YOUTH FINED $2,000 FOR SPREADING MALICIOUS NEWS ON FACEBOOK 

A 23-year-old youth was fined RM 7,000 (about $2,000) or four months’ jail for spreading malicious news via Facebook last August. Muhammad Nur Hafiz Palpha, an Internet installation company employee pleaded guilty before Sessions judge Surita Budin to committing the offense through his Facebook account, “Ringgo Pandan.” He had posted a statement about some teenagers being killed while returning from prayers near Pandamaran in Klang. According to the facts presented by deputy public prosecutor Rosidah Abu Bakar, a policeman based at the Pandamaran police station noticed the malicious posting at 8:15 a.m. on August 1. The policeman lodged a report after verifying that the statement was uncorroborated, and investigations conducted by the Royal Malaysian Police’s Cyber Unit led to Muhammad Nur Hafiz’s mobile phone registration number and location. He was arrested at No. 7, Lorong D10, Kampung Pandan, Kuala Lumpur on August 7. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Why I do not use Facebook (anymore)

I first used Facebook in 2009 when it was still cool to be perpetually online, to post silly faces and pictures of lunches (or brunches), and when nonsensical photos could garner as much as 30 “likes” upon upload. What a time that was. Well, it’s been five years, and it’s getting a tad annoying. For one, I cannot but cringe at the fact that people kept sending me game notifications (even I thought that was so last year), until Facebook caught that drift and these transformed into those pesky application invites. Then there were the perpetual online love quarrels, and those cryptic one-liners that this new breed of romantics somehow keep shoving onto other people’s faces. Apparently, to tag another person to a very superficial music video about love and fun and all that jazz is all one needs to do to express a voracious, passionate love affair that the world must know about. And don’t get me started about selfies, hashtags, and every other fad that people follow simply because they can. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Fast Food for the Mind: Why I Don't Have a Facebook or Twitter Account

-----Through social media interactions via online venues like Facebook and Twitter, our society today is overrun in the same way with “fast food for the mind.” Just as our bodies can tolerate only so much unhealthy food, our minds equally have a certain cognitive bandwidth. But instead of spending our bandwidth on deeper thoughts, we often sacrifice it for the instant gratification and distraction of the mind offered by myriad online venues. Most things that we value in our society – great paintings, music, books, poems, technologies, or architecture – are results of deep thoughtfulness. As we benefit in some ways from deep thoughtfulness and intellect of other great minds, they help us find a broader meaning in life. The more time we spend as a society on the trivial distractions, the less we have to invest in connecting with our true self and potential. EAD FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Why Does Using Facebook Feel So Good?
Research reveals that the social network arouses fundamental human strivings. 

At a party a few years ago, a friend turned to me and in all seriousness stated that he would rather be at home on Facebook than catching up with some of his closest friends offline. Since I hadn't signed up for the network yet, I had no idea what he was talking about. He nearly burst as he raved about “Liking” and “Poking” (remember that feature?). But he was on to something. Despite its further technologizing our experience, two new studies have found that the social network satisfies basic human desires, both body and soul. According to recent research, Facebook literally makes us feel good. In a study published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Mauri et al. (2011) found that the network may owe some of its success to the positive state it conjures up in its users. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Why the future of Facebook is (almost) all about your smartphone 

10 steps to understanding how mobile is now the driving force behind the world’s biggest social network
Facebook started life as a website, but in 2014 it is mobile devices driving its growth. Mobile is the dominant influence on pretty much every new feature the social network launches. Even back in October 2012, the chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, was telling analysts that “today there’s no argument: Facebook is a mobile company”. Fast forward to the end of March 2014, and that company had more than 1 billion active mobile users. “If 2012 was the year we turned our core product into a mobile product, then 2013 was the year when we turned our business into a mobile business,” said Zuckerberg in April. “I expect 2014 will be the year when we begin to deliver new and engaging types of mobile experiences.” What those experiences are is already becoming clear. Here’s a breakdown of how mobile has become Facebook’s firmest friend, and what it means for the future of the world’s biggest social network. CONTINUE READING FROM 1 TO 10...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Youth fined $2,000 for spreading malicious news on Facebook

KLANG, MALAYSIA, DECEMBER 8, 2014 (INQUIRER) The Star/Asia News Network -


AP FILE PHOTO

A 23-year-old youth was fined RM 7,000 (about $2,000) or four months’ jail for spreading malicious news via Facebook last August.

