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A NEW COMPANY CALLED 'ALPHABET' NOW OWNS GOOGLE


Larry Page, Google co-founder and CEO. JUSTIN SULLIVAN /GETTY IMAGES
GOOGLE HAS REORGANIZED itself into multiple companies, separating its core Internet business from several of its most ambitious projects while continuing to run all of these operations under a new umbrella company called Alphabet.
“What is Alphabet? Alphabet is mostly a collection of companies. The largest of which, of course, is Google,” Google co-founder Larry Page said in a blog post this afternoon. “This newer Google is a bit slimmed down, with the companies that are pretty far afield of our main Internet products contained in Alphabet instead.” In other words, Google will continue to run internet-centric services such as Google Maps, YouTube, Chrome, and Android. But “moonshot” projects such as the X Lab and the Calico life extension project will operate as somewhat separate entities. “Fundamentally, we believe this allows us more management scale, as we can run things independently that aren’t very related. Alphabet is about businesses prospering through strong leaders and independence,” Page wrote. Page will serve as CEO of Alphabet, while Google co-founder Sergey Brin will serve as president. Longtime Page lieutenant Sundar Pichai will take over as Google CEO. READ MORE...

ALSO: Goodbye Google? Search Giant Rebrands As Alphabet


PHNO NOTE: IT'S ACTUALLY ALL ABOUT BUSINESS, BIG BUSINESS, EH! ALL THE BEST TO YOU GUYS, BIG CONGRATULATIONS!! --The company formerly known as Google announced in a filing with the Security and Exchange Commission Monday that it plans to create a new public holding company: Alphabet Inc. The filing explained that the move is meant to reflect its new operating structure. The Google GOOGL -0.18% name will not die. Divisions under the “Google business” will included search, ads, maps, apps, YouTube and Android — essentially the current-Google’s best known businesses. Newer business lines such as aging research division Calico, smart home acquisition Nest, internet provider Fiber and investing arms Google Ventures and Google Capital will be managed under Alphabet. “Our company is operating well today, but we think we can make it cleaner and more accountable. So we are creating a new company, called Alphabet,” wrote Google co-founder and current CEO Larry Page in a post to the official Google blog. Page will become CEO of Alphabet and co-founder Sergey Brin will become president. “What is Alphabet? Alphabet is mostly a collection of companies. The largest of which, of course, is Google. This newer Google is a bit slimmed down, with the companies that are pretty far afield of our main Internet products contained in Alphabet instead.” The goal it seems it to run more nimbly as a collection of smaller companies rather than one behemoth of only loosely related things. Why Alphabet? Page went on to explain: For Sergey and me this is a very exciting new chapter in the life of Google — the birth of Alphabet. We liked the name Alphabet because it means a collection of letters that represent language, one of humanity’s most important innovations, and is the core of how we index with Google search! We also like that it means alpha-bet (Alpha is investment return above benchmark), which we strive for! I should add that we are not intending for this to be a big consumer brand with related products–the whole point is that Alphabet companies should have independence and develop their own brands.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: Alphabet lets Google be more ambitious, more boring and more crazy at the same time
[The company is taking a page out of the playbook of Warren Buffett -- a longtime hero of co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin -- as it prepares for its next stage of growth.]


When Google went public in 2004, co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin titled their letter to potential shareholders "An Owner's Manual" -- an homage to the booklet Warren Buffett, the iconic leader of the conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway, gave to shareholders of his company.
Now, more than 10 years later, Google is taking another page from Buffett's book: a massive restructuring that turns the company into a Berkshire-like empire. Page announced Monday that the leaders of Google will instead become the brain trust of a new parent company, called Alphabet. The new entity will oversee a collection of companies, including Google, as well as more nascent businesses including Nest, its smart-home device company, and Calico, a research company focused on human aging. Berkshire Hathaway runs much the same way: It owns companies like Geico and Dairy Queen and has minority stakes in Coca-Cola and American Express. Scott Devitt, an analyst from the investment bank Stifel, was more explicit when he wrote a note to investors: "The Berkshire Hathaway of the Internet emerges." For Page, the move helps Alphabet make better bets and do so without stretching Google's management team too far from the popular projects like search, mapping and the Gmail email service. "Some of the most fundamental questions which people are not thinking about -- there's the question of how do we organize people, how do we motivate people," Page told the Financial Times in October. In that interview, he was talking about Google's role in reshaping society and public policy. But he might as well have been looking at Google's org chart when he said that, too. (Page also said there's no model for the kind of company Google wants to become, but if there's one person who represents the qualities Google needs as it grows, it's Buffett.) READ MORE...

