WIFI HUBS TO REPLACE NEW YORK PAY PHONES 

PHOTO: Thousands of high-tech terminals offering free WiFi and other services will soon replace New York’s remaining fleet of seldom-used pay phones, the city mayor said Monday. Mayor Bill de Blasio called the “LinkNYC” system “the fastest and largest municipal WiFi network in the world.” Up to 10,000 terminals will provide free Internet access up to 150 feet (45 meters) from hubs, which will be phased in across the city’s five boroughs beginning in 2015. Free domestic phone calls can also be made from the stations, which feature a touch-screen interface, a cell phone and tablet charging station, and provide access to emergency services.

ALSO: Manila eyes Wi-Fi-ready waiting sheds 

PHOTO: Vice Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso. INQUIRER.NET FILE PHOTO/RYAN LEAGOGO MANILA, Philippines—Waiting sheds equipped with free Wi-Fi service and solar-powered streetlights will soon be installed in Manila, in line with the local government’s revival plans for the city. Vice Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso earlier this week said a private company would shoulder the cost of the Internet connection and the building of waiting sheds at designated bus stops. On Friday, Mayor Joseph Estrada signed a memorandum of agreement with Global Gold Goal Inc., represented by its president and chief executive officer Frederick Ordoñez, for the donation of almost 10,000 solar-powered LED streetlights worth P2.2 billion. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Selfie sticks: Capturing the world, one selfie at a time 

MANILA, Philippines - Remember the days when you have to mount your camera on a tripod or practically any stable surface then sprint back to your barkada and squeeze yourself into the group right before the red blinking light of the camera stops? It’s the old way of taking a group or self-portrait. But in a snap, selfie stick, an extendable handheld self-portrait-taker that is usually attached to smartphones, has taken the limelight out of camera tripods. Tripod’s one-legged brother “selfie stick” is clearly having a moment of its own online. According to Google Trends, online queries for selfie stick, monopod, and other related terms started to pick up in 2014, mostly in Southeast Asian countries. Indonesians, Malaysians and Filipinos currently lead other Asian neighbors in terms of online interests on selfie sticks. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: A New Way to Invest in Tech Stocks

You didn’t have to be a rocket scientist to make money in technology stocks this year. Year-to-date, tech stocks have outperformed the broader market by more than 50%. Over the last 12 months, shares of one of the largest technology exchange-traded funds, the Technology SPDR ETF (NYSE: XLK), are up 27%. But what if I told you that the value of your portfolio could have increased by almost twice that amount within the same time period? Today you’ll learn how a small group of investors earn returns that literally dwarf the broader technology market. These folks have seen gains of 44% in 12 months… 40,000% in 3 years… READ FULL ARTICLE...

ALSO: How to tackle traffic woes without adding more roads

MANILA, Philippines - More than half of the world’s population now lives in cities. There are many benefits that come from millions of people living, working and interacting in close proximity to one another. Traffic, however, is not one of them. More than just an annoyance that impacts quality of life, chronic traffic congestion can be bad for the economy and the environment. In June, NEDA and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) released a roadmap for traffic infrastructure development in Metro Manila and nearby areas saying that the Philippines lost around P2.4 billion every day in 2012 because of the traffic congestion. The report also forecast that the losses may increase to P6 billion a day come 2030. The environment is not to be spared from such predicament as JICA’s report also shared that 4.79 million tons of gas emissions a year was recorded in the Philippines due to the severe traffic jams in 2012, which may climb to 5.72 million tons in 2030. READ FULL REPORT...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

WiFi hubs to replace New York pay phones


People walk by a public phone on a Manhattan street on May 2, 2014 in New York City. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for proposals to turn underused phone booths into Wi-Fi hot spots. AFP

NEW YORK, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 (INQUIRER) Agence France-Presse - Thousands of high-tech terminals offering free WiFi and other services will soon replace New York’s remaining fleet of seldom-used pay phones, the city mayor said Monday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio called the “LinkNYC” system “the fastest and largest municipal WiFi network in the world.”

Up to 10,000 terminals will provide free Internet access up to 150 feet (45 meters) from hubs, which will be phased in across the city’s five boroughs beginning in 2015.

Free domestic phone calls can also be made from the stations, which feature a touch-screen interface, a cell phone and tablet charging station, and provide access to emergency services.

De Blasio said the CityBridge technology group was chosen to carry out the project. It requires approval by a city committee next month.

Digital advertising displays will finance the project “at no cost to taxpayers,” de Blasio said, adding that the hubs are expected to generate more than $500 million over the course of their first 12 years and create 100 to 150 jobs.

“We’re taking a critical step toward a more equal, open and connected city — for every New Yorker, in every borough,” de Blasio said.