Muhammad Nur Hafiz Palpha, an Internet installation company employee pleaded guilty before Sessions judge Surita Budin to committing the offense through his Facebook account, “Ringgo Pandan.”

He had posted a statement about some teenagers being killed while returning from prayers near Pandamaran in Klang.

According to the facts presented by deputy public prosecutor Rosidah Abu Bakar, a policeman based at the Pandamaran police station noticed the malicious posting at 8:15 a.m. on August 1.

The policeman lodged a report after verifying that the statement was uncorroborated, and investigations conducted by the Royal Malaysian Police’s Cyber Unit led to Muhammad Nur Hafiz’s mobile phone registration number and location.

He was arrested at No. 7, Lorong D10, Kampung Pandan, Kuala Lumpur on August 7.


FROM THE INQUIRER (YOUNG BLOOD)

Why I do not use Facebook (anymore) Audrey Dacquel @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:34 AM | Thursday, March 6th, 2014


GOOGLE IMAGES

I first used Facebook in 2009 when it was still cool to be perpetually online, to post silly faces and pictures of lunches (or brunches), and when nonsensical photos could garner as much as 30 “likes” upon upload. What a time that was.

Well, it’s been five years, and it’s getting a tad annoying.

For one, I cannot but cringe at the fact that people kept sending me game notifications (even I thought that was so last year), until Facebook caught that drift and these transformed into those pesky application invites.

Then there were the perpetual online love quarrels, and those cryptic one-liners that this new breed of romantics somehow keep shoving onto other people’s faces.

Apparently, to tag another person to a very superficial music video about love and fun and all that jazz is all one needs to do to express a voracious, passionate love affair that the world must know about. And don’t get me started about selfies, hashtags, and every other fad that people follow simply because they can.

Don’t get me wrong. I love the people I am friends with on that site. I genuinely think that they are a bunch of wonderful, quirky old fools trying to make sense of the world and how they fit into it.

What I do not approve of is how the site is indirectly insinuating that an active life online is equal to having the best form or means through which life can actually be spent. In other words, I think we have been ensnared by the idea that in order to maximize satisfaction from an activity, it must be broadcast and approved of by our immediate peers.

Otherwise, the activity itself would be of no consequence, or worse still, would not actually exist. If an event was not documented and posted online, it would be akin to erasing it from our own memories, which might lead us to question the validity of engaging in the activity in the first place.

I can perceive that from a lot of my friends (even from myself) who have been taking pictures or sharing stories for the mere sake of posting these online. The eagerness of the person to contribute to a hodgepodge of everyday stories, delivered to us each morning courtesy of our newsfeed, seems to be a pleasurable and convenient way of making our own stories into histories.

But is this the only way we can share our lives with our peers? Is this the only concrete manner through which we can contribute to our ever-evolving society?

If there is one thing that Facebook promises and actually delivers, it is the sensation of a unique hyperreality. Of attaining pseudo celebrity status at the meager price of a status update, of having a sense of belonging by offering or receiving electronic “likes” and emoticons. Or of having the most coveted sense of entitlement to any and all things that will grab our depleting attention spans, whether such would entail a pitch in collective opinion, or a participation in the latest hashtag—whichever may seem more appealing.

Wait, let me clarify: I am not suggesting these things under the guise of pretentiousness. I know these things because I participated in almost all of the Internet crazes we know of today. Because certain circumstances forced me to stop posting a lot of my Internet-savvy statuses, I became an observer, rather than a poster.

And while reviewing my own profile page, I was appalled at what nonsense was actually there. It made me wonder: Since when have I allowed myself to be preoccupied with trifling things that hardly mattered both to myself and to people who were forced to see them online? I shudder, and do not find the answer at all.

What terrifies me the most about this whole movement is the possibility that it is transforming the way we think and the way we live in relation to others, more than we actually expected it to. I miss the days when technology and gadgets were mere implements in setting up true conversations, in seeing true faces, in feeling real emotions from people we actually know from our experiences intertwined in theirs.

Now, technology has replaced all of that and reduced our real-life conversations to indifferent “hellos” or mechanical “how are yous,” while the substantial talk is filtered through texts, pictures and other forms of fleeting megabytes and gigabytes of data, which can be digitally erased into nothingness.

