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MICROSOFT LAUNCHES WINDOWS 10: HERE'S WHAT THAT MEANS


JULY 28 --Windows 10 is coming to PCs and tablets first, but it's also designed to run phones, game consoles and even holographic headsets. AP Photo SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
Microsoft's new Windows 10 operating system debuts Wednesday, as the longtime leader in PC software struggles to carve out a new role in a world where people increasingly rely on smartphones, tablets and information stored online. No one's expected to line up overnight for Windows 10, the way people did 20 years ago for Windows 95. But Microsoft is counting on tens or even hundreds of millions of people to download its latest release for free in the coming months. The launch will be accompanied by a global marketing campaign for an event the company hopes will be pivotal — both for its own future and for a vast audience of computer users around the world. Windows 10 is coming to PCs and tablets first, but it's also designed to run phones, game consoles and even holographic headsets. It has new features, a streamlined Web browser called Edge and a desktop version of Cortana, the online assistant that is Microsoft's answer to Google Now and Apple's Siri. Still, the company insists Windows 10 will seem familiar to users of Windows 7, the six-year-old operating system still running on most PCs. Microsoft and PC makers want to erase the memory of the last big update, 2012's Windows 8, which alienated many with its jarring, unwieldy design. Microsoft skipped the name Windows 9, as if to distance itself further from the last release. While many analysts believe Windows 8 made sagging PC sales even worse, it's unclear if Windows 10 will spur the industry back to growth. Here's a look at the launch and why it matters: READ MORE Q&A.....

ALSO Microsoft unveils Windows 10
Microsoft Windows 10 in 90 seconds


JULY 29 --Microsoft has lifted the curtain much higher on Windows 10, showing off a whole slew of new features that will be coming to PCs and phones later this year. At its Redmond, Washington, headquarters on Wednesday, Microsoft (MSFT, Tech30) detailed how its new operating system will work across desktops, laptops, tablets, smartphones -- oh, and it's going to use holograms. Microsoft understands that Windows 8 wasn't well-received by customers, and most of its updates to Windows 10 reflect that. It offers a much more familiar experience to Windows 7 users who never made the jump to Windows 8. But it also brings some innovations to the PC that tablet and smartphone users have become accustomed to. And by adding holographic representations to Windows 10, Microsoft is hoping to take Windows to a world beyond screens. "Today really is a monumental day for Windows," said Terry Myerson, head of Microsoft's operating systems unit. "Windows 10 is so much more than the latest version of Windows. Windows 10 changes the rules of the game." Like a smartphone or tablet upgrade, Microsoft's new operating system will be available as a free update for anyone using Windows 8.1. That's a big deal for Microsoft, which makes a tremendous amount of money on Windows sales. Windows 10 is Microsoft's first major operating system upgrade since Windows 8 was introduced in 2012. Windows runs on more than 91% of the world's computers, according to NetMarketShare. READ MORE...

ALSO: Microsoft is killing off the Internet Explorer brand
[IE will live on, but only as plumbing for Windows]


MARCH 17 --R.I.P
Microsoft's former Internet Explorer chief left the company in December While Microsoft has dropped hints that the Internet Explorer brand is going away, the software maker has now confirmed that it will use a new name for its upcoming browser successor, codenamed Project Spartan. Speaking at Microsoft Convergence yesterday, Microsoft's marketing chief Chris Capossela revealed that the company is currently working on a new name and brand. "We’re right now researching what the new brand, or the new name, for our browser should be in Windows 10," said Capossela. "We’ll continue to have Internet Explorer, but we’ll also have a new browser called Project Spartan, which is codenamed Project Spartan. We have to name the thing." Internet Explorer will still exist in some versions of Windows 10 mainly for enterprise compatibility, but the new Project Spartan will be named separately and will be the primary way for Windows 10 users to access the web. Microsoft has tried, unsuccessfully, to shake off the negative image of Internet Explorer over the past several years with a series of amusing campaigns mocking Internet Explorer 6. READ MORE....