WiFi is already available in dozens of New York parks, as well as a small part of the Chelsea neighborhood. Chelsea was part of an initiative by US technology giant Google.

In September 2013, then mayor Michael Bloomberg announced the creation of wireless corridors in parts of Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens and Staten Island as well as a WiFi extension in parts of Manhattan, including Harlem.


FROM THE INQUIRER

Manila eyes Wi-Fi-ready waiting sheds  Erika Sauler @erikasauler -


Vice Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso.
INQUIRER.NET FILE PHOTO/RYAN LEAGOGO

MANILA, Philippines—Waiting sheds equipped with free Wi-Fi service and solar-powered streetlights will soon be installed in Manila, in line with the local government’s revival plans for the city.

Vice Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso earlier this week said a private company would shoulder the cost of the Internet connection and the building of waiting sheds at designated bus stops.

On Friday, Mayor Joseph Estrada signed a memorandum of agreement with Global Gold Goal Inc., represented by its president and chief executive officer Frederick Ordoñez, for the donation of almost 10,000 solar-powered LED streetlights worth P2.2 billion.

“These projects are timely because the city has no funds. The private companies will build these at no cost to the city and yet the people will benefit,” Estrada said.

The city is billed around P18 million monthly for the streetlights’ power supply alone, an amount which Estrada said could be reduced with the installation of solar-powered lamps. City Hall expects them to cover Manila’s six districts in three phases within two years.

Both the waiting sheds and streetlights will be fitted with monitoring cameras, as well as LED signboards for advertisements.

Domagoso said commuters may start seeing the Wi-Fi-ready waiting sheds within the next two weeks along loading and unloading zones for buses, as designated by the city’s Traffic Management Committee.

A list of these loading-unloading zones was attached to a proposed measure amending Ordinance No. 8092, or the Traffic Management Code of the City of Manila, which the City Council recently passed on second reading.

They include Quirino-Taft Avenue, Park N’ Ride Lawton Terminal, España before Lacson (for northbound buses coming from Cavite province); the footbridge in front of the University of Santo Tomas, Manila Multimodal Terminal, Luneta Park, Quirino-Taft Avenue (eastbound coming from Fairview); V. Mapa, Ramon Magsaysay Boulevard, Pureza Street, Arlegui Street, and Park N’ Ride Lawton Terminal (westbound coming from San Juan).

“This goes to show that while we’re enforcing traffic discipline, the city government is also sensitive to the plight of commuters,” Domagoso said.


FROM PHILSTAR

Selfie sticks: Capturing the world, one selfie at a time (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 24, 2014 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


Just the right stick: Take a selfie use a selfie stick

MANILA, Philippines - Remember the days when you have to mount your camera on a tripod or practically any stable surface then sprint back to your barkada and squeeze yourself into the group right before the red blinking light of the camera stops? It’s the old way of taking a group or self-portrait.

But in a snap, selfie stick, an extendable handheld self-portrait-taker that is usually attached to smartphones, has taken the limelight out of camera tripods.

Tripod’s one-legged brother “selfie stick” is clearly having a moment of its own online. According to Google Trends, online queries for selfie stick, monopod, and other related terms started to pick up in 2014, mostly in Southeast Asian countries.

Indonesians, Malaysians and Filipinos currently lead other Asian neighbors in terms of online interests on selfie sticks.

Google Trends shows that it was late 2013 that the obsession on selfie sticks first started in Jakarta, Indonesia, roughly seven times the interest in the US. The contagious obsession for selfie sticks soon spread to Malaysia between January-March 2014, double the search interests of Indonesians.

Time’s Selfie Capital of the World Philippines overtook Malaysia in the number of online queries for selfie stick, bagging another belt to become the selfie stick capital of the world, with double the search interest of Malaysia.

The ubiquity of selfie sticks must have been caused by the global selfie pandemic that captured the world in 2012. An online study conducted by Google on the history of people’s interest on the term selfie revealed that the journey of selfie to online stardom only gained traction in 2012 beginning in Asia, contrary to claims that it first popularized in the US.

The Japanese term for selfie in 2012 was more than 50 times more searched than US’ selfie. The Taiwanese, Korean and Chinese equivalents were also far more searched than selfie.

The selfie explosion soon gave birth to selfies’ most tag-along friend—the selfie stick. The extendable metal ‘wand’ does its magic by simplifying the art of doing a selfie. Its appeal seems to be in its strong inclusive element—everyone fits into the frame—and its spontaneity that usually brings about wacky photographs.

Nowadays, people often confuse selfie sticks with monopods. But there was a time that when people needed to take steady shots, they sought the traditional monopod.

A Google image search of the term monopod’, limited to results from 2000-2010, shows that monopod then referred to that single-stand camera support. However, in January of this year, the same image search for the one-legged camera stand is now the handheld selfie stick.

The popularity of selfie sticks is now stretching out farther to the northern part of Asia. In August this year, online searches on selfie stick peaked among selfie-takers in Japan and South Korea, with Korea showing the bigger spike.

Dubai is also increasingly overtaking Indonesia and Philippines as selfie stick search capitals, placing second after Singapore that made high interests on the modern arm extenders.

“Almost everything now seems to find meaning in the four corners of digital photography. The figures we gathered on selfie sticks provide a portrait on how the act of capturing ourselves visually as a way to communicate is continuously evolving. From the early cameras to smartphones and to photography enabling tools like tripods and now selfie sticks, people continuously find ways to better represent themselves in a community that has evolved into digital natives,” said Gail Tan, Google Philippines head of communications.


FROM Copyright 2014 Crowdability, Inc.

A New Way to Invest in Tech Stocks By Wayne Mulligan - You didn’t have to be a rocket scientist to make money in technology stocks this year.

Year-to-date, tech stocks have outperformed the broader market by more than 50%.

Over the last 12 months, shares of one of the largest technology exchange-traded funds, the Technology SPDR ETF (NYSE: XLK), are up 27%.

But what if I told you that the value of your portfolio could have increased by almost twice that amount within the same time period?


Today you’ll learn how a small group of investors earn returns that literally dwarf the broader technology market.

These folks have seen gains of 44% in 12 months… 40,000% in 3 years…

And even 200,000% in 8 years.

You’ll learn about all of them in a moment… and the little-known secret to their staggering returns.

How Henry Turned $5,000 into $2 Million

A friend and business partner of mine, Henry, has been a successful technology investor for almost two decades.

It would be impossible to count all of the profitable technology investments he’s been involved in over the years.

But recently, Henry told me about one of his most successful investments ever…

It was in a small transportation company – well, it was small when Henry first invested.

But in only three short years, the company grew exponentially… and so did the value of its shares.

By how much?

Well, Henry’s investment grew by more than 40,000% — or 400x its original value – in roughly 36 months.

Meaning, for every $1,000 Henry invested, he pulled out $400,000.

And for every $5,000 he invested, he made $2 million.

How Peter Turned Every $1,000 He Invested into $2 Million

Turning $5,000 into $2 million is a stunning return. But that’s nothing compared to what another tech investor, Peter Thiel, was able to earn.

You see, back in 2004 Peter invested in a small, Palo Alto, California based technology company.

At the time, the company only had a few dozen employees and almost no revenue.

Today, it has more than 6,000 employees. It’s on track to generate $10 billion in sales this year.

And what about Peter’s investment?

Well, Peter’s returns were even more impressive than Henry’s:

Peter made almost 200,000% on his money. That’s a 2,000x return.

Basically, for every $1,000 he invested, Peter pulled out $2 million.

With just a $5,0000 investment, Peter would be sitting on a profit of $10 million.

What's Their Secret?

These returns may sound unbelievable. But they’re real… and they’re documented.

But, I’m sure you’re wondering, “What’s the catch?”

Well, I’ll tell you…

Henry and Peter aren’t ordinary investors. And what they invested in wasn’t ordinary stock.

You see, Henry and Peter are what are known as “angel investors.” Instead of investing in large, mature, publicly-traded companies like Apple and Microsoft. Henry and Peter invest in smaller, privately held, start-up companies when they’re just getting off the ground.

Henry’s investment was in a company called Uber. Uber’s a new type of taxi company that’s taken the world by storm. Although Uber is still privately held, Henry was able to sell his stake to a larger investor earlier this year.

And Peter?

Peter was the first investor in a company I’m certain you’re familiar with: Facebook.

Peter backed the company with a $500,000 investment when the social network was first getting started. When the company went public in 2012, his $500,000 investment turned into $1 billion.

Historically, investing in young, privately-held start-up companies has shown investors the greatest returns…

If you want to see similar profits, these are the types of opportunities you want to invest in.

But you might be wondering, if these opportunities are so profitable, then…

“Why Haven't I Heard of Them Before?”

Well, to put it simply, the US Securities and Exchange Commission banned you from participating in this type of investment – or even from hearing about them.

In 1933 – in response to the market crash – the SEC put regulations in place that prohibited 97% of the investing public from investing in early-stage, private companies.

This type of investing – known as “Angel Investing” – was reserved for only the wealthiest investors in the country.

However, thanks to a new law that was enacted only a few months ago (it’s called “The JOBS Act”), angel investing will soon be open to all investors.

And with returns like Henry’s and Peter’s, it’s a type of investment that many people will be clamoring to learn more about and invest in.

But are you ready to start angel investing yourself?

Not so fast…

A Little Bit of Knowledge Could Be a Dangerous Thing

With higher returns comes higher risk.

Due to the potential of early-stage investing, we predict many people will want to dive right in and start putting their money to work.

But we also predict many of those people will get hurt as a result.

Your best bet is to proceed with caution...

And to educate and prepare yourself.

In order to help you do that we’ve put together a special training manual called, “Crowdability’s Angel Investing 101.”

It’s a free course you’ll receive when you subscribe to the free Crowdability newsletter. In addition to this free course we’ll also send you weekly essays and reports on angel investing to help you stay abreast of this new investment option.

If you’d like to learn more and begin receiving our free series, Crowdability’s Angel Investing 101, simply enter your email address in the box below and check your inbox for your first email.

TO ENTER YOUR EMAIL CLICK THIS URL
http://alturl.com/t96ru AND SCROLL DOWN TO THE BOX

Happy Investing!

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FROM PHILSTAR

How to tackle traffic woes without adding more roads By Gianluca Lange (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 17, 2014 - 12:00am 0 41 googleplus0 0


Stop the traffic, please: More than just an annoyance that impacts quality of life, chronic traffic congestion can be bad for the economy and the environment.

MANILA, Philippines - More than half of the world’s population now lives in cities. There are many benefits that come from millions of people living, working and interacting in close proximity to one another.

Traffic, however, is not one of them.

More than just an annoyance that impacts quality of life, chronic traffic congestion can be bad for the economy and the environment.

In June, NEDA and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) released a roadmap for traffic infrastructure development in Metro Manila and nearby areas saying that the Philippines lost around P2.4 billion every day in 2012 because of the traffic congestion.

The report also forecast that the losses may increase to P6 billion a day come 2030. The environment is not to be spared from such predicament as JICA’s report also shared that 4.79 million tons of gas emissions a year was recorded in the Philippines due to the severe traffic jams in 2012, which may climb to 5.72 million tons in 2030.

Fortunately, cities have other options at their disposal to help tackle and tame urban traffic congestion. They also have access to sophisticated software tools that can help simulate the impact of these solutions before anything is built.

This allows urban planners to experiment with multiple scenarios and select the best mix of solutions to address their traffic woes.

Fast-moving buses.

Bus rapid transit (BRT) varies from region to region, but it typically involves creating a dedicated lane for buses on surface roads, so that buses can move large amounts of people from point A to point B more quickly.

This is why it is good that the World Bank has recently approved a financial package to facilitate the implementation of the Philippines’ first bus rapid transit (BRT) in Cebu.

As with any transit decision, a tradeoff is involved: if you put in a BRT lane, you lose a lane for cars. Software models can help analyze the transit network as a whole to show how many more riders a stretch of road could carry with a BRT system in place and how much time could potentially be shaved off of daily commutes.

Smart traffic lights. Nobody likes waiting on a red light—especially when no cross-traffic is using the green light. Adaptive traffic lights vary their signals in real time to improve traffic flow.

Traffic flow adjustments.

This may sound counterintuitive, but when traffic becomes very busy, you can actually get more through put if you slow everyone down a bit.

Metered entrances at highway on-ramps – or similar meters along the roadway—control the speed dynamic and help prevent the start-stop traffic that tends to create traffic jams.

Congestion tolls.

Used to great success in places like London and Singapore, congestion tolls offer another way for cities to get more capacity out of an existing road. By charging people a toll to drive into the city center, congestion tolls create an incentive for people to carpool, so that the road carries more people per hour than it normally would.

Bike-sharing services.

Bikes take up less space than cars, which means that you can fit more bicyclists than cars onto any given stretch of road.

And while an increase in bicyclists means taking away some existing road space to create a bike lane, these are generally half the width of a car lane.

In fact, the Metro Manila Development Authority has launched a bike-sharing program in March 2014 and expanding this existing program to more major roads may magnify its transportation advantages to commuters.

Ride-sharing services.

Technology has been able to connect people who want a ride with drivers who have an available car with the use of mobile apps. Simply put, they’ve found a way to optimize the use of a vehicle so that it is more widely used.

As more and more people gravitate towards urban centers, cities will need to find new approaches to dealing with traffic congestion.

By exploring the full range of available options — rather than simply building more roads — cities can effectively tackle ever-worsening traffic and make urban areas more livable places for the coming decades.

* * *

Gianluca Lange is Autodesk regional industry manager for AEC/ENI, ASEAN.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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