This Facebook thing may be convenient, but not all convenient things lead to valuable ones.

This is why (now) I’d rather forego the whole Facebook experience and try as much as possible to see the people I want to see, and welcome those that I serendipitously come to know.

To talk to them over whatever food or cheap coffee we can share. To hear their audible, true voices and just listen. To be able to definitively ascertain that I am talking to a living, breathing person and not just my computer sending out manufactured words and responses mimicking the other end of the conversation.

By doing so I reduce my time in front of my laptop. I rarely update my picture or status on that site, hardly checking if someone has messaged me. I would rather keep my mundane, mini-stories (although befitting a status update) to myself and watch these blossom into a genuine, finished narrative I can be proud to tell over and over again to my future children or even grandchildren. Because of this, a lot of my friends have been wondering how or where I am.

I don’t always reply, but they can be assured I am very much alive and all the more eager to listen—just not through Facebook.

Audrey Dacquel, 23, is a 2011 political science graduate of Ateneo de Manila University. She is now a law student at San Beda College.


FROM FORBES.COM

Fast Food for the Mind: Why I Don't Have a Facebook or Twitter Account Souvik Choudhury Souvik Choudhury , SungardAS Comment Now Follow Comments


Is consuming social media like “fast food for the mind?”

In the 1950s, the fast food phenomenon took America by storm. Several local and national establishments offered busy people a convenient albeit nutritionally deficient option for meals that was quite gratifying. Of course, in recent years, studies have shown a strong association between the consumption of fast food over time and chronic diseases like obesity.

Through social media interactions via online venues like Facebook and Twitter, our society today is overrun in the same way with “fast food for the mind.” Just as our bodies can tolerate only so much unhealthy food, our minds equally have a certain cognitive bandwidth. But instead of spending our bandwidth on deeper thoughts, we often sacrifice it for the instant gratification and distraction of the mind offered by myriad online venues.

Most things that we value in our society – great paintings, music, books, poems, technologies, or architecture – are results of deep thoughtfulness. As we benefit in some ways from deep thoughtfulness and intellect of other great minds, they help us find a broader meaning in life. The more time we spend as a society on the trivial distractions, the less we have to invest in connecting with our true self and potential.

Relationships are what make our lives rich and meaningful. Yet consider the deluge of insignificant posts and tweets the average person sees every day via Facebook and Twitter. How much meaningful relationship does it take to “like” someone’s post on Facebook or reply to someone’s thoughts on Twitter in 140 characters or less? And yet, this is all the interaction we have with some of our “closest” friends. How is this depth?

In fact, studies have shown that social media can be detrimental to self-esteem and happiness. In 2011, a study published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, proposed a new phenomenon called “Facebook depression,” which researchers defined as a “depression that develops when preteens and teens spend a great deal of time on social media sites, such as Facebook, and then begin to exhibit classic symptoms of depression.” This depression can be caused by a number of factors, including social comparison.

Another study, conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan and published last August, followed 82 college-aged students for two weeks and found that increased Facebook use was associated with a decline in moment-to-moment happiness and overall life satisfaction. Meanwhile, face-to-face and phone interactions actually had the opposite effect.

Frequent use of social media also seems to affect our judgment – even those who should know better have fallen prey to the power of instant gratification at our digital fingertips. Take Justine Sacco, the former PR executive who was fired for sending out an offensive tweet on her personal Twitter account. Her account didn’t have a large following at the time, and she likely believed it would never be seen by anyone important. But it was – and the thoughtless action ruined her career.

All of this doesn’t mean social media is bad all of the time. In moderation, fast food is convenient and likely does not have long-term negative effects. Just as it is important to nourish our bodies and find a balance between fast food – once in a while – with home-cooked meals most of the time, we need to slow down our thinking. Our communication and interactions should not subsist solely of tweets and Facebook messages.

If you’ve had too much fast food lately, it’s not too late to change your habits! Don’t jump on the bandwagon of constant irrelevant communication. In fact, it is even possible to survive and it may even be beneficial to not have a Facebook or Twitter account at all – I don’t. It allows me us to slow down my thinking and to invest my time in more meaningful conversations and relationships.

So I ask you – what kind of food are you eating?


FROM PSYCHOLOGY TODAY

Why Does Using Facebook Feel So Good?
Research reveals that the social network arouses fundamental human strivings.

