PHNO SCIENCE & INFOTECH NEWS
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports)

HAND GRIP IS TELLTALE OF HEART'S HEALTH - STUDY


PARIS
, FRANCE,
 –Testing people’s hand strength could be a simple, low-cost way to screen them for the risk of heart attack or stroke, The Lancet reported on Thursday. Canadian-led researchers carried out a large-scale probe into evidence that a firm hand grip is a rough yet reliable indicator of good health. Their study covered nearly 140,000 patients aged between 35 and 70 in 17 countries, whose health was monitored over four years. During checkups, the patients were asked to grasp a gadget called a Jamar dynamometer, which measures muscle strength. Every five-kilogram (11-pound) decline in grip strength was linked to a 16-percent increase in the risk of death from any cause over the study’s four years. The decline was also associated with a seven-percent increased risk of a heart attack, and a nine-percent increased risk of a stroke. Hand grip is a stronger forecaster of early death than systolic blood pressure, the study found. The results were the same when factors such as age, tobacco and alcohol use, education level and employment status, which affect health, were taken into account. READ MORE...

ALSO: Changing public attitudes toward heart disease prevention


http://flehd.org.ph/profile.html  Each year, hundreds of thousands experience a heart attack, and nearly half of them are fatal. Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the second leading cause of death in the country. Foundation for Lay Education on Heart Diseases (FLEHD) founder and president Dr. Adolfo Bellosillo said: “Many people tend to think that breakthroughs in medicine—new drugs or latest high-tech surgical procedures—are the answer. But despite the medical and surgical advances, 60 percent of deaths occur suddenly and among the survivors, 30 percent die while in the hospital and the recurrence rate of heart attack remains high. They have a hard time believing that the simple choices that we make in our lifestyle—what we eat, how much exercise we get, how we respond to stress, whether or not we smoke cigarettes—can be as powerful as or even better than drugs and surgery.” FLEHD is an organization that primarily focuses on educating the Filipino community with regard to heart and related diseases. Bellosillo, who also heads the Makati Medical Center’s Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Cardiology Unit, recently launched a book chronicling the first 13 years of the foundation since its inception in September 1999. READ MORE...

Healthy lifestyle best way to avoid heart, other ailments


MORE than 85 per cent of patients with heart failure will gradually worsen and die within five years, said a consultant cardiologist from Gleneagles JPMC. Speaking at a heart disease event, Dr Thirunavukkarasu Ganesan yesterday told Ministry of Defence (MinDef) personnel that “prevention is the most valuable option” as the majority of heart failure patients will experience deteriorating health despite optimum medical care. He said a healthy lifestyle will help to reduce the risk factors of a heart attack including high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. The consultant cardiologist, who is also director of non-invasive cardiology, recommended eating healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and poultry. He added that fish should be consumed twice a week as a “delicious way to help your cholesterol levels”. “Enjoy at least 45 to 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Brisk walk, cycling, swimming, jogging, dance – whatever you love to do, do it,” he said. In order to maintain a healthy lifestyle, Dr Ganesan explained that physical activities should be undertaken frequently and consistently. He also advised the audience to quit smoking and avoid exposure to second-hand smoke. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Hand grip is telltale of heart’s health—study

PARIS, FRANCE, MAY 18, 2015 (INQUIRER) Agence France-Presse 10:17 AM | Thursday, May 14th, 2015 –Testing people’s hand strength could be a simple, low-cost way to screen them for the risk of heart attack or stroke, The Lancet reported on Thursday.

Canadian-led researchers carried out a large-scale probe into evidence that a firm hand grip is a rough yet reliable indicator of good health.

Their study covered nearly 140,000 patients aged between 35 and 70 in 17 countries, whose health was monitored over four years.

During checkups, the patients were asked to grasp a gadget called a Jamar dynamometer, which measures muscle strength.

Every five-kilogram (11-pound) decline in grip strength was linked to a 16-percent increase in the risk of death from any cause over the study’s four years.

The decline was also associated with a seven-percent increased risk of a heart attack, and a nine-percent increased risk of a stroke.

Hand grip is a stronger forecaster of early death than systolic blood pressure, the study found.

The results were the same when factors such as age, tobacco and alcohol use, education level and employment status, which affect health, were taken into account.

READ MORE...
There was no link, though, between grip strength and diabetes, respiratory disease, injuries from falls or fractures.

“Grip strength could be an easy and inexpensive test to assess an individual’s risk of death and cardiovascular disease,” said Darryl Leong, an assistant professor of medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, who led the investigation.

“Doctors or other healthcare professionals can measure grip strength to identify patients with major illnesses such as heart failure who are at particularly high risk of dying from their illness.”

More work is needed to calibrate hand grip, as the strength can depend on the individual’s size, weight and ethnicity.

Research, too, is needed to understand why muscle strength seems to be a telltale of health — and whether the risk of death and cardiovascular disease could be eased by improving muscle tone.


INQUIRER

Changing public attitudes toward heart disease prevention Charles E. Buban @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:02 AM | Saturday, March 28th, 2015


http://flehd.org.ph/profile.html

Each year, hundreds of thousands experience a heart attack, and nearly half of them are fatal. Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the second leading cause of death in the country.