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Microsoft launches Windows 10: Here's what that means


Windows 10 is coming to PCs and tablets first, but it's also designed to run phones, game consoles and even holographic headsets. AP Photo SAN FRANCISCO (AP)

MANILA, AUGUST 3, 2015  (PHILSTAR) By Brandon Bailey (Associated Press) | Updated July 28, 2015 - Microsoft's new Windows 10 operating system debuts Wednesday, as the longtime leader in PC software struggles to carve out a new role in a world where people increasingly rely on smartphones, tablets and information stored online.

No one's expected to line up overnight for Windows 10, the way people did 20 years ago for Windows 95. But Microsoft is counting on tens or even hundreds of millions of people to download its latest release for free in the coming months. The launch will be accompanied by a global marketing campaign for an event the company hopes will be pivotal — both for its own future and for a vast audience of computer users around the world.

Windows 10 is coming to PCs and tablets first, but it's also designed to run phones, game consoles and even holographic headsets. It has new features, a streamlined Web browser called Edge and a desktop version of Cortana, the online assistant that is Microsoft's answer to Google Now and Apple's Siri.

Still, the company insists Windows 10 will seem familiar to users of Windows 7, the six-year-old operating system still running on most PCs. Microsoft and PC makers want to erase the memory of the last big update, 2012's Windows 8, which alienated many with its jarring, unwieldy design.

Microsoft skipped the name Windows 9, as if to distance itself further from the last release. While many analysts believe Windows 8 made sagging PC sales even worse, it's unclear if Windows 10 will spur the industry back to growth.

Here's a look at the launch and why it matters:

READ MORE...

Q: What happens this week?

A: Microsoft plans promotional events in several cities Wednesday, tied to a global ad campaign and a series of charitable donations.

About 5 million people who enrolled in an earlier test program will be able to download Windows 10 right away.

The company is also offering Windows 10 as a free download, any time over the next year, to anyone who has the Home or Pro versions of Windows 7 or 8 (but not the Enterprise versions used by big organizations).

Some may not get it the first day; Microsoft says it will deliver downloads in waves, to ensure things go smoothly, but it hasn't said how long that will take. Details on how to upgrade are here: http://bit.ly/1eNCySl  .

Retailers such as Best Buy, Staples and Wal-Mart will have some desktops and laptops with Windows 10 already installed. More models are coming.

Q: Why is Microsoft giving Windows 10 for free?

A: The company wants to get the new software on as many devices as possible. Microsoft needs a large pool of users to convince independent programmers that it's worth their time to build useful or entertaining apps for Windows 10 devices. Executives also believe that if people are exposed to the latest and best Windows, they're more likely to try other Microsoft products on PCs and mobile devices.

CEO Satya Nadella says he wants to have 1 billion devices running Windows 10 in three years. Microsoft estimates there are 1.5 billion people who currently use some kind of Windows. Rather than charging them to upgrade, as Microsoft used to do, it's embracing the free download model pioneered by Apple and Google.

Q: How will Microsoft make money?

A: Microsoft will still collect licensing fees from PC makers that install Windows 10 on new machines. In recent years, most consumers have waited until they bought a new computer to get the latest Windows. Microsoft also makes money from selling Windows and other software to large businesses and organizations.

In addition, Microsoft is counting on Windows 10 to spur more use of other services. Microsoft makes money from selling advertising for its Bing search engine, and Windows 10 comes with many apps that steer people to Bing. The company also collects fees from people who use premium versions of its Office software, OneDrive cloud storage and Skype.

Q: Why does this matter to consumers?

A: Microsoft says Windows 10 is designed for the way people use computers today — with a faster Web browser and features that make it easier to start tasks on a PC and then switch to a hand-held device. (Apple and Google tout similar features in their software.)

Windows 10 also lets users log in with their face, iris or thumbprint, instead of remembering passwords, though this works only with computers equipped with the right hardware.

Most PC users are still working with Windows 7, thanks to Windows 8's unpopularity. But Microsoft plans to phase out maintenance and security support for Windows 7 over the next five years, and for Windows 8 by 2023, as it did with the older Windows XP. Still, there's no need to panic about upgrading right away.

Q: Why is it important to the tech industry?

A: The growth in mobile devices has caused PC sales to decline for more than three years, hurting manufacturers like Hewlett-Packard and companies like Microsoft and Intel, whose products are used with PCs.

Windows 10 won't make people give up their hand-held gadgets, but it's part of Nadella's strategy to reposition Microsoft for a world where people use multiple devices. PC makers are hoping he succeeds.

