 
The first trailer for Sony's upcoming video game movie Pixels--which stars Adam Sandler and Peter Dinklage
URL: https://youtu.be/XAHprLW48no

ALSO: ABOUT 'NERDS'


Nerd (adjective: nerdy) is a descriptive term, often used pejoratively, indicating that a person is overly intellectual, obsessive, or lacking social skills.
They may spend inordinate amounts of time on unpopular, obscure, or non-mainstream activities, which are generally either highly technical or relating to topics of fiction or fantasy, to the exclusion of more mainstream activities.Additionally, many nerds are described as being shy, quirky, and unattractive, and may have difficulty participating in, or even following, sports. Though originally derogatory, "Nerd" is a stereotypical term, but as with other pejoratives, it has been reclaimed and redefined by some as a term of pride and group identity. The first documented appearance of the word "nerd" is as the name of a creature in Dr. Seuss's book If I Ran the Zoo (1950), in which the narrator Gerald McGrew claims that he would collect "a Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too" for his imaginary zoo.The slang meaning of the term dates to the next year, 1951, when Newsweek magazine reported on its popular use as a synonym for "drip" or "square" in Detroit, Michigan.By the early 1960s, usage of the term had spread throughout the United States, and even as far as Scotland. At some point, the word took on connotations of bookishness and social ineptitude.An alternate spelling, as nurd, also began to appear in the mid-1960s or early 1970s. Author Philip K. Dick claimed to have coined this spelling in 1973, but its first recorded use appeared in a 1965 student publication at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. READ MORE...

ALSO: Your Digital photos and your Digital camera -


Digital cameras are confusing to a lot of new users. In this basic guide to digital camera technology we hope to try to give digital beginners at least some basis to use in deciding which digital camera is appropriate for them. When shopping for a digital camera it's at least good to know what the basic terms like white balance, pixel, ppi and dpi mean and how they affect image and print quality. It's also important to know the difference between things like optical zoom and digital zoom as well as the advantages and disadvantages between storage formats such as Compact Flash (CF), Microdrives, Sony Memory Stick, Secure Digital (SD), Multimedia and camera interface technologies such as USB 1.1, USB 2.0 and Firewire IEEE 1394.
Pixels A pixel is a contraction if the term PIcture ELement. Digital images are made up of small squares, just like a tile mosaic on your kitchen or bathroom wall. Though a digital photograph looks smooth and continuous just like a regular photograph, it's actually composed of millions of tiny squares as shown below. READ MORE...

ALSO iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: iSight and FaceTime camera shootout!


REVIEW FROM iMORE.COM: From general photography to low light scenes to macro and back, how does the iPad Air iSight camera compare to the iPhone 5s? While the iPad Air now has the same, improved front-facing FaceTime HD camera as the iPhone 5s - and every other 2013 iOS device - its rear-facing iSight camera remains very much unchanged from the iPad 4 and original iPad mini. What has changed however is the software and hardware that power it. With iOS 7 and the very same Apple A7 found in the iPhone 5s - and the very same image signal processor (ISP) - the iPad Air could see an overall boost in quality anyway. To measure how it stacks up, we put the 5 megapixel iPad Air camera up against the 8 megapixel camera, not see if it would win - it doesn't have a chance - but to see how close it can come!
iSight camera evolution The original iPad had no cameras. None. The iPad 2 had both iSight and FaceTime cameras at VGA resolution, which is only barely better than not having any at all. The iPad 3 and iPad 4 both had 5 megapixel cameras, but Apple A5X and Apple A6X processors behind them respectively. Better, but not outstanding. The iPad Air does nothing to improve the glass, so any differences here will come purely down to the A7 chipset. Keeping it consistent Unless otherwise specified, I used default settings for every picture, meaning I used the iSight Camera right out of the box. I also did not manually focus on anything, I let the software do all the work and balance images the way it saw it. I think this gives a better overall picture of how the software and hardware work together. The only thing I did enable on both devices were grid lines to help me try and get the exact same shot each time. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Nerds shall inherit the earth


ADAM Sandler admits he has a quick fuse. RUBEN V. NEPALES

LOS ANGELES, AUGUST 31 2015  (INQUIRER) By: Ruben V. Nepales @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:30 AM August 23rd, 2015 - Classic 1980s video game characters like Pac-Man, Donkey Kong and Space Invaders are back in “Pixels,” an action-comedy starring Adam Sandler, Josh Gad, Michelle Monaghan, Peter Dinklage and Kevin James.

Chris Columbus directs the movie about aliens misinterpreting video feeds of popular arcade games as a declaration of war. So they send arcade game monsters to destroy earth.

The following are excerpts from our interviews with Adam, Josh and Michelle.

CONTINUE READING...

Adam Sandler

Were you in love with video games before you were in love with girls?

ADAM:

They went together. I went down mostly to see girls at the arcades but no girls were looking back so that’s why I started enjoying the games.

Josh mentioned that he had quite a tough time in the car scenes. Can you talk about riding around with him?

We had fun doing that because when Josh bent over, I noticed in my rear view mirror that his pants were slightly down. He was supposed to be very still and we were supposed to be unaware that he was there. But I saw the top part of his beautiful buttocks sticking out. That’s in the movie for your enjoyment and you will see.

What brings out the monster in you?

There are many times it comes out. I have a quick fuse, but it goes away pretty quickly also. Usually, when I want to go out to eat, everyone wants a different restaurant. I am angry that I don’t get to go where I want to go (laughs). That’s usually the most aggravating situation.

Can you talk about working with Peter Dinklage?

He is fantastic. He is pretty electric out there. The audience buzzes when they see him. He’s so calm, funny and dry and doesn’t overdo a thing. I love him in the part. He’s a very good man.

Do people always expect you to be on when they see you?

In real life, no, not much. Maybe when I was younger. People are very nice to me on the streets and wherever. On occasions, something goes wrong but most of the time, it’s pretty good. Nobody expects too much from me.

What game are you most proficient at?

Galaxian.

JOSH Gad

J
OSH Gad went to arcades “to check out ladies.” RUBEN V. NEPALES

Nerds used to be ostracized. Now, as in this movie, nerds are cool.

I always joke around that you couldn’t make the movie “Nerds” anymore. It would have to be called “Jocks” at this point because nerds have inherited the earth, from Silicon Valley and so on. We’re living in an age where every hero is a superhero, has a cape or a power of some sort.

So it’s nice to get a group of social miscasts (in a movie) who are like myself, who live with their mothers but can somehow save the world. It’s fun to have the opportunity to play a character who winds up being the hero in the movie.

Do you have a nerdy side?

