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SIX FACTS ABOUT THE MOBILE LIFE


When was the last time you checked your mobile phone? At least 150 times a day, if we go by findings of a study done on users by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 2013. That’s about six times per hour or once every 10 minutes.
It’s gotta be love. The world’s fascination with mobile devices was once again dissected at the two-day “Mobile Manila Summit 2015” recently. While the conference targeted marketers and digital strategists who need to push brands and advocacies into the mobile realm, there are some key takeaways for consumers who want a peak into what mobile life’s really like now. “With a smartphone, people don’t go online anymore, we live online,” Ken Lingan, Google Philippines country manager, quipped in his presentation. Here are at least six truths about the mobile lifestyle: CONTINUE READING...


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Six facts about the mobile life


Yee Mei Chan, regional director of business transformation, Millard Brown, discusses the mobile landscape in Asia-Pacific at the recently concluded Mobile Summit Manila 2015.

MANILA, JULY 23, 2015  (PHILSTAR) By Eden E. Estopace - When was the last time you checked your mobile phone?

At least 150 times a day, if we go by findings of a study done on users by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 2013. That’s about six times per hour or once every 10 minutes.

It’s gotta be love.

The world’s fascination with mobile devices was once again dissected at the two-day “Mobile Manila Summit 2015” recently.

While the conference targeted marketers and digital strategists who need to push brands and advocacies into the mobile realm, there are some key takeaways for consumers who want a peak into what mobile life’s really like now.

“With a smartphone, people don’t go online anymore, we live online,” Ken Lingan, Google Philippines country manager, quipped in his presentation.

Here are at least six truths about the mobile lifestyle:

CONTINUE READING...

1. Smartphone is the primary device or gateway to the Internet.

People who first experienced accessing the Internet via desktops and laptops are getting smaller. Lingan says that based on the Google Consumer Barometer Study for first half of 2015, of the 50 million Filipinos online, 61 percent reported that smartphones are their primary device to access the Internet.

“Imagine using the Internet through the small screen anytime, anywhere,” he says. That’s what the mobile life is like.

The Google Philippines chief says that the key drivers to the mobile first revolution include a growing middle class.

Business Process Outsourcing (BPOs) firms now employ about a million workers generating US$18 billion in revenues per year, which makes it a massive driver for domestic consumption and enables more people to afford data connectivity.

Telecommunication companies are also promoting sachet marketing in a big way. For as low P5, one can have 15 minutes of video, making it easier for people to access the Internet through mobile.

Lastly, he says, since 2009, the price of mobile devices has gone down by as much as 30 percent.

2. Mobile is about data and connectivity.

The Philippines is not unique in its mobile preference. The mobile landscape in the Asia-Pacific region shares this characteristic.

Yee Mei Chan, Millard Brown regional director of business transformation, says that worldwide, the Internet is accessed by 65 percent of users on desktop and only 35 percent on mobile.

However, in Asia-Pacific, 50 percent of the population access the Internet through mobile devices.

“Mobile growth is not just about voice and text but more excitingly, about data and connectivity,” she says.

Indeed, what good is having a cellphone that is offline?

When we say mobile, we hardly think calling and texting anymore.

We think Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, chat apps and the whole ecosystem of sharing our personal lives online.

3. Millennials lead the mobile charge.

Much has been said about the Millennial Generation (15-35 years old) and how they are leading the adoption of the mobile lifestyle.

Stuart Jamieson, managing director of Nielsen, says that Millennials now comprise about 35 per cent of the population, while their much younger, and perhaps more tech-savvy siblings, the Generation Z (14 years old and below) comprise 31 percent.

Together, these young people corner the bulk of our population pyramid.

Needless to say, the mobile generation is here to stay. These are people who are almost always connected and can’t live without their phones.

Among younger millennials (15-26 years old), Jamieson says 35 percent own a smartphone and four per cent own a tablet, while among older millennials (27-35 years old),37 percent own a smartphone and six per cent own a tablet.

4. Mobile is not the only screen.

“While mobile may be most loved, it is not the only screen people engage with,” says Chan, citing a Millard Brown study in 30 countries among more than 12,000 consumers that finds the average person accessing the Internet on multiple screens.

Millard Brown defines multiscreen users as those 16-45 years old who own or have access to both TV and either a smartphone or tablet.

“In Asia, consumers interact more with many screens than their counterparts in the rest of the world,” she says.”

"The Philippines and Indonesia have the highest multiscreen usage among countries.”

Among others, multiscreen usage means people watching TV while also playing on their phone or keeping busy on their laptop.

According to the study, people use the second screen to search for more information on they saw on TV, or interact with a TV show to discuss what they were watching via social media.

“More interestingly, we have a concept called meshing – consumers will interact not just on different screens but on related content,” she adds. Meshed screen time is higher in Asia-Pacific than globally, with the Philippines and Thailand being most open to multiscreen usage and to receiving related content.

5. FOBO and FOMO are real.

If you haven’t heard of these acronyms before, FOBO means Fear of Being Offline and FOMO means Fear of Missing Out.

“These two things have become the same for them (Millennials),” Swati Rai, client partner, APAC, Facebook Atlas. “Being offline means missing out. I know teenagers who would rather get an update of their data plan back in Delhi than buy a nice meal for themselves because being connected is so important to them.”

And they are moving from one screen to five, and are spending more than half the day in the connected space.

6. Mobile is a behavior, not a technology.

“Mobile is disrupting the way we travel and the way we shop,” says Lingan.

“Two-thirds of Filipinos do online research first before making a purchase. Mobile queries (on Google Search) have grown 2.5 times, while mobile watch time on YouTube has grown seven times. With this fundamental shift in behavior, I think we also need to reshape the way we engage the consumer.”

And speaking of the mobile user as consumer, we are all very much a product of our times. We use Waze to help us navigate the roads, we use Grab Taxi, Easy Taxi or Uber to hail a cab, (in some parts of the world) we use mobile to pay for online purchases, among others.

Rohit Dadwal, managing director of MMA Asia-Pacific, says this has led to the rise of unusual companies that rule our lives: Uber (the world’s largest taxi company that owns no vehicles), Facebook (the world’s most popular media company that creates no content), Airbnb (the world’s largest accommodation provider that owns no real estate), and Alibaba (the most valuable retailer with no inventory.)

“Technology and consumer behavior will keep changing,” says Rai. And as a portent of things to come, Facebook is launching Occulus Rift in 2016.

“All of us working in the digital space need to understand that technology is going to change,” says Rai. “If you are not part of the steamroller, you are the road.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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