ALSO: How Google Became Alphabet, From
A to Z


Google said today that it has reorganized itself under a new parent company, Alphabet.
Founded in 1998, Google itself may be known for search, but it has done a whole lot more since then, from building a whole new kind of advertising business to a whole new kind of car. WIRED has followed Google since the beginning. From its roots to the present day, the history of the company formerly known as Google offers hints at where Alphabet might be headed. Once Upon a Time… (2005) The story of how it all began. “We both found each other obnoxious,” Sergey Brin told WIRED of himself and Google co-founder Larry Page. Good vs. Evil (2003) Google is well known for its motto “Don’t be evil,” but WIRED wondered if the company could stay true to its roots as it grew. Life used to be so much easier for Sergey Brin. In the autumn of 1998, he and Larry Page unleashed Google with a clear mission: Help computer users find exactly what they want on the Internet. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

A New Company Called Alphabet Now Owns Google AUTHOR: CADE METZ. CADE METZ BUSINESS DATE OF PUBLICATION: 08.10.15. 08.10.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 5:25 PM. 5:25 PM


Larry Page, Google co-founder and CEO. JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

MANILA, AUGUST 17, 2015  (WIRED.COM) GOOGLE HAS REORGANIZED itself into multiple companies, separating its core Internet business from several of its most ambitious projects while continuing to run all of these operations under a new umbrella company called Alphabet.

“What is Alphabet?

Alphabet is mostly a collection of companies. The largest of which, of course, is Google,” Google co-founder Larry Page said in a blog post this afternoon.

“This newer Google is a bit slimmed down, with the companies that are pretty far afield of our main Internet products contained in Alphabet instead.”

In other words, Google will continue to run internet-centric services such as Google Maps, YouTube, Chrome, and Android. But “moonshot” projects such as the X Lab and the Calico life extension project will operate as somewhat separate entities.

“Fundamentally, we believe this allows us more management scale, as we can run things independently that aren’t very related. Alphabet is about businesses prospering through strong leaders and independence,” Page wrote.

Page will serve as CEO of Alphabet, while Google co-founder Sergey Brin will serve as president. Longtime Page lieutenant Sundar Pichai will take over as Google CEO.

READ MORE...

“In general, our model is to have a strong CEO who runs each business, with Sergey and me in service to them as needed. We will rigorously handle capital allocation and work to make sure each business is executing well. We’ll also make sure we have a great CEO for each business, and we’ll determine their compensation,” Page said.

According to Page’s post, Alphabet will eventually report the earnings of Google separate from the other spinoff companies. According to the company’s SEC filing, Alphabet will eventually replace Google as the publicly traded company on the Nasdaq stock exchange, and all shares of Google will convert to shares of Alphabet. Company shares will continue to trade on the Nasdaq under the same GOOGL and GOOG ticker symbols.


FORBES ONLINE ---(IT'S REALLY ALL ABOUT BUSINESS, BIG BUSINESS! BIG CONGRATULAITONS, ALL THE BEST FOREVER!! - PHNO)

Goodbye Google? Search Giant Rebrands As Alphabet Comment Now Follow Comments

The company formerly known as Google announced in a filing with the Security and Exchange Commission Monday that it plans to create a new public holding company: Alphabet Inc. The filing explained that the move is meant to reflect its new operating structure.

The Google GOOGL -0.18% name will not die. Divisions under the “Google business” will included search, ads, maps, apps, YouTube and Android — essentially the current-Google’s best known businesses. Newer business lines such as aging research division Calico, smart home acquisition Nest, internet provider Fiber and investing arms Google Ventures and Google Capital will be managed under Alphabet.