You tell me. What do you see (laughs)?

So, from one nerd to another—more than a year later, can you tell me how a certain animated character impacted your career?

Olaf is one of those characters that, if you’re lucky, comes along once in a lifetime. If you’re Chris Pratt, it comes along every week. I have been blessed to be part of a movie that has transcended the zeitgeist and has become… a classic.

I was telling this story today. I was walking on the streets of Scotland and my 4-year-old daughter was running into the street. I was like “Oh, Ava, wait, wait, wait!” I raised my voice to save her life. This family walked by, looked at me and went, “We know that voice. Are you Olaf?” It’s always surreal because my voice gives me away. It’s weird to not be recognized for your face but for your voice.

Were you interested in girls before video games?

Yes. I actually used to go to arcades to check out some of the ladies. They did not reciprocate that look, I’ll have you know.

Did you impress them in high school?

I just started impressing them about a week ago. I won my wife over just recently (laughs).

How did you do that?

I showed her my paycheck from “Frozen.” No, it was one of those things when I grew up in the 1980s. In the ’80s, “arcading” was all we did. We didn’t have cell phones and those things so on a Saturday…

That’s what “Pixels” so brilliantly captures—the first reel comes up and you’re suddenly transported into this musty, synthetic, fog-filled atmosphere where you have a pizza in one hand and a joystick in the other. And you’re playing these games. Your friends are all gathered around and they’re all watching.

There was simplicity to the games… the graphics were so simple. You had a giant, disembodied yellow-faced creature going, “Waka waka waka,” chasing a bunch of ghosts. And that was enough. It was everything I knew. In many ways, it made me who I am. I savored those Saturdays where I could go to the Grand Prix Race-O-Rama in Florida.

You’re the only man in the family with your wife and two daughters. How much have they influenced you?

Even my dog is female. I’m becoming Caitlyn Jenner by the day. There’s going to be another press conference altogether soon. It’s amazing what being surrounded by estrogen 24 hours a day can do. I’ve become much more emotional than I’ve ever been before. I’m prone to mood swings and to monthly pains.

Can you talk about your relationship with birds and the bird that makes you angry?

A very profound question—thank you for that (laughs). I did grow up around birds. I actually have a great story. I went through this weird phase where I wanted parakeets badly so I convinced my mom to get me parakeets. If you’ve ever had a parakeet, it’s the worst investment you can ever make in your life because you can’t train them to do anything. They don’t speak. They just chirp nonstop.

I came back from summer camp one day and I looked at them cooped up in this little cage. I was like, this sucks. I felt bad so I let them out. This is in South Florida, by the way, where there are gators, snakes and large creatures everywhere.

I told my mom, thinking that she was going to be like, “That was a really responsible thing to do, thank you baby.” She looked at me and almost ripped my head off. She was like, “They’re going to get eaten by a hawk. What’s wrong with you?” So it was on that day that I learned that parakeets belonged in a cage apparently because they stood no chance in the jungles of South Florida.

Michelle Monaghan

How hard was it to keep a straight face with all these guys in your scenes?

It was very difficult because my character is kind of a straitlaced person. My character doesn’t find them charming when in reality I am completely charmed by every single one of these guys.

Chris (Columbus) is great. We always said the words on the page so we had the take that the writer intended us to have. But the great thing about all of them was that they were all fantastic at improvising so they would just one-up each other all the time.

Josh Gad is so, oh my gosh, funny. He’s so brilliant in the movie. He’s the one who, I think, thought we were making an R-rated movie the whole way through (laughs). You were like, “No, no, no, kind of reel it back in, Josh.” I had a real pleasure just listening to him and trying to keep a straight face.

(E-mail the columnist at rvnepales_5585@yahoo.com . Follow him at http://twitter.com/nepalesruben.


FROM WIKIPEDIA

PIXELS, THE MOVIE


Pixels Official Poster

Pixels is a 2015 American science fiction action comedy film produced by Columbia Pictures, 1492 Pictures and Happy Madison Productions.

The film was directed by Chris Columbus. Its screenplay was written by Tim Herlihy and Timothy Dowling, with a screen story penned by Tim Herlihy and based on French director Patrick Jean's 2010 short film of the same name.

The film features computer animated video games characters, special effects, and stars Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Josh Gad, Peter Dinklage, Michelle Monaghan, Brian Cox, Ashley Benson, and Jane Krakowski.

The film's plot has extraterrestrials misinterpreting video-feeds of classic arcade games as a declaration of war, and invading Earth using technology inspired by games such as Pac-Man and Space Invaders.

To counter the alien assault, the United States hire former arcade champions to lead the planet's defense.

Principal photography on the film began on June 2, 2014 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

It was released in 2D, 3D, and IMAX 3D on July 24, 2015. The film has grossed over $173 million worldwide but received generally negative reviews from critics.[5]

Plot

In the summer of 1982, Sam Brenner and Will Cooper are thirteen year olds who love playing in the local arcade. Brenner enters an arcade game world championships.

At the event, the MC tells that a time capsule will be launched into space containing elements of the championships. Brenner and Cooper meet Ludlow Lamonsoff, a child who's in love with Lady Lisa, the main character of the game Dojo Quest. Brenner succeeds in every game, but finally loses to Eddie Plant in Donkey Kong.

In the present, Brenner works for a company that installs home theater systems and Cooper is the President of the United States.

In Guam, a U.S. military base is attacked. The soldiers try to fight back, but are easily defeated, and one soldier is abducted (later revealed to be a trophy).

Brenner is sent to work at the home of Violet Van Patten, a divorcée who lives with her son Matty.

Brenner heads to the White House after receiving a call from Cooper. To his surprise, he finds out that Violet is a Lieutenant Colonel. Cooper brings Brenner into the Oval Office to show him the attack in the base. Brenner says that the way the attack was carried out was like in the classic version of the video game Galaga.

Later, Brenner drives home when Ludlow suddenly appears inside his van.

Ludlow takes Brenner to his home where he says that the aliens are sending creatures with classic video game designs to attack.

Ludlow found a message using manipulated footage to explain their plans: The tape was found and seen as a threat; they are using the video games as a challenge. If they win three rounds, they will claim the Earth. They show the video to Cooper and determine that the next attack will happen in India, but are too late; the Taj Mahal is attacked with Arkanoid paddles and another person is abducted.

Brenner and Ludlow are brought in to "train" soldiers by showing them how to play these games. Violet shows Brenner and Ludlow that the pixels are taken down by strong light beams. The next attack will happen in London.

The soldiers brace for attack in Hyde Park. Centipede appears in the sky. Brenner tells the men to shoot the head and anticipate the pattern, but they lack the skills, so more appear. Brenner and Ludlow take over with permission from Cooper and they defeat them. The aliens send a message to congratulate them on their victory, and give the Duck Hunt dog as a trophy, but remind that they are leading 2-1.

New York City is the place of the next attack. Ludlow and Cooper say that they need help. Brenner, Cooper, and Violet go to a prison to find Eddie, who is serving a sentence for counts of fraud. Cooper agrees to let Eddie out of prison and relinquish his taxes in exchange for his help.

The team discovers that they are going to face the title character from Pac-Man and in order to succeed they need to defeat him three times. Violet presents them with four Mini Cooper cars based on the ghosts in Pac-Man, with the other car driven by the game's creator, Toru Iwatani.

In the downtown area Iwatani tries to appeal to Pac-Man as a son, but gets his hand bitten off instead. The remaining three chase after Pac-Man. He eats a power pellet, which gives him the ability to eat ghosts, and Ludlow escapes as it eats his car. Eddie defeats the first Pac-Man after catching up to him quickly, to the surprise of everyone. Eddie takes Pac-Man out a second time, but accidentally drives into the East River as he attempts the 3-0 sweep. Brenner takes up the chase but Pac-Man finds another power pellet. Brenner drives backwards through a parking garage. The power pellet wears off, and Pac-Man is defeated. As a result, the team is given Q*bert as a trophy.

The team celebrate the victory, until the aliens send another message saying that someone cheated and the contest for the planet has been forfeited. Matty finds out Eddie used a speed cheat during the battle with Pac-Man. Eddie flees the scene and Matty is abducted as a trophy.

The aliens cascade more video games on Washington, D.C. as they prepare to take over. Cooper joins the team, while Ludlow stays to fight. One of the aliens takes the form of Lady Lisa. She fights Ludlow until he says he loves her, and they share a kiss. Eddie comes to fight as well.

Brenner, Violet, Cooper and Q*Bert are brought up to the space ship where they have to face the title character from Donkey Kong, who rolls barrels at the group to prevent them the captives/trophies. Matty reveals to Brenner what he found out about Eddie, and Brenner takes the hammer and throws it at Donkey Kong, destroying him. This causes the video games to freeze and then are brought back up to the ship, including Lady Lisa.

The team is recognized as heroes.

A peace agreement has been made with the aliens. Eddie reluctantly tells Brenner he is the best video game player. Q*bert randomly transforms into Lady Lisa, to Ludlow's delight. Brenner and Violet become a couple, while Eddie gets a text message from Serena Williams and Martha Stewart.

The alien ship finally departs from Earth, and Iwatani's hand is restored. One year later Ludlow and Lisa are married and parents of five Q*berts.


WIKIPEDIA

ABOUT 'NERDS'

Nerd (adjective: nerdy) is a descriptive term, often used pejoratively, indicating that a person is overly intellectual, obsessive, or lacking social skills.

They may spend inordinate amounts of time on unpopular, obscure, or non-mainstream activities, which are generally either highly technical or relating to topics of fiction or fantasy, to the exclusion of more mainstream activities.

Additionally, many nerds are described as being shy, quirky, and unattractive, and may have difficulty participating in, or even following, sports. Though originally derogatory, "Nerd" is a stereotypical term, but as with other pejoratives, it has been reclaimed and redefined by some as a term of pride and group identity.

The first documented appearance of the word "nerd" is as the name of a creature in Dr. Seuss's book If I Ran the Zoo (1950), in which the narrator Gerald McGrew claims that he would collect "a Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too" for his imaginary zoo.

The slang meaning of the term dates to the next year, 1951, when Newsweek magazine reported on its popular use as a synonym for "drip" or "square" in Detroit, Michigan.

By the early 1960s, usage of the term had spread throughout the United States, and even as far as Scotland. At some point, the word took on connotations of bookishness and social ineptitude.

An alternate spelling, as nurd, also began to appear in the mid-1960s or early 1970s. Author Philip K. Dick claimed to have coined this spelling in 1973, but its first recorded use appeared in a 1965 student publication at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Nerd (adjective: nerdy) is a descriptive term, often used pejoratively, indicating that a person is overly intellectual, obsessive, or lacking social skills.

They may spend inordinate amounts of time on unpopular, obscure, or non-mainstream activities, which are generally either highly technical or relating to topics of fiction or fantasy, to the exclusion of more mainstream activities.

Additionally, many nerds are described as being shy, quirky, and unattractive, and may have difficulty participating in, or even following, sports. Though originally derogatory, "Nerd" is a stereotypical term, but as with other pejoratives, it has been reclaimed and redefined by some as a term of pride and group identity.

The first documented appearance of the word "nerd" is as the name of a creature in Dr. Seuss's book If I Ran the Zoo (1950), in which the narrator Gerald McGrew claims that he would collect "a Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too" for his imaginary zoo.

The slang meaning of the term dates to the next year, 1951, when Newsweek magazine reported on its popular use as a synonym for "drip" or "square" in Detroit, Michigan.

By the early 1960s, usage of the term had spread throughout the United States, and even as far as Scotland. At some point, the word took on connotations of bookishness and social ineptitude.

An alternate spelling, as nurd, also began to appear in the mid-1960s or early 1970s. Author Philip K. Dick claimed to have coined this spelling in 1973, but its first recorded use appeared in a 1965 student publication at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

READ MORE...

Oral tradition there holds that the word is derived from "knurd" ("drunk" spelled backward), which was used to describe people who studied rather than partied.

The term nurd was in use at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as early as 1971. The Online Etymology Dictionary speculates that the word is an alteration of the 1940s term nert (meaning "stupid or crazy person"), which is itself an alteration of "nut". The term was popularized in the 1970s by its heavy use in the sitcom Happy Days. Typical stereotype Nerds can be described either by their hobbies and interests, or by abstract qualities such as personality, status, social skills, and physical appearance.

"Nerdy" interests

Some interests and activities that are likely to be described as nerdy [by whom?] are: Intellectual, academic, or technical hobbies, activities, and pursuits, especially topics related to science, mathematics, engineering, linguistics, economics, literature, sociology, geography, mythology, history, and technology.

Hobbies, games, and activities that are described as obsessive and "immature", such as trading cards, comic books, fantasy and science fiction novels, television programs and films, role-playing games, tabletop games, and video games and anime.

Oral tradition there holds that the word is derived from "knurd" ("drunk" spelled backward), which was used to describe people who studied rather than partied.

The term nurd was in use at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as early as 1971. The Online Etymology Dictionary speculates that the word is an alteration of the 1940s term nert (meaning "stupid or crazy person"), which is itself an alteration of "nut". The term was popularized in the 1970s by its heavy use in the sitcom Happy Days. Typical stereotype Nerds can be described either by their hobbies and interests, or by abstract qualities such as personality, status, social skills, and physical appearance.

"Nerdy" interests

Some interests and activities that are likely to be described as nerdy [by whom?] are: Intellectual, academic, or technical hobbies, activities, and pursuits, especially topics related to science, mathematics, engineering, linguistics, economics, literature, sociology, geography, mythology, history, and technology.

Hobbies, games, and activities that are described as obsessive and "immature", such as trading cards, comic books, fantasy and science fiction novels, television programs and films, role-playing games, tabletop games, and video games and anime.

Interest in the fine arts, non-mainstream music such as classical, progressive rock, techno, or folk music, hobbies (i.e., collecting), or other "obscure" interests. Heavy obsession with a topic that would otherwise be mainstream (such as a popular TV show or a sport).

An interest can also be nerdy because of its association with "nerdy" people.  Examples of such activities include computers, video games, the internet, books, movies, and television.

Personality and physical appearance

Stereotypical nerds are commonly seen as intelligent but socially and physically awkward. They would typically be perceived as either lacking confidence or being indifferent or oblivious to the negative perceptions held of them by others, with the result that they become frequent objects of scorn, ridicule, bullying, and social isolation.

Additionally, he says that the reason why many smart kids are unpopular is that they "don't have time for the activities required for popularity."

Stereotypical "nerd" appearance, often lampooned in caricatures, includes very large glasses, braces, severe acne and pants worn high at the waist.

In the media, many nerds are white males, portrayed as being physically unfit, either overweight or skinny due to lack of physical exercise .It has been suggested by some, such as linguist Mary Bucholtz, that being a nerd may be a state of being "hyperwhite" and rejecting African-American culture and slang that "cool" white children use.

However, after the Revenge of the Nerds movie franchise (with multicultural nerds), and the introduction of the Steve Urkel character on the television series Family Matters, nerds have been seen in all races and colors as well as more recently being a frequent young Asian or Indian male stereotype in North America.

Portrayal of "nerd girls", in films such as She's Out of Control, Welcome to the Dollhouse and She's All That depicts that smart but nerdy women might suffer later in life if they do not focus on improving their physical attractiveness.

In the United States, a 2010 study published in the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication indicated that Asian Americans are perceived as most likely to be nerds, followed by White Americans, while non-White Hispanics and Black Americans were perceived as least likely to be nerds.

Among Whites, Jews are perceived as the most nerdy and are stereotyped in similar ways to Asians.

Medical and mental disorders]

Nerdiness is often compared to one or more medical disorders.

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder symptoms, such as showing extreme interest in rules.
Sensory processing disorder due to the low muscle tone and problems with communication.
Asperger syndrome, due to the tendency to engage in intense, specific, obscure, or intellectual interests and to experience difficulty in social situations.Temple Grandin, who has Asperger syndrom'

Nerd pride

The rise of Silicon Valley and the American computer industry at large has allowed many "nerdy" people to accumulate large fortunes. Many stereotypically "nerdy" interests, such as superhero and science fiction works, are now popular culture hits.

Some measures of nerdiness are now allegedly considered desirable, as, to some, it suggests a person who is intelligent, respectful, interesting, and able to earn a large salary. Stereotypical nerd qualities are evolving, going from awkwardness and social ostracism to an allegedly more widespread acceptance and sometimes even celebration of their differences.

In the 1984 film Revenge of the Nerds, Robert Carradine worked to embody the nerd stereotype; in doing so, he helped create a definitive image of nerds.

Additionally, the storyline presaged, and may have helped inspire, the "nerd pride" that emerged in the 1990s.

American Splendor regular Toby Radloff claims this was the movie that inspired him to become "The Genuine Nerd from Cleveland, Ohio." In the American Splendor film, Toby's friend, American Splendor author Harvey Pekar, was less receptive to the movie, believing it to be hopelessly idealistic, explaining that Toby, an adult low income file clerk, had nothing in common with the middle class kids in the film who would eventually attain college degrees, success, and cease being perceived as nerds. Many, however, seem to share Radloff's view, as "nerd pride" has become more widespread in the years since.

MIT professor Gerald Sussman, for example, seeks to instill pride in nerds: My idea is to present an image to children that it is good to be intellectual, and not to care about the peer pressures to be anti-intellectual. I want every child to turn into a nerd - where that means someone who prefers studying and learning to competing for social dominance, which can unfortunately cause the downward spiral into social rejection. —Gerald Sussman, quoted by Katie Hafner, The New York Times, 29 August 1993

Bryan Caplan, a professor of economics at George Mason University, refers to himself as "an openly nerdy man" and has written of a "Jock/Nerd Theory of History". He believes that income redistribution is a tactic by Jocks to prevent Nerds from gaining power over them.

The popular computer-related news website Slashdot uses the tagline "News for nerds. Stuff that matters." The Charles J. Sykes quote "Be nice to nerds. Chances are you'll end up working for one" has been popularized on the Internet and incorrectly attributed to Bill Gates.

In Spain, Nerd Pride Day has been observed on May 25 since 2006, the same day as Towel Day, another somewhat nerdy holiday. The date was picked because it's the anniversary of the release of Star Wars: A New Hope.

The Green brothers, John Green and Hank Green of the popular YouTube account vlogbrothers have commonly referred to themselves as nerds, and much of their online personas are that of nerdy appeal.

In fact, the name their fans have adapted reflects the popularity of this nerdy subculture, "Nerdfighters" or "Nerdfighteria."

An episode from the animated series Freakazoid, titled "Nerdator", includes the use of nerds to power the mind of a Predator-like enemy. Towards the middle of the show, he gave this speech. : ...most nerds are shy ordinary-looking types with no interest in physical activity. But, what they lack in physical prowess they make up in brains.

Tell me, who writes all the best selling books? Nerds. Who makes all the top grossing movies? Nerds. Who designs computer programs so complex that only they can use them? Nerds.

And who is running for high public office? No one but nerds. ... Without nerds to lead the way, the governments of the world will stumble, they'll be forced to seek guidance from good-looking, but vapid airheads.

The Danish reality TV show FC Zulu, known in the internationally franchised format as FC Nerds, established a format wherein a team of nerds, after two or three months of training, competes with a professional soccer team.

Nerdcore hip hop is a subgenre of hip hop music that has risen in popularity over the last few years, often expressing nerd themes with pride and humor.

Notable artists include mc chris, MC Plus+, MC Hawking, MC Lars, MC Paul Barman, and MC Frontalot.[according to whom?]

The term nerdcore has seen wider application to refer to webcomics (most notably Penny Arcade, User Friendly, PvP, and Megatokyo)[according to whom?] and other media that express nerd themes without inhibition.

In addition, many standard hip hop musicians self-identify as nerds including XV, Hopsin, Childish Gambino and Shad.

In 2010, Lupe Fiasco and Pharrell Williams started the All City Chess Club, a movement for rappers who would be considered nerdy[by whom?] but do not fit into the nerdcore genre.[according to whom?]

Among those who self identify as part of the All City Chess Club include B.o.B and J. Cole. Some commentators consider that the word is devalued when applied to people who adopt a sub-cultural pattern of behaviour, rather than being reserved for people with a marked ability.


Your Digital photos and your Digital camera - A beginner's guide by Bob Atkins, 2003 @ photo.net

Digital cameras are confusing to a lot of new users.

In this basic guide to digital camera technology we hope to try to give digital beginners at least some basis to use in deciding which digital camera is appropriate for them.

When shopping for a digital camera it's at least good to know what the basic terms like white balance, pixel, ppi and dpi mean and how they affect image and print quality.

It's also important to know the difference between things like optical zoom and digital zoom as well as the advantages and disadvantages between storage formats such as Compact Flash (CF), Microdrives, Sony Memory Stick, Secure Digital (SD), Multimedia and camera interface technologies such as USB 1.1, USB 2.0 and Firewire IEEE 1394.

Pixels

A pixel is a contraction if the term PIcture ELement.

Digital images are made up of small squares, just like a tile mosaic on your kitchen or bathroom wall. Though a digital photograph looks smooth and continuous just like a regular photograph, it's actually composed of millions of tiny squares as shown below.

Basic digital camera guide - pixels


On the left the full image, on the right the area in the red square magnified to show individual pixels

Each pixel in the image has a numerical value of between 0 and 255 and is made up of three color channels.

So for example a pixel could be 37-red, 76-green and 125-blue and it would then look like this Digital Camera Guide colors.

Each pixel in the image has a numerical value of between 0 and 255 and is made up of three color channels. So for example a pixel could be 37-red, 76-green and 125-blue and it would then look like this Digital Camera Guide colors. There are over 16 million possible combinations using this scheme and each one represents a different color.

Computer savvy readers will note that each color in this scheme can be represented by an 8-bit number (byte), so the color of each pixel is defined by three color bytes.

This scheme can be expanded, for example to use 16-bits (two 8-bit bytes) for each color. Images using three 8-bit values are sometimes called 24-bit color images. Images using three 12-bit values for color definition are called 36-bit color images, and those using three 16-bit values are called 48-bit color images.

Pixel Count

One of the main ways that manufacturers categorize their digital cameras is in terms of pixel count. What this is, is the number of individual pixels that go into making each image.

Today this number varies between 1 million (1 Megapixel) to around 14 million (14 Megapixels).

A million pixels is abbreviated to MP, so a 1MP camera has 1 million pixels and a 3MP camera has 3 million pixels. Currently most popular consumer digital cameras have between 2MP and 5MP. A 3MP camera can make excellent 4"x6" prints and very good 5"x7" prints.

If you intend to make lots of 8"x10" prints, then perhaps a 4MP or 5MP camera would be a better choice.


Typical maximum image size vs. nominal Pixel Count. See below for comments on dpi and print size

Aspect Ratio

The aspect ratio of a camera is the ratio of the length of the sides of the images. For example, a traditional 35mm film frame is approximately 36mm wide and 24mm HIGH. This has an aspect ratio of 36:24, which can equally well be expressed as 3:2.

Some digicams use the same aspect ratio for their digital images. For example most digital SLR (single lens reflex) cameras have a 3:2 aspect ratio.

However, video monitors typically use a 4:3 aspect ratio. For example a monitor with a 800x600 display has a 4:3 aspect ratio.

With this in mind, most consumer level digicams use a 4:3 aspect ratio for their images.

Sensor Size

The size of the digital sensor element (which is equivalent to the size of the negative for film cameras) is pretty small in all consumer digicams - typically around the size of a fingernail (and a small fingernail at that!).

As I said above, a 35mm film frame is 24mm high by 36mm wide but most digital cameras use sensors very much smaller than this. Here are some typical digicam sensor sizes. The "name" of the sensor is based on specification for old TV tubes used in the 1950s. Nobody is quite sure why it's being used for modern digital sensors since the "sizes" don't really relate in any consistent way to the actual physical size of the sensor. However these names are widely used, so it's best to know what they are. They are often listed in digital camera spec sheets.

Digital Camera Basics - Sensor Size


Relative size of various digital camera sensors

Most of the current small 5MP digital cameras use 1/1.8" sensors which are about 7mm x 5mm. They have an area 25x smaller than 35mm film and about 9.5x smaller than a small sensor digital SLR like the Canon EOS 10D.

You might wonder why sensor size matters and that's a pretty complex issue.

The bottom line is that, for a given pixel count, the larger the sensor (and hence the larger the area of the individual pixels) the better the image quality and the lower the noise level.

While large sensor cameras like the EOS 10D can operate at the equivalent of ISO 3200 (though the image does get noisy), many consumer digicams with small sensors cannot operate above ISO 400 before the noise becomes excessive.

For a full treatment why all this is so, see my article here on photo nettitled SIZE MATTERS

Another factor in quality here is that small sensors tend to be of a different type than large sensors. Small sensors, and the sensors used on all consumer digital cameras, use a scheme which can read the data from the sensor in real time using a scheme called "interline transfer" and the CCD electronics control exposure rather than a mechanical shutter.


Sony NEX-C3 (APS-C Sensor)/Olympus PEN Mini E-PM1 (Micro 43 Sensor),/ Pentax Q (1/2.33 Sensor) The sensor in a digital camera is the electronic version of film, and records light to create a digital image. The size of the sensor determines how much light can be recorded after travelling through the lens of the camera, with a large sensor receiving more light, and a smaller sensor much less.

Large sensors used on more expensive Digital SLRs are often of a different design known as full frame - which doesn't refer to their size, but their design - and which require the use of a mechanical shutter. They don't read out and the display the data in real time, only after the exposure so they can't give real time LCD displays or record video.

The advantage of this scheme is that the whole pixel area can be used to capture light while interline transfer CCDs use part of each pixels to store charge. Since smaller pixel areas generate more noise and interline transfer CCDs are not only smaller to start with but use some of their pixel area for charge storage, their noise level is significantly higher.