Jeff Barney, who runs Toshiba's consumer PC business, said the new software is easier to use than Windows 8 and will complement hardware advances in Toshiba's newest machines.

Although Barney isn't expecting a big rush to stores Wednesday, "over time, I think we're going to see a positive trend in sales."


Microsoft unveils Windows 10
MS Windows 10 in 90 seconds
By David Goldman @DavidGoldmanCNN

Microsoft has lifted the curtain much higher on Windows 10, showing off a whole slew of new features that will be coming to PCs and phones later this year.

At its Redmond, Washington, headquarters on Wednesday, Microsoft (MSFT, Tech30) detailed how its new operating system will work across desktops, laptops, tablets, smartphones -- oh, and it's going to use holograms.

Microsoft understands that Windows 8 wasn't well-received by customers, and most of its updates to Windows 10 reflect that. It offers a much more familiar experience to Windows 7 users who never made the jump to Windows 8.

But it also brings some innovations to the PC that tablet and smartphone users have become accustomed to. And by adding holographic representations to Windows 10, Microsoft is hoping to take Windows to a world beyond screens.

"Today really is a monumental day for Windows," said Terry Myerson, head of Microsoft's operating systems unit. "Windows 10 is so much more than the latest version of Windows. Windows 10 changes the rules of the game."

Like a smartphone or tablet upgrade, Microsoft's new operating system will be available as a free update for anyone using Windows 8.1. That's a big deal for Microsoft, which makes a tremendous amount of money on Windows sales.

Windows 10 is Microsoft's first major operating system upgrade since Windows 8 was introduced in 2012. Windows runs on more than 91% of the world's computers, according to NetMarketShare.

Live blog: Get up-to-the-minute details about Windows 10

Holograms

By far the coolest part of Microsoft's presentation was "Windows Holographic," Microsoft's attempt to immerse its customers into a computerized world. Windows 10 has been built to integrate holographic representations of its software.

With the companion HoloLens glasses, Windows 10 users can interact with holograms all around them.

HoloLens comes with a holographic processing chip that understands your gestures, voice and where you're looking. It can map the world around you and display holograms that appear to be in thin air or on objects that surround you.


A depiction of a Microsoft HoloLens user navigating Windows Holographic, with an application window on the left, and the Holographic Start menu on the right.

With Windows 10's HoloStudio app, Microsoft lets users create 3-D objects with their voices and gestures (like pinches and flicks) and then print them on a 3-D printer.

Cortana

Microsoft's version of Siri will be part of Windows 10. By using voice commands, Cortana can show your notifications, stock information, sports news, and other functions typical of smartphone voice assistants.



But you can also say "Hey, Cortana, show me PowerPoint slides about the charity auction" or "show me photos from December," and it will quickly run the search query.

No more Internet Explorer

Microsoft introduced a new, stripped-down browser that has been codenamed "Project Spartan."

The new browser will ship with Windows 10, and it will function similarly to Chrome and Firefox.


Spartan will not be available on Windows 7 through Microsoft If you want the latest, you'll need to upgrade

The Spartan browser supports pen interactions, so people can mark up websites with their fingers or styluses and share them. Wit also features a reading mode and Cortana integration.

READ MORE...

Spartan will be built on a different software platform from IE and the two are not compatible. That means Microsoft will continue to also ship IE with Windows to ensure that corporate apps continue to function properly.

Return of the Start menu

After being removed from Windows 8, Microsoft announced that the Start Menu will make a full comeback in Windows 10.

The new Windows 10 Start menu includes a new personalizable space for favorite apps, programs and websites. It can be viewed as a full-screen Windows 8-like display of tiles or a more familiar Windows 7-like drawer of apps.

Continuum

The biggest Windows 8 headache that Windows 10 is expected to cure is the way the operating system manages its separate "desktop" and "tablet" modes.

At its event, Microsoft introduced a new Windows 10 design interface called "Continuum."


Continuum is one of the latest efforts to smooth the OS's transition from an on OS only for desktops and laptops to one that adds tablet use to its repertoire. You tap the message box, the display will switch to this view.

Windows 10 sticks to desktop mode when it recognizes a mouse and keyboard and tablet mode when there is no keyboard and mouse.