Published on April 29, 2012 by Vinita Mehta, Ph.D., Ed.M. in Head Games

At a party a few years ago, a friend turned to me and in all seriousness stated that he would rather be at home on Facebook than catching up with some of his closest friends offline. Since I hadn't signed up for the network yet, I had no idea what he was talking about. He nearly burst as he raved about “Liking” and “Poking” (remember that feature?).

But he was on to something. Despite its further technologizing our experience, two new studies have found that the social network satisfies basic human desires, both body and soul.

According to recent research, Facebook literally makes us feel good. In a study published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Mauri et al. (2011) found that the network may owe some of its success to the positive state it conjures up in its users.

The scientists recorded an array of responses in 30 healthy subjects during a three-minute exposure to (a) a relaxation condition (a slideshow of nature scenes), (b) a stress condition (a timed test and a mathematical task), and (c) the subject's personal Facebook account. Participants' skin conductance, blood volume pulse, brainwave patterns, muscle activity, breathing activity, and pupil dilation were measured.

The researchers found that the pattern of biological signals while using Facebook produced a psychophysiological state that was distinct from the relaxation and stress conditions.

The findings also revealed that these biological signals are in concert with what they call a Core Flow State, which is characterized by “high positive valence and high arousal.”

With respect to Facebook usage, flow is an “optimal experience” that users enjoy and want to repeat. The investigators further suggest that the successful spread of social networking sites may be associated with a specific cluster of positive emotional states that people feel while using their account.

Turning to the mind, Nadkarni and Hofmann (2012) investigated the psychological factors that drive Facebook usage. Their review of the research found that two primary social needs motivate using the site.

The first need is the fundamental desire to belong.

Humans are designed to connect with others as well to feel accepted by them. Facebook has been found to promote connections in two steps (Sheldon et al., 2011).

Feeling disconnected initially motivates individuals to use the site (essentially as a coping mechanism), and in turn, the more they use it the more connections they gain.

The second striving Facebook responds to is self-presentation, in which users fashion ideal — rather than accurate — versions of themselves through their profiles. This is manifest in, for example, the number of “friends” in their network and photographs.

As such, Facebook personas that are presented online may be a more socially appealing “self” that is aspired to in reality, but one that is not yet realized (Zhao et al., 2008). The authors also note that these two needs can act together or independently to motivate using the network.

It would seem that maintaining relationships in the modern world is more challenging than ever, with our communities dissolving and increasing numbers of people living alone.

What a delightful irony that the more technological our lives become, it is still driven toward our primal and inescapable need to connect with others.


FROM THE GUARDIAN, UK

Why the future of Facebook is (almost) all about your smartphone Stuart Dredge
Wednesday 11 June 2014 10.21 BST


Facebook's mobile ambitions stretch beyond Instagram and WhatsApp.

10 steps to understanding how mobile is now the driving force behind the world’s biggest social network

Facebook started life as a website, but in 2014 it is mobile devices driving its growth. Mobile is the dominant influence on pretty much every new feature the social network launches.

Even back in October 2012, the chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, was telling analysts that “today there’s no argument: Facebook is a mobile company”. Fast forward to the end of March 2014, and that company had more than 1 billion active mobile users.

“If 2012 was the year we turned our core product into a mobile product, then 2013 was the year when we turned our business into a mobile business,” said Zuckerberg in April. “I expect 2014 will be the year when we begin to deliver new and engaging types of mobile experiences.”

What those experiences are is already becoming clear. Here’s a breakdown of how mobile has become Facebook’s firmest friend, and what it means for the future of the world’s biggest social network.

1. Mobile usage of Facebook is still growing
That “1 billion monthly active mobile users” stat in the first quarter of 2014 was up 34% compared with the same period in 2013. What’s more, Facebook’s daily active mobile users rose 43% to 609 million in the same period.

Of Facebook’s overall daily active users, only 55% access it from their mobiles: that’s around 441 million people. Meanwhile, the separate Instagram and Facebook Messenger apps each have more than 200 million monthly active users, with WhatsApp – bought by Facebook for $19bn earlier this year – already used by 500 million people.

This is translating into more money for Facebook through advertising: 59% of its $2.3bn of ad revenues in the first quarter of this year came from mobile, a proportion that stood at 30% in the first quarter of 2013, and just 14% in the third quarter of 2012.