So the smaller interline transfer sensors in consumer digital cameras yield lower quality images than those used in higher end DSLRs, they can do more "tricks" like recording video clips and giving a live image display on their LCD screen.

The lack of a mechanical shutter also makes the cameras cheaper and simplifies construction.

Small sensors mean that short focal length lenses are needed to give the same field of view as cameras using larger sensors or 35mm film.

So, for example, a typical consumer digicam may need a 7mm lens to give the same view as you would get using a 35mm focal length lens on a 35mm camera. This has consequences on depth of field and means that most consumer digicams have a vary large depth of field. Great if you want everything in focus, not so great if you want a blurred background. This is covered in detail in my article here titled DIGITAL DEPTH OF FIELD

White Balance

With film you can buy "daylight balanced film" for shooting outdoors or "tungsten balanced film" for shooting indoors under normal domestic lighting (not fluorescents!).

If you use daylight film under tungsten light the images will be very yellow. If you use tungsten film in daylight the images will be very blue. With film you have to correct for the "color temperature" of the light using filters or by the right choice of film.

With digital you can pick your white balance to suit your light source, so that white looks white, not yellow or blue. Normally there is an automatic setting and the camera decides what white balance setting to use.

However if you know what your light source is you can usually set the camera to it and this may give better results. Most digital cameras have settings for sunlight, shade, electronic flash, fluorescent lighting and tungsten lighting. Some have a manual or custom setting where you point the camera at a white card and let the camera figure out what setting to use to make it white.

Sensitivity

Sensitivity settings on digital cameras are the equivalent of ISO ratings on film. Just about every digital camera will have settings with a sensitivity equivalent to ISO 100 film and ISO 200 film.

Many will have an ISO 400 setting, but above that the images from cameras with small sensors gets pretty noisy. The more expensive digital SLRs with much larger sensors have much higher sensitivity settings.

At ISO 400 they are virtually noise free and some can go as high as ISO 3200 or even ISO 6400! Very few cameras have ISO setting lower than ISO 100 because noise levels are so low at ISO 100 there would be no real advantage in a slower setting. Quite a few digital cameras have an "auto" ISO setting, where the camera will pick from ISO 100, ISO 200 and sometimes ISO 400, depending on the light level and the mode in which the camera is operating.

Digital Zoom and Optical Zoom

Most cameras have both optical zoom and digital zoom.

Optical zoom works just like a zoom lens on a film camera. The lens changes focal length and magnification as it is zoomed. Image quality stays high throughout the zoom range.

Digital zoom simply crops the image to a smaller size, then enlarges the cropped portion to fill the frame again. Digital zoom results in a significant loss of quality as is clear from the examples below. It's pretty much a last resort, and if you don't have it in camera, you can do a similar job using almost any image editing program.

Digital Zoom and Optical Zoom


Comparison of optical zoom and digital zoom

JPEG, TIFF and RAW

The size of the digital file corresponding to the image which the camera produces depends on the pixel count.

In most consumer digicams each pixel generates 3 bytes of data (so called "8-bit data"). One for red, one for green and one for blue. This means that a 3MP camera, which has 3 million pixels, generates 9 million bytes of data, or 9MB (megabytes).

A few cameras can generate extra data for extra quality, and some of these cameras generate files which correspond to 2 bytes of data for each color ("16-bit"), so a 3MP camera which is capable of generating 16-bit data will produce an 18MB image file.

Now these files are pretty big and they can be compressed quite a lot without a significant drop in quality.

This is where JPEG (Joint Photo Experts Group) comes in. JPEG is an algorithm designed to work with continuous tone photographic images) which takes image data and compresses it in a lossy manner (this means you do lose some information). The more you compress, the smaller the file but the more information you lose.

However, you can reduce file size by a factor of 10 or so and still get a very high quality image, just about as good as the uncompressed image for most purposes. You can reduce the file size by a factor of 40 - or even more - but the image starts to look really bad!

JPEG Basic Digital Camera Guide - JPEG


On the left, 10:1 JPEG compression. On the Right 40:1 compression.
Uncompressed the image would look virtually identical to the 10:1 JPEG on the left.

With 10:1 compression the 8-bit files generated by a 3MP camera would be 900Kbytes in size rather than 9Mbytes, which is a big saving with little quality loss. The smaller files take up much less storage space and are much faster to send between computers or from the digital camera or memory card to a computer.

There are also lossless ways of saving files using TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) . These keep all the original information, but at the cost of much bigger files. TIFF files can be compressed in a non-lossy way, but they don't get very much smaller. For example, compare the file sizes for the rabbit image above: TIFF files can also be used to save 16-bit data (those these files are twice the size of 8-bit data files), JPEG files can only save 8-bit data.

Uncompressed TIFF  
 Compressed TIFF
 
JPEG at 40:1 compression JPEG at 10:1 compression
176.1 Kbytes  157.6 Kbytes 17.4 Kbytes 4.5 Kbytes

Some cameras offer a third option, that of saving the actual data generated by the sensor in a proprietary format.

Canon calls their version of this "RAW", Nikon call it "NEF". These files are compressed, but in a non-lossy manner. They are significantly smaller than equivalent TIFF files, but larger than JPEGs.

Typically they achieve a compression of around 6:1 using 16-bit data, so files are 1/6 the size of equivalent TIFF files. The only disadvantage of these formats is that the image must be converted to either JPEG or TIFF for most software to be able to display them. The conversion is quite a complex process and can be time consuming if you have a lot of images to convert and a PC that's not very fast.

Since the RAW and NEF formats contain more information than JPEGs (and in fact often more than TIFF files) you can do some degree of exposure compensation during conversion to JPEG to rescue otherwise improperly exposed images. You can also make white balance corrections during conversion, so if you shot with the wrong white balance, you can fix your error.

Display, Printing, DPI and PPI

There's lots of confusion here so I'll try to go slowly!

When you display a digital image on a monitor, the only thing that determines the size of the image is the pixel count and aspect ratio.

DPI and PPI (and I'll explain them later) mean absolutely nothing. If your image is a 480Kbyte file which is 800 pixels wide by 600 pixels wide, it will display as a full screen image if you are using an 800x600 display. It doesn't matter if your DPI is set to 1 or 1000 or if your PPI is set to 1 or 1000. This is 100% true as far as web display goes and as far as any monitor display goes - unless some software intervenes.

For example the IE6 browser will take large images and resize them so they fit on the screen. However DPI and PPI are still ignored. A few advanced page layout programs and advanced image editors may be capable of taking DPI and PPI into account when displaying images.