But hybrid devices, such as the Microsoft Surface, will be able to transition seamlessly between the two modes. Pull off the keyboard, and you'll enter tablet mode. Snap the keyboard back on, and you're back in desktop mode.

One Windows for all your devices

There are currently three different versions of Windows: Windows 8.1, Windows RT for tablets and Windows Phone.

Last year, CEO Satya Nadella said Microsoft planned to scaling back.

Windows RT and Windows Phone are just becoming Windows 10.

Windows 10 phones will be able to live-sync with Windows 10 PCs, and the apps will function similarly across different devices. They'll still be incompatible with most traditional Windows software, but they'll be able to run all of the apps from the Microsoft store.

Xbox

Microsoft said the new Xbox app for Windows 10 will let gamers stream and play Xbox games on their PCs. They can also play games from the Steam video game network and save and share game-play clips.

A new look for Windows

Microsoft said that Windows Store apps and regular desktop programs will both run in traditional windows in Windows 10. The programs can be resized and minimized from the bar at the top.

Windows 10 will feature something Mac users have enjoyed for years: the ability to create new desktops and quickly switch between them.

The new "Snap" feature will allow Windows 10 users to work on up to four apps at once on the same screen.


In general As you may know, Snap is a windows management feature that allows you to arrange open windows, including maximizing and resizing, just by dragging and dropping a window to different edges of the screen. When a window is dragged to the correct position, a ripple effect will emanate from the cursor, and you'll see an animated transparent outline of the window instantly appear in its new position. As soon as you release the mouse button, the window will snap to that position.

Snap has been around since Windows Vista, but Microsoft redesigned it for Windows 10 to include a new quadrant layout.

And a new button on the task bar will take you straight to a single screen that displays all your open apps and files.


Microsoft is killing off the Internet Explorer brand
IE will live on, but only as plumbing for Windows
By Tom Warren on March 17, 2015 06:47 am @tomwarren 285 Share on Facebook (66k) Tweet (9,184) Share (1,935) Pin


R.I.P Microsoft's former Internet Explorer chief left the company in December

While Microsoft has dropped hints that the Internet Explorer brand is going away, the software maker has now confirmed that it will use a new name for its upcoming browser successor, codenamed Project Spartan.

Speaking at Microsoft Convergence yesterday, Microsoft's marketing chief Chris Capossela revealed that the company is currently working on a new name and brand.

"We’re right now researching what the new brand, or the new name, for our browser should be in Windows 10," said Capossela.

"We’ll continue to have Internet Explorer, but we’ll also have a new browser called Project Spartan, which is codenamed Project Spartan. We have to name the thing."

Internet Explorer will still exist in some versions of Windows 10 mainly for enterprise compatibility, but the new Project Spartan will be named separately and will be the primary way for Windows 10 users to access the web.

Microsoft has tried, unsuccessfully, to shake off the negative image of Internet Explorer over the past several years with a series of amusing campaigns mocking Internet Explorer 6.

READ MORE...

The ads didn't improve the situation, and Microsoft's former Internet Explorer chief left the company in December, signalling a new era for the browser.

THE INTERNET EXPLORER WILL LIKELY
HAVE MICROSOFT IN THE NAME

Capossela also detailed the power of using the Microsoft brand over just Windows or Internet Explorer, and showed off some research data on a new name for the company’s browser vs. Internet Explorer.

Putting Microsoft in front of the new secret name increased the appeal to some Chrome users in the UK. "Just by putting the Microsoft name in front of it, the delta for Chrome users on appeal is incredibly high," says Capossela.

MS chrome data Microsoft is clearly testing names with market research, but it’s unclear when the company plans to unveil the final name for its Internet Explorer successor.

Judging by Microsoft’s own research, it’s obvious the company will move as far away from Internet Explorer as possible, and it’s likely Project Spartan will have the Microsoft name attached to it.

Elsewhere in Capossela’s talk, the Microsoft executive also discussed the ways the company will make money in future, and clever ways the company is making use of social media.

Microsoft has started to use artists to respond to Twitter users with personalised images, and at least one from the Xbox team was successful at creating attention with an impressive 35,000 retweets.

It’s all part of improving Microsoft’s brand perception, and a general admission from the company that it’s ready to be loved again.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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