When ice-cream brand Ben & Jerry’s ran a Facebook advertising campaign early this year, it reached 14m people – and 90% of them saw the ad on their mobile devices. Mobile growth isn’t just about usage for Facebook, it’s about hard dollars too.

2. Facebook is 'unbundling the big blue app'

Facebook’s big mobile strategy in 2014 is to get people using a range of its apps, not just its main one. Acquisitions like Instagram and WhatsApp are part of that strategy, but so is Messenger, with people currently being forced to install the latter app if they want to continue accessing their Facebook private messages inbox from their smartphones.

Also, see the new Facebook apps being built in-house by its Creative Labs division: news-reading app Paper, and the upcoming (and recently “accidentally” launched) Snapchat-style photo and video-sharing app Slingshot.

“In mobile there’s a big premium on creating single-purpose first-class experiences. So what we’re doing with Creative Labs is basically unbundling the big blue app,” Zuckerberg told the New York Times in April.

Facebook’s strategy for these new apps is to launch them, add and remove features based on early feedback, then try to get them up to 100m active users each before starting to make money from them.

“We want to provide the best tools to share with different size, groups and in different contexts, and to develop more mobile experiences beyond just the main Facebook app, like Instagram and Messenger,” Zuckerberg told analysts in February.

3. It isn’t afraid to splash the cash on external apps

Facebook isn’t just building new apps: it’s willing to buy them too. Paying $1bn for Instagram in April 2012 raised a few eyebrows, but it was eclipsed by the $19bn for WhatsApp in February 2014 – with those deals sandwiching a rejected $3bn bid for Snapchat in 2013.

Fitness-tracking app Moves was snapped up for an undisclosed (i.e. not in the billions) amount in April this year, but there has also been a steady stream of acquisitions of mobile startups: Beluga, Snaptu, Push Pop Press, Gowalla, Spool, Parse, Jibbigo, Onavo and more.

Often, the aim is to bag a talented team of developers and/or some innovative technology: the actual apps are usually shut down, although they live on within Facebook’s own products.

4. Coming to your mobile: more Facebook ad formats

Facebook is making more money from mobile advertising because it’s showing more ads in your mobile news feed – and charging advertisers more for the fine-tuned targeting based on its massive stash of user data.

It’s also experimenting with new formats though. “Premium Video Ads” were tested from December 2013, then launched properly in March 2014: 15-second clips that automatically play (silently) as you scroll past them, but then expand to full-screen with sound when tapped on.

Instagram launched its own in-stream ads in the US in October 2013, and has just announced that they’re expanding to the UK, Canada and Australia. But now Facebook is also launching something called Audience Network – its own network of mobile ads inside other companies’ apps, using its own targeting.

In other words, even if you're not using Facebook's own apps, you may still be seeing its ads elsewhere.

5. The delicate balancing act between ads and updates

As Facebook shows more ads in your news feed, does that mean you’re seeing less updates from the friends and pages you care about? It’s a hot-potato issue that rightfully sparks a lot of debate.

Facebook argues that if it gets mobile advertising right, the ads you see will be for things you care about too. It has also argued that its news feed algorithm is firmly focused on relevancy: plucking out 300-odd stories a day for you to see, from a potential 1,500.

Which 300 you see depends on factors including how often you interact with their creators; how much those posts have already been liked, shared and commented on by your friends and the wider world; how much you've shown an interest in those kinds of post in the past; and whether people are hiding or reporting them.

Marketing folk have been complaining vociferously in recent months about declining “organic page reach” – the number of people who’ve liked their page that see a particular update – while Facebook argues that the reason is relevancy, not advertising.

“We've gotten better at showing high-quality content, and we've cleaned up News Feed spam,” claimed Facebook recently. But as its advertising business continues to grow, questions about the respective priority of ads, status updates and page posts will continue to fly.

6. Facebook is changing the way you use it to sign in to other apps

You’ve been able to sign in to other apps and digital services with your Facebook details for a long time now, thanks to its Facebook Connect technology. At the company’s recent f8 developer conference, it announced plans to add anonymity to the idea.

You’ll soon be able to log in to other apps using your Facebook account without sharing your details with the app’s maker, from Spotify to social game developers. The theory is that you can try out the apps without giving them your personal data, before (if you want) later tweaking the settings to share more.