So I'll say this once again. The way you control how large an image appears on someone's monitor screen when viewing your images on the web is by changing the pixel count.

If your original image is 1600x1200 pixels it will probably be too large to see all at once on 95% of the video monitors out there. It will also be slow to load since it will be a large file.

If you want someone using an 800x600 display to be able to see your image clearly, you need to change the size to, say, 600x400 pixels (remember the browser window is smaller than the full monitor display).

You change image size in software. All image editing programs can do this. Sometimes it's called "downsampling" or "downsizing". See your image processing software manual for details on what options your software offers.

PPI

PPI stands for "Pixels per inch" and is almost exclusively used for printing, not video display.

If you take an image that is 800 pixels wide and 600 pixels high, and you print it with a PPI setting of 100 pixels per inch, the print will be 8 inches wide by 6 inches high.

If you print at 200 PPI you get a print 4" wide by 3" high. Now the print at 200 PPI will be higher in quality but smaller.

Most people seem to agree that around 320 PPI is the highest number you really need. Above that it's very hard to see any improvement in image quality. 240 PPI is often used and even that is often regarded as high quality. Most people notice a quality drop when they go below 180 PPI.

DPI

DPI stands for "dots per inch" and is a property of a printer, not a digital image.

It's a measure of how finely spaced the droplets of ink can be in a print.

However the number is a bit misleading since it's not always measured in the way you think it might be! Printer settings of 360dpi, 720dpi, 1440dpi and 2880dpi are often found.

However the difference between then is subtle at best. Most people probably couldn't tell the difference and 360dpi usually looks great.

Changing DPI does not change the size of the print. PPI controls that. DPI controls print quality (though as I said, over 360dpi you don't see much change).

Memory

There are quite a few different (and incompatible) memory cards used in digital cameras.

Compact Flash (CF) - The original memory card. 42mm x 36mm x 3mm. Somewhat larger than the others, but used on all high end DSLRs. Available in capacities up to 2GB. There are also miniature hard drives (Microdrives) with almost the same form factor as CF cards (CF type II, 5mm thick)) which are available in capacities from 340MB to 4GB. Microdrives used to be cheaper than solid state CF cards, though there is not a big difference today up to about 1GB. The 4GB Microdrives are actually cheaper than the 2GB CF cards though. Of course prices change pretty fast these days! Overall CF cards tend to be cheaper than any of the other forms of solid state memory - though this too could change. CF cards and microdrives contain their own disk controller, so that makes the camera electronics simpler.

Secure Digital (SD) - Very small - about 24mm x 32mm and 2mm thick. They have a built in write protect switch to prevent accidental erasure and certain encryption capabilities of little interest to digital camera owners.

Multimedia - Same size as SD but with less features and no encryption capability. There are some that can be used in some SD cameras but they aren't 100% compatible with SD cards in all applications.

Smart Media - Thinner than CF cards, but lacking an on-card memory controller. Despite the name, they're pretty dumb!

Memory Stick - Introduced by Sony and used only by Sony(?)

XD - Developed and used by Fuji, Olympus and Toshiba - even smaller than SD. 20mm x 25mm by 1.7mm thick

Is there any real difference in performance? No, not really.

The CF cards are the cheapest per megabyte and are available in higher capacity models than the other (of course that may change with time)

Most high end DSLRs use them. The smaller cards tend to be used in the smaller consumer digicams. There's really no reason to pick a camera with one type over another unless you have multiple cameras or other devices (MP3 players for example) which also use memory cards - then it's convenient if they can share cards.

It may also be difficult (and/or expensive) to find really high capacity cards (1GB and up) in formats other than CF, but that's probably not a concern for most digicam users.

The following table gives the approximate number of shots you can expect to get using low JPEG compression using various pixel count cameras in conjunction with various sized memory cards at the lowest ISO speed settings of a typical camera. The exact numbers depend on how much compression the camera applies and the ISO speed used. Higher ISO settings result in more noise and noise is hard to compress and so leads to larger files and less images per card. If you're shooting in a RAW or NEF format you can divide these numbers by 3. If you're shooting TIFF files you'd have to divide these numbers by 8.


Approximate number of shots per memory card for various digital camera pixel counts using high quality JPEGs for storage

Digital Camera Interface

Once you've got the images stored in your camera on the memory card you need a way to get them into your computer! There are several ways to connect digital cameras to a PC as well as external card readers.

Serial - The earliest digital cameras had a serial interface, but no current cameras use this since it is so slow

USB 1.1 - USB was the first widespread high speed method of data transfer from cameras. It is theoretically capable of transfer speeds up to 11 megabits/second (note megabits not megabytes)

USB 2.0 - A development of USB but much faster - up to 480 megabits/second. USB devices are compatible with USB1.1 ports on a PC, but will only work with them at the lower data rate.

IEEE 1394 (Firewire) - Though this is an older interface than USB, it was originally only really used much on Apple computers. It's capable of high speed transfer (400 megabits/second) and it's now found on some PCs or it can be added to them via a plug-in card. More common on digital video cameras than still digital cameras.

Just about all cameras can connect to a PC, but it's sometimes easier to remove the memory card from the camera and insert it into a dedicated card reader. Even if your camera only has USB 1.1. if your computer has a USB 2.0 you can use a USB 2.0 card reader for faster transfer. Card readers are cheap, anywhere from $15 to $40.

Buying a Digital Camera

Sad to say there are more dishonest discount camera stores than you'll find in almost any other business. Some of the popular photography magazines are cram full of ads advertising very low prices.

What they don't tell you is that you won't ever actually get the camera for that price. Either they will add on $75 in shipping charges or they will be "out of stock" on that model, but they will have a more expensive model available of course.

Sometimes they'll tell you that the advertised camera is plastic in made in Taiwan, but for another $50 you can get the model made in Japan.

Sometimes they'll ship you the wrong item in the hope that it will be too much trouble to send it back.

Shop in the ads at the back of magazines based only on the lowest price you see and most of the time you'll be sorry.

However, there are reputable discount dealers and photo.net is associated with a few of them.

These dealers do give photo.net a small commission on sales made through their website via the links below, so please use them if they have what you want at a good price.