“Our company is operating well today, but we think we can make it cleaner and more accountable. So we are creating a new company, called Alphabet,” wrote Google co-founder and current CEO Larry Page in a post to the official Google blog. Page will become CEO of Alphabet and co-founder Sergey Brin will become president. “What is Alphabet? Alphabet is mostly a collection of companies. The largest of which, of course, is Google. This newer Google is a bit slimmed down, with the companies that are pretty far afield of our main Internet products contained in Alphabet instead.” The goal it seems it to run more nimbly as a collection of smaller companies rather than one behemoth of only loosely related things.

Why Alphabet? Page went on to explain:

For Sergey and me this is a very exciting new chapter in the life of Google — the birth of Alphabet. We liked the name Alphabet because it means a collection of letters that represent language, one of humanity’s most important innovations, and is the core of how we index with Google search! We also like that it means alpha-bet (Alpha is investment return above benchmark), which we strive for! I should add that we are not intending for this to be a big consumer brand with related products–the whole point is that Alphabet companies should have independence and develop their own brands.”

READ MORE...

Current chairman Eric Schmidt will become the Executive Chairman of Alphabet, Ruth Porat will become the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Alphabet while retaining the same role at Google. Sundar Pichai will become CEO of Google. He is currently senior vice president of products.

Later this year Google shares will automatically convert to Alphabet shares and shareholders will retain the same rights. The company will continue to trade under the tickers GOOGL (for the Class A shares that carry voting rights) and GOOG (Class C shares with no voting rights). Starting in the company’s Q4 earnings report Google financial results will be reported separately from Alphabet as a whole.

Shares popped on the news. By around 5 p.m. the stock was up close to 5.5% from Monday’s closing price of $633.73.


CNET.COM

Alphabet lets Google be more ambitious, more boring and more crazy at the same time August 11, 2015 5:00 AM PDT Richard Nieva mugshot by Richard Nieva @richardjnieva Stephen Shankland mugshot by Stephen Shankland @stshank

[The company is taking a page out of the playbook of Warren Buffett -- a longtime hero of co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin -- as it prepares for its next stage of growth.]

When Google went public in 2004, co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin titled their letter to potential shareholders "An Owner's Manual" -- an homage to the booklet Warren Buffett, the iconic leader of the conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway, gave to shareholders of his company.

Now, more than 10 years later, Google is taking another page from Buffett's book: a massive restructuring that turns the company into a Berkshire-like empire. Page announced Monday that the leaders of Google will instead become the brain trust of a new parent company, called Alphabet.

The new entity will oversee a collection of companies, including Google, as well as more nascent businesses including Nest, its smart-home device company, and Calico, a research company focused on human aging. Berkshire Hathaway runs much the same way: It owns companies like Geico and Dairy Queen and has minority stakes in Coca-Cola and American Express.

Scott Devitt, an analyst from the investment bank Stifel, was more explicit when he wrote a note to investors: "The Berkshire Hathaway of the Internet emerges."

For Page, the move helps Alphabet make better bets and do so without stretching Google's management team too far from the popular projects like search, mapping and the Gmail email service.

"Some of the most fundamental questions which people are not thinking about -- there's the question of how do we organize people, how do we motivate people," Page told the Financial Times in October. In that interview, he was talking about Google's role in reshaping society and public policy. But he might as well have been looking at Google's org chart when he said that, too. (Page also said there's no model for the kind of company Google wants to become, but if there's one person who represents the qualities Google needs as it grows, it's Buffett.)

READ MORE...

Conglomerates are nothing new and are in fact common in media. Viacom, for example, owns MTV, Nickelodeon and Paramount Pictures. But in technology, they're novel.


The restructuring lets Page invest in ambitious tech like Wi-Fi-beaming balloons, while allowing Google to remain profitable.

Google Alphabet gives Page and Brin the room they need to operate while they come up with more out-there projects like driverless cars or Wi-Fi-beaming balloons. It appeases investors who chide Google's big spending and lack of focus, by providing them more clarity on the company's financials.