Anonymous login is currently being tested with “a few developers” and sounds like a step forward for Facebook and privacy. But questions quickly emerged around just how anonymous it really is: Spotify might not know who you are if you use anonymous login, but Facebook still knows that you’re using Spotify.

7. Facebook wants to know what you’re listening to and watching

Another new feature coming to Facebook’s main app was described in late May as “a new, optional way to share and discover music, TV and movies”. Essentially it’s the equivalent of the Shazam app: technology that listens to what you're watching or listening to, and tries to identify it.

Facebook says this will be used purely as another tag for your status updates – “if you want to share that you’re listening to your favourite Beyoncé track or watching the season premiere of Game of Thrones, you can do it quickly and easily, without typing” – much like checking in to a location or tagging a friend.

The news sparked concern in some quarters that Facebook’s app will always be listening in on your media habits – interestingly, more concern than when Shazam launched exactly that in the form of its Auto Shazam feature.

Facebook says it won’t be following suit. “The microphone doesn't turn itself on, it will ask for permission,” Facebook’s Gregg Stefancik told Australian journalists in May. “It's not always listening... so it's very limited in what it is sampling.” Sceptics will be watching carefully for any change in that policy at a later date.

8. Whatever happened to the ‘Facebook Phone’?

In 2012, there was a flurry of rumours about Facebook launching its own smartphone. “Zuckerberg is worried that if he does not create a mobile phone soon Facebook will simply become an app on other mobile platforms,” as The Guardian reported it at the time.

That didn’t happen, but in April 2013 Facebook launched an Android app called Facebook Home, which took over the homescreen with Facebook features. "We're not building a phone," said Zuckerberg. "We're not building an operating system. We're building something that's a whole lot deeper."

It flopped, as did the HTC First smartphone that launched as a flagship for the new app. Home took almost a month to hit a million downloads on Android’s Google Play store, with a blizzard of negative reviews from initial users.

“We’re patient; we’re prepared to give it time. We’re believers in Home; we believe it’s going to be valuable for users,” maintained Facebook engineering director Jocelyn Goldfein in February 2014.

But Zuckerberg admitted in April that Home was “riskier” than Facebook’s other apps: “Home is your lock screen. When you install it, it’s really active, and if it does anything that you don’t like, then you’ll uninstall it,” he said.

Facebook’s strategy now appears to be less about trying to take over homescreens, and more about helping apps link more easily to one another. In April, it unveiled something called AppLinks to do exactly that, with support from the likes of Spotify, Pinterest, Mailbox, Tumblr and Flickr.

9. Facebook sees mobile as the key to emerging markets

It’s often tempting to see Facebook’s future prospects as defined by how westerners use the social network: for example, the debate about whether teenagers are fleeing Facebook for Snapchat. Actually, the company sees its future as defined just as much by the developing world.

Hence Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to spread reliable internet access (and thus access to Facebook and its apps) to countries where connectivity hasn’t been taken for granted. Zuckerberg’s mission is to make “basic” mobile data access free.

"Text-based communication services, whether it's things like social networks or messaging or email or search, whether stock prices – basic stuff like that, that people will use on a day-to-day basis, but don't require huge amount of data," he said at the Mobile World Congress conference earlier this year.

Early partnerships with mobile operators in the Philippines and Paraguay have apparently helped 3m people get online who weren't already, but Facebook has even grander ambitions that sound like science fiction...

10. Don’t forget about the drones and lasers

As chirpy openings to a Facebook status update go, it’s hard to beat Zuckerberg’s from March 2014. “In our effort to connect the whole world with Internet.org, we've been working on ways to beam internet to people from the sky,” he wrote.

"Today, we're sharing some details of the work Facebook's Connectivity Lab is doing to build drones, satellites and lasers to deliver the internet to everyone." Mobile devices will be the main recipients of that beamed-down internet, and WhatsApp is expected to be one of the key apps making use of it.

That’s why knee-jerk analysis of Facebook’s mobile strategy is rarely a good idea. Yes, you could see that $19bn for WhatsApp as a panicked response to an app capable of stealing young users away from Facebook in the west.

But what if it’s more a big bet on what people of all ages might want to use elsewhere in the world – as an alternative to the text messaging traditionally offered by the very same operators who are striking zero-data partnerships with Facebook in the developing world?

If nothing else, Facebook's mobile strategy is about the long game, although whether it will be successful is a question that will have to wait a few years.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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