They're honest, they stock what they advertise, they have low shipping charges, good prices and responsive customer service. If they didn't we wouldn't be associated with them and we wouldn't recommend shopping with them. BOB ATKINS

About Photo.net: Photo.net is robust, collaborative peer-to-peer educational platform for photographers ranging from hobbyists to professionals. We have created an online community that brings people together and provides lively forums, competitive photo contests, information about the hottest gear, tutorials to help you on your journey, inspirational interviews, and more. Most importantly, we offer the chance to put your photography in front of top rated photographers from all around the world to find out specifically how you can improve. You'll have the opportunity to share your knowledge as well. Teaching, after all, is the best way to learn. By participating in Photo.net and joining this worldwide community, you'll be in good company: the site receives more than 3.6 million visits each month, and more than 4.8 million photographs have been uploaded to the site since its founding more than 20 years ago.


iMORE.COM

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: iSight and FaceTime camera shootout! BY ALLYSON KAZMUCHA Monday, Nov 4, 2013 at 1:36 pm EST

From general photography to low light scenes to macro and back, how does the iPad Air iSight camera compare to the iPhone 5s?

While the iPad Air now has the same, improved front-facing FaceTime HD camera as the iPhone 5s - and every other 2013 iOS device - its rear-facing iSight camera remains very much unchanged from the iPad 4 and original iPad mini.

What has changed however is the software and hardware that power it.

With iOS 7 and the very same Apple A7 found in the iPhone 5s - and the very same image signal processor (ISP) - the iPad Air could see an overall boost in quality anyway.

To measure how it stacks up, we put the 5 megapixel iPad Air camera up against the 8 megapixel camera, not see if it would win - it doesn't have a chance - but to see how close it can come!

iSight camera evolution

The original iPad had no cameras. None.

The iPad 2 had both iSight and FaceTime cameras at VGA resolution, which is only barely better than not having any at all.

The iPad 3 and iPad 4 both had 5 megapixel cameras, but Apple A5X and Apple A6X processors behind them respectively.

Better, but not outstanding. The iPad Air does nothing to improve the glass, so any differences here will come purely down to the A7 chipset.

Keeping it consistent

Unless otherwise specified, I used default settings for every picture, meaning I used the iSight Camera right out of the box. I also did not manually focus on anything, I let the software do all the work and balance images the way it saw it.

I think this gives a better overall picture of how the software and hardware work together. The only thing I did enable on both devices were grid lines to help me try and get the exact same shot each time.

READ MORE...

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: General everyday photography

From left to right: iPad Air, iPhone 5s



When it comes to general everyday photography, I found both the iPad Air and iPhone 5s completely capable of getting the job done.

If you have any recent iPhone, it'll be better than any recent iPad, of course, but some people only have an iPad, or only have an iPad handy when it matters. If that's the case, you won't have any issues with the iPad Air. It manages to balance light better than its predecessors and for the most part, keeps pace with the iPhone 5s fairly well. It's a great example of how software and hardware working together can make a decent different in image quality.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: Macro photography

From left to right: iPad Air, iPhone 5s


For these macro shots, I had nothing enabled and let both the iPad Air and the iPhone 5s focus all on their own.

Overall, both did an amazing job with closeup photography. The one thing that stood out to me was that the iPhone 5s appears to be better at balancing colors.

A good example of this is the photo of the ivy and leaves growing on the brick.

If you take a look at the sidewalk in the lower right, the iPhone 5s did a much better job of showing natural colors.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: HDR photography

From left to right: iPad Air, iPhone 5s





Here only setting I enabled on either camera was high dynamic range (HDR). Every other setting was either disabled or default. Again, I left the iPad Air and iPhone 5s to focus themselves.

Overall, both cameras did a nice job of capturing HDR photos and did a good job balancing light and dark portions.

The iPhone 5s results better captured what was in front of me.

The very last picture may look as if the iPad Air came out ahead but in reality, the shadows produced on the grass by the iPhone 5s were a better approximation of what I was actually looking at.

It's almost as if the iPad Air over-compensated in some areas. Either way, the iPhone 5s came out ahead, but only by a hair.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: Low light photography'

From left to right: iPad Air, iPhone 5s


I didn't have to take very many shots to realize that the iPad Air suffers from a lot of noise in low light conditions.

A lot of noise. This isn't much different than previous generations of iPads. It just doesn't have the same quality sensor the iPhone 5s enjoys, nor does it have an LED Flash to help compensate if it needs to.

But that's the way it is. If you're planning on taking a lot of low light photos, the iPad Air won't be a good go-to camera for you.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: FaceTime camera quality

From left to right: iPad Air, iPhone 5s


Both the iPhone 5s and iPad Air FaceTime cameras struggle in bright light.

In regular lighting conditions however, they both faired pretty well.

The iPhone 5s pulls ahead slightly because it seems to balance skin tones a bit better than the iPad Air. Either way, if you're into selfies, the iPad Air should do an okay job as long as you have normal lighting conditions.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: iSight video quality
https://youtu.be/rjdWTzufJ0o

When it comes to video quality, both the iPhone 5s and iPad Air are capable of shooting in 1080p, and overall, they both do a great job .

The iPhone 5s seems to be quite a bit more sensitive to noise than the iPad Air and I'm not sure if that's a good or a bad thing?

If you need to pick up quieter sounds, the iPhone 5s will fair better. Video quality in general seemed to be on par but the iPhone 5s auto-balances light somewhat better. In normal lighting conditions anyway.

iPad Air vs iPhone 5s cameras: The bottom line

When it comes to everyday photography, you won't be disappointed in the iPad Air. Even the video quality is pretty great.

If low light is important to you, you'll have problems, however. If you don't have an iPhone, another make of camera phone, or even a point-and-shoot camera, you can absolutely get by with an iPad Air. It's not the best camera in mobile, but if it's all you have with you, it's good enough.

If you picked up an iPad Air, let us know what your overall experiences have been with photo and video quality!

iPad Air iPad Air
Apple's full-sized iPad gets slimmed down. Features include:

A7 custom processor

Improved LTE 4G support

FaceTime HD camera

iOS 7 software

Complete review >

Released November, 2013

Alternatives Retina
iPad mini,

iPad 2,

iPad mini (original)

Replacements iPad Air 2 (iPad 6) Fall, 2014

Resources Buyers guide Help forum

iPhone 5s
iPhone 5s Apple's current flagship iPhone with a 4-inch in-cell display, LTE 4G, and BT 4.0 LE. New features include:

Touch ID fingerprint sensor

A7 64-bit processor

M7 motion coprocessor

iSight 120fps video

iOS 7 software

Complete review >

Released September, 2013

Alternatives
iPhone 5c,
iPhone 4s

Replacements
iPhone 6 (rumored) Fall, 2014

Resources
Buyers guide
Help forum


THE AUTHOR: Allyson Kazmucha
Allyson Kazmucha Senior editor for iMore.
I can take apart an iPhone in less than 6 minutes. I also like coffee and Harry Potter more than anyone really should...


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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