"The plan is that this new structure will allow for more focus and better incentives to drive the various core and noncore businesses," Ben Schachter, an analyst with Macquarie Securities, wrote in a note to clients.

Page even called out the new company's responsibility to investors in a blog post announcing the new name: "We also like that it means alpha‑bet (Alpha is investment return above benchmark)," he wrote. "Which we strive for!"

A is for ambition

Google's mission may be to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible, but Page has far grander ambitions: He wants to be able to take on just about any industry and fulfill his utopian desire to improve humanity's lot. By comparison, merely fine-tuning Google's successful search business seems like child's play.

By splitting noncore Google projects away from Google, those projects grow from peripheral efforts to standalone entities. They're freed to some extent from the management structure needed to run a 55,000-employee company, gaining a nimbleness that allows for faster innovation. And by putting all of Google's central businesses under Sundar Pichai, one of Page's most trusted lieutenants, the other ventures get his fuller attention.

Along with more independence, though, comes more scrutiny, more accountability and more pressure to perform well on their own. Alphabet won't be able to as easily hide poor financial results under the vast umbrella of search-ad revenue. And Google's strong brand -- No. 2 worldwide after Apple -- won't necessarily benefit Alphabet's non-Google operations.

Still, this seemed to be the way the company was headed. Google already had established Google X to house the company's wilder ideas. And Page in 2014 had promoted Pichai to oversee more of Google's core products so he could devote more attention to other work.

There's no doubt Page is seeking to create a bigger legacy for himself than just good search results, or profitable success such as Apple's. In 2014, he said of his conversations with former Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs, "He would always tell me, 'You're doing too much stuff.' I'd be, like, 'You're not doing enough stuff...If we just do the same things we did before and don't do something new, it seems like a crime to me.'"

In 2013, he was more blunt: "If you're not doing some things that are crazy, then you're doing the wrong things."


WIRED.COM

How Google Became Alphabet, From A to Z ULIA GREENBERG BUSINESS DATE OF PUBLICATION: 08.10.15. 08.10.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 9:45 PM. 9:45 PM

Google said today that it has reorganized itself under a new parent company, Alphabet.

Founded in 1998, Google itself may be known for search, but it has done a whole lot more since then, from building a whole new kind of advertising business to a whole new kind of car.

WIRED has followed Google since the beginning. From its roots to the present day, the history of the company formerly known as Google offers hints at where Alphabet might be headed.

Once Upon a Time… (2005) The story of how it all began. “We both found each other obnoxious,” Sergey Brin told WIRED of himself and Google co-founder Larry Page.


A file picture dated 07 October 2004 shows Google creators Larry Page (L) and Sergey Brin (R) in Frankfurt, Germany. EPA

Good vs. Evil (2003)
Google is well known for its motto “Don’t be evil,” but WIRED wondered if the company could stay true to its roots as it grew.

Life used to be so much easier for Sergey Brin. In the autumn of 1998, he and Larry Page unleashed Google with a clear mission: Help computer users find exactly what they want on the Internet.

READ MORE...

Newbies flocked to the site, grateful for a simple search engine that was both powerful and intuitive. More sophisticated techies came to appreciate Google's computational elegance and its willingness to shun the "portal" model that crammed ecommerce down their throats. Within months, Google became one of the most popular sites on the Web - and not long after that, "Google" became a verb.

Today, Internet users spend about 15 million hours a month on the site. Google.com logs more than 28 million visitors each month, nearly as many as Yahoo! and MSN. Nearly four out of five Internet searches happen on Google or on sites that license its technology. READ MORE

The Complete Guide to: Googlemania! (2004) The world watched as Google went public. “The Google IPO is the rarest kind: one that draws the white-hot glare of public attention,” Marc Andreessen told WIRED. That reminds us of another announcement (cough cough, Alphabet, later......).

Larry and Sergrey named their new search engine Google, for the biggest number they could imagine. But it wasn't big enough. Today Google's a library, an almanac, a settler of bets. It's a parlor game, a dating service, a shopping mall. It's a Microsoft rival. It's a verb.

At more than 200 million requests a day, it is, by far, the world's biggest search engine. And now, on the eve of a very public stock offering, it's cast as savior, a harbinger of rebirth in the Valley. How can it be so many things? It's Goooooooooogle.

Larry Page Lays Out His Plan for Your Future (2014) Page wants to build the future—and he wants you to know it. “Companies are doing the same incremental thing that they did 50 years ago, 20 years ago,” Page explained in a TED talk last year. “That’s not really what we need.” READ MORE...

WIRED Chats With Sundar Pichai (2014)


Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome and Apps at Google. Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

Most recently Google’s senior vice president of product, Pichai will be the new CEO of Google proper. But he made his name as the man in charge of Chrome and Android. “I have a secret project which adds four hours every day to the 24 hours we have,” Pichai joked with us about how he gets everything done. “There’s a bit of time travel involved.”

Google’s Larry Page on Why Moonshots Matter (2013)

Larry Page sat down to chat with WIRED. “If you’re not doing some things that are crazy, then you’re doing the wrong things,” Page said.

Larry Page lives by the gospel of 10x. Most companies would be happy to improve a product by 10 percent. Not the CEO and cofounder of Google. The way Page sees it, a 10 percent improvement means that you’re basically doing the same thing as everybody else. You probably won’t fail spectacularly, but you are guaranteed not to succeed wildly.

That’s why Page expects his employees to create products and services that are 10 times better than the competition. That means he isn’t satisfied with discovering a couple of hidden efficiencies or tweaking code to achieve modest gains. Thousand-percent improvement requires rethinking problems entirely, exploring the edges of what’s technically possible, and having a lot more fun in the process. READ MORE...

Why Google Must Now Rule the Physical World (2014)

Astro Teller runs the quasi-secret Google X research lab. We got some sneak peeks.


Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for TechCrunch

ASTRO TELLER IS the pony-tailed mad scientist leading Google’s efforts to merge the digital world with the physical world. He runs the quasi-secret Google X research lab, where the company is exploring everything from self-driving cars to internet-connected eyewear. These projects may seem like a stretch for a web company that cut its teeth with search and email. But as Teller explained today at an event in San Francisco, Google sees this work as crucial to its future.

“Google is already overflowing with incredibly creative bright groups already working on lots of the software problems of the world,” Teller told hundreds of tech nerds at the O’Reilly Solid Conference in San Francisco, a conference dedicate to the merging of software and hardware. “If we want to help Google become something meaningfully different in the future, then that’s more likely to happen if we focus on the physical world instead.”

But as Teller sees it, Google won’t be as relevant unless it looks to solve problems that mere web services can’t. Clean water won’t happen purely through a new piece of software, he said. Nor will the new ways of storing energy needed to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. “If software’s the only thing in your bag of tools, I’m not going to give you great odds,” he said. READ MORE...

Alphabet’s (née Google’s) Big Bets

Google isn’t just a search engine. The company has developed and acquired a whole host of other ideas and businesses, some of which will now be part of Alphabet instead.

Among them are Nest, self-driving cars, virtual reality, WiFi hubs, a cancer-detecting pill, delivery drones, and a new wireless service.

Alphabet Lets Google Chase Moonshots And Stay Profitable (2015)

By separating the moonshots from Google’s core internet operations, Larry Page can show investors that the company’s bread-and-butter businesses remain highly profitable, even if the moonshots fail to turn a profit for years on end.

GOOGLE IS NOW many Googles.

Company co-founder Larry Page said in a blog post Monday that Google is reorganizing into multiple companies that will sit under a new umbrella operation called Alphabet. Core businesses—Search, YouTube, and Android—will operate semi-separately from Google’s myriad “moonshots,” including the X lab and Page’s various life science projects.

This unexpected transformation shows just how diverse the company has grown since its founding 17 years ago.

Though Google began as a search company, it now dabbles in everything from smartphone operating systems to product-delivery drones to cancer-detecting wristbands.

But the move also underscores that Page and his top lieutenants, including new chief financial officer Ruth Porat, are keen to prevent the moonshots from dragging down the company’s stock price and limiting its ability to attract top talent. READ MORE


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