Foundation for Lay Education on Heart Diseases (FLEHD) founder and president Dr. Adolfo Bellosillo said: “Many people tend to think that breakthroughs in medicine—new drugs or latest high-tech surgical procedures—are the answer. But despite the medical and surgical advances, 60 percent of deaths occur suddenly and among the survivors, 30 percent die while in the hospital and the recurrence rate of heart attack remains high. They have a hard time believing that the simple choices that we make in our lifestyle—what we eat, how much exercise we get, how we respond to stress, whether or not we smoke cigarettes—can be as powerful as or even better than drugs and surgery.” FLEHD is an organization that primarily focuses on educating the Filipino community with regard to heart and related diseases.

Bellosillo, who also heads the Makati Medical Center’s Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Cardiology Unit, recently launched a book chronicling the first 13 years of the foundation since its inception in September 1999.

READ MORE...
“Through the support of the board of formidable trustees chaired by Jose Concepcion and with Ms Marixi Rufino-Prieto, Ms Imelda Cojuangco, Ms Nellie Bengzon, Dr. Alberto Romulo, Johnny Litton, Ms Zenaida Tantoco, Dr. Norbert Lingling Uy and me as members (also included were Enrique Sobrepeña who resigned and Ms Chito Madrigal Collantes who passed away), FLEHD was able to conduct more than 400 educational programs—in various formats—nationwide,” said Bellosillo during the book launch held at the Makati Medical Center auditorium (8th floor of Tower 2) last Monday.

Educational programs

The educational programs the foundation has initiated include: public health forum for the general population with topics like “Know your heart and how it works,”

“How do I know I am having a heart attack?” and “Sex and the Heart: Fact and Fiction” presented in layman’s terms; barangay health workers workshop, which was conceived to enrich basic knowledge of barangay health workers on matters pertaining to heart and cardiovascular system; senior citizens seminar; annual national convention on preventive cardiology for physicians; annual regional assembly on preventive cardiology, which is designed for physicians who find it difficult to come to Manila to attend the national convention; and annual oratorical contest, which is held to create awareness among medical students all over the country on the importance of preventive cardiology as a big factor in reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity.

Other educational programs are: healthcare professionals in government service, which is designed for the provincial, city and municipal health officers, including their nurses, midwives, nutritionists and dieticians; public school teachers seminars; preventive cardiology seminars for nurses; “How to Remain Young at Heart: The Musical” presentations, which merged medical lecture with music and dance; publication of a primer on coronary artery disease, which contains most of the pieces of information used during FLEHD forums, seminars, assemblies, etc. and has been translated into various dialects namely: Tagalog, Ilonggo, Cebuano, Ilocano, Pangalatok, and Pampangueño.

Bellosillo explained: “I should thank the FLEHD faculty who are volunteer doctors gifted with thorough knowledge of heart diseases and effective communication skills. What we have proved in all our initiatives is that changing lifestyle could prevent at least 90 percent of all heart disease, and likely even more. Thus, the disease that accounts for more premature deaths and costs Filipinos more than any other illness is almost completely preventable, and even reversible, simply by changing lifestyle.”

He added: “If FLEHD continues to address the underlying causes of chronic diseases, which are largely dependent on lifestyle changes, and provide incentives for healthy ways of living, we can create a new model of medicine that is more caring and compassionate, and that is also more cost-effective and competent.”


INQUIRER

Healthy lifestyle best way to avoid heart, other ailments The Brunei Times / Asia News Network 10:17 AM | Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

MORE than 85 per cent of patients with heart failure will gradually worsen and die within five years, said a consultant cardiologist from Gleneagles JPMC.

Speaking at a heart disease event, Dr Thirunavukkarasu Ganesan yesterday told Ministry of Defence (MinDef) personnel that “prevention is the most valuable option” as the majority of heart failure patients will experience deteriorating health despite optimum medical care.

He said a healthy lifestyle will help to reduce the risk factors of a heart attack including high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure.

The consultant cardiologist, who is also director of non-invasive cardiology, recommended eating healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and poultry. He added that fish should be consumed twice a week as a “delicious way to help your cholesterol levels”.

“Enjoy at least 45 to 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Brisk walk, cycling, swimming, jogging, dance – whatever you love to do, do it,” he said.

In order to maintain a healthy lifestyle, Dr Ganesan explained that physical activities should be undertaken frequently and consistently. He also advised the audience to quit smoking and avoid exposure to second-hand smoke.

READ MORE...
“Check for other risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, unduly stressful lifestyle, overweight and obesity. Pay attention to correct them,” he said.

He further pointed out that preventing heart disease is a shared responsibility between families and schools as well as other educational institutions. A healthy lifestyle, he stressed, should be developed from childhood with regular exercise and healthy habits.

“Each one of us should live and lead by example so that we become the winners in the fight against heart disease,” said the consultant cardiologist.

Held at the Bridex Conference Hall in Jerudong, the event aimed to raise awareness about heart disease in conjunction with World Health Day. It also featured a talk on a heart healthy diet by Gleneagles JPMC dietitian Nor Arfah Mohd Taib as well as a health exhibition and free health checks.

In attendance was Permanent Secretary Datin Paduka Hjh Suriyah Hj Umar as the guest of honour together with other senior defence officials as well as civilian and military personnel.

Heart disease is the second leading cause of death behind cancer in Brunei with an estimated 7,000 patients suffering from heart failure. A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to the heart is blocked, causing damage and death of the heart